How to Create a Switch in Cinema 4D: Part 2

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a 3D Nintendo Switch model to use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning Cinema 4D quickly. 

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, importing reference images, adding lighting to the scene and basic rendering techniques.

In the first part (How to Create a Switch in Cinema 4D: Part 1) of the two-part tutorial, I showed you how to:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the Switch

In this, the second part of the the tutorial series, I’ll show you how to:

  • How to Create Coloured Materials
  • Color in the Nintendo Switch Model
  • Render the Nintendo Switch Model

16. How to Create a New Material

Step 1

Located near the bottom of the screen there is a material selection window. Click on Create > New Material to create a new material to use that you can edit. 

Materials are used to colour in the the Nintendo Switch.

Select New Material from the menu
Select New Material from the menu

Step 2

Double-click on the new material icon (displayed as a sphere). This brings up the Material Editor, where you adjust the various properties of the material such as the colour, transparency and reflectance. 

For this particular style you’ll only be interested in flat colour (Luminance).

Open the Material Editor
Open the Material Editor

Step 3

Tick the button for Luminance and untick the boxes for Colour and Reflectance. This will give the cel shaded look for the final image. 

Select Luminance
Select Luminance

Step 4

Colour the body of the Nintendo Switch by adding the material to the object. Drag and drop the material to the object using the mouse. You can also drag and drop the material onto the object listed on the right of the screen. 

Drag new material on to the 3D model
Drag new material on to the 3D model

17. How to Adjust the Material Properties

Step 1

In the Material Editor, click on the arrow button next to Texture and select Sketch and Toon > Cel from the menu.

Select Sketch and Toon and Cel from the menu
Select Sketch and Toon and Cel from the menu

Step 2

Click on the new Cel button that appears next to Texture to bring up a new menu.

Click on the Cel button
Click on the Cel button

Step 3

In this new menu, adjust the settings as follows:

  1. Change the Diffuse to match the image at below. It should be grey scale with the colour getting light from left to right.
  2. Untick Camera.
  3. Tick Lights.
  4. Tick Shadows 
  5. Select Multiply from the drop down menu.
Adjust the settings in the editor
Adjust the settings in the editor

Step 4

Select a colour by double-clicking on the colour option box . 

The Material Editor gives many different options for choosing and picking colours. These include RGB, HSV and so on. 

Choose whichever option you’re most familiar with as a flat colour. Because of the Multiply shading mode, the different colour shades will also appear in the material.

If the material has already been applied to the model, the colour of the model will automatically be adjusted to the new material colour. This is useful if you change your mind on a certain colour or a certain part of the Nintendo Switch model. 

Choose the following colours for this tutorial:

  • R: 84
  • G: 100
  • B: 153
Create a colour for the object
Create a colour for the object

Step 5

Because you’ve already applied the material to the model, the colour of the Switch is automatically adjusted to the new material colour.

Apply the colour
Apply the colour

18. How to Adjust the Shading

Step 1

To get a  better idea of the shading and how our render will turn out as we work on it, click and hold the Render Button and select Interactive Render Region from the menu. 

Select Interactive Render Region
Select Interactive Render Region

Step 2

Use the mouse to adjust the window so that it fits around the Nintendo Switch model. Look for the very small arrow on the right hand side of the window and use the mouse to drag it to the top right corner of the box (this increases the resolution). 

Decrease the resolution by moving the arrow down if you find that the performance is decreasing.

Adjust the resolution
Adjust the resolution

Step 3

To change the way the light source is facing go to Options > Default Light.

You can also add a light object to the scene if you are more comfortable working that way.  

Select default light
Select default light

Step 4

Change the light source in the Default Light window. Click where you’d like the light source to come from on the sphere and it will sync with the view port. Experiment with different lighting positions to come up with a lighting situation that you like. 

This can be adjusted at anytime so you can change the lighting again if you changed your mind.

Change the lighting direction
Change the lighting direction

19. Other Lighting Solutions

Step 1

To set up the basic lighting, go to the Floor button located in the top menu bar. Primary-Click-Hold and then select Physical Sky from the menu.

Select Physical Sky
Select Physical Sky

Step 2

Make sure that Physical Sky is selected in the menu on the right, a new menu appears on the bottom right of the screen. Select the Time and Location tab and choose a time using the left and right arrow keys. 

This changes the lighting of the scene (according to the time of the day). Choose a suitable time to light up the scene. You’ll see how the lighting affects the scene in the viewport.

Select a Time
Select a Time 

Step 3

To add a light to the scene, select the Add Light button in the top menu bar at the top of the screen.

This creates a Light Object which you can move around the scene. Move the light object using the Move Tool to a suitable position.

Select the Add Light Button
Select the Add Light Button

Step 4

To customise the lighting further, experiment with the light object options in the bottom right of the screen. Here you can adjust the Intensity, Light Type and even Colour.

Light Object adjustments
Light Object adjustments

20. How to Colour the Switch Screen

Step 1

To create a new material we can duplicate the material by holding CTRL on the keyboard and then using the mouse to click and drag the material to the side.

Duplicate material
Duplicate material

Step 2

Double-click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there we can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 81
  • G: 223
  • B: 185
Choose a new colour
Choose a new colour

Step 3

Apply the new material to the screen by clicking and dragging it directly onto the object.

Apply material to model
Apply material to model

21. How to Colour the Joy-Cons

Step 1

Create a new material. Duplicate a previous material in order to keep the settings from before.

Double-click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there we can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 61
  • G: 182
  • B: 255
Create a blue colour for the Joy-Con
Create a blue colour for the Joy-Con

Step 2

Duplicate another new material. Double-click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there we can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 255
  • G: 121
  • B: 122
Create a red colour for the Joy-Con
Create a red colour for the Joy-Con

Step 3

Apply the materials to the relevant Joy-Con’s by dragging and dropping the colours onto the objects in the viewport. 

Use the list of objects in the object manager on the right of the screen. 

Apply new materials to Joy-Cons
Apply new materials to Joy-Cons

22. How to Color the Switch Details

Part 1

To color the details of the Nintendo Switch (such as the joystick and the buttons etc.) we are going to use the dark blue material which was the first material created to colour in the screen.

  • R: 84
  • G: 100
  • B: 153
Use the first material
Use the first material

Part 2

Apply the material to the rail of the Joy-Con by dragging and dropping it onto the object.

Apply material to the rail
Apply material to the rail

Part 3

Apply the material to the four buttons of the Joy-Con by dragging and dropping it onto the button objects one at a time.

Apply material to the buttons
Apply material to the buttons

Part 4

Apply the material to the joysick of the Joy-Con by dragging and dropping it onto the objects.

Apply material to the joystick
Apply material to the joystick

Part 5

Apply the material to the “-” button and the “home” button of the Joy-Con by dragging and dropping it onto the objects.

Apply material to the buttons
Apply material to the buttons

Part 6

For the remaining details, create a new material which should be a slightly darker colour than the first material that was created. 

Choose the following colours for this tutorial:

  • R: 73
  • G: 87
  • B: 133
Create a darker material colour
Create a darker material colour

Part 7

Apply the new material onto the details highlighted in the image below.

Apply material to the details
Apply material to the details

Part 8

For the last part of the Joy-Con, use the main blue colour and apply it by dragging and dropping it onto the object.

Apply material to the object
Apply material to the object

Part 9

Repeat the same steps for the second Joy-Con and replace the blue material with the red material.

Apply the materials to the red Joy-Con
Apply the materials to the red Joy-Con

Part 10

For the final details of the Nintendo Switch apply the dark blue material as shown in the image below.

Apply material to the Nintendo Switch
Apply material to the Nintendo Switch

23. How to Render the Nintendo Switch

Part 1

Click on the camera button to return to the camera view. This should be the same composition used in the previous tutorial ‘How to Create a Switch in Cinema 4D: Part 1‘.

Switch the camera on

Part 2

On the top menu bar, click on the Render Settings button. This brings up the render settings window.

Click on the Render Settings button
Click on the Render Settings button

Part 3

In the render settings menu, you can change the options to what you need. First, tick the Save Settings to select a file location, file format and alpha channel.

Select Alpha Channel if you wish to keep the background see through.

Save settings
Save settings

Part 4

In the Output Settings choose the resolution, height and width of the image. 

Output settings
Output settings

Part 5

To ensure that the render is nice and sharp go to the Anti-Aliasing settings. Select Cubic (Still Image) which can be found under Filter. 

Anti-Aliasing settings
Anti-Aliasing settings

Part 6

To create the final image, click on the Render button. Remember to select the right view in the viewport (front, right, left or perspective etc.) and that you’re happy with the camera angle. 

Choose a suitable angle in the viewport by navigating around the scene.

Click on the Render button
Click on the Render button

Part 7

To create the final image, click on the Render button. Remember to select the right view in the viewport (front, right, left or perspective etc.) and that you’re happy with the camera angle. 

Choose a suitable angle in the viewport by navigating around the scene.

Click on the Camera button
Click on the Camera button

The End Result

Wait for the final render to finish. Once the render is complete you can repeat the steps above and change the camera or the view port to create a new image from a different angle. 

Throughout the course of the project you have successfully learnt how to:

  • Import Reference Images
  • Prepare for Modelling
  • Model a Nintendo Switch
  • Create Materials
  • Colour the Model
  • Render the Nintendo Switch

Feel free to share your own creations below. You can also export your image into Adobe Photoshop to enhance it further or to use it as part of a larger image.

Final Nintendo Switch render
Final Nintendo Switch render

How to Create a Switch in Cinema 4D: Part 1

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a 3D Nintendo Switch model that you can use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning Cinema 4D quickly. 

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, importing reference images, adding lighting to the scene and basic rendering techniques.

In this, the first part of the two-part tutorial, I’ll show you:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the Switch

1. How to Import Reference Images

Step 1

To use the reference image in this tutorial, you will need to switch your viewport to the Front View

Use the middle mouse button to click anywhere on the viewport. This will display all four views—by default this will be perspective, top, right and front. From there, use the middle mouse button to select the Front View.

Cinema 4D 4 views
Cinema 4D 4 views

Step 2

In the Attributes tab select Mode > View Settings.

Select View Settings
Select View Settings

Step 3

In Viewport [Right] select the Back button and click on the button next to Image. 

Select the Back button
Select the Back button

Step 4

Select the reference image from the finder and open it. In this tutorial I’ll use the front view of a Nintendo Switch to help me.

Imported Nintendo Switch image in Cinema 4D
Imported Nintendo Switch image in Cinema 4D

Step 5

Once the image is displayed in the background of the viewport, you can change the transparency of the image to your liking. This sometimes makes it easier to model from the reference image.

You can also change the position and size of your reference image from here using Offset X, Offset Y, Size X and Size Y.

Note that the reference image will only appear when selecting front view from the viewport.

Adjust the transparency settings
Adjust the transparency settings

2. How to Create the Base Model

Step 1

To start modelling the main body of the Nintendo Switch, select the Cube object from the top menu bar. This will spawn a cube in the viewport.

Select the Cube object
Select the Cube object

Step 2

Use the reference image of the Nintendo Switch in the Front View to help adjust the cube.

Use the Scale Tool to make the shape of the cube match up with the shape of the Nintendo Switch in the image.

Ensure that you use the other views—front, left, right, perspective etc—to check that the shape looks correct from every angle.

Adjust the cube object to fit the reference image
Adjust the cube object to fit the reference image

Step 3

The shape of the cube should roughly fit the shape of the Nintendo Switch background image at this stage. 

Select the Move Tool. To duplicate this shape you’ll need to hold CTRL button on the keyboard and then click and drag one of the arrows using the mouse. In this case I’ve used the red arrow to drag the new object along the x-axis.

Duplicate object
Duplicate object

Step 4

Use the Scale Tool to adjust the shape of the cube to match up with the shape of the blue Joy-Con in the reference image.

Scale the cube object
Scale the cube object

Step 5

Use the Perspective View to move around the objects and make sure that the overall thickness of the base objects are correct. In the example below the objects are too thick, so the Scale Tool is used to reduce the thickness (click and drag along the z-axis).

Scale the width of the cube objects
Scale the width of the cube objects

3. How to Curve the Joy-Con Corners

Step 1

Ensure you have the object selected and then click on the Make Editable button to make the object editable. Select the Edge Selection button.

Select the Make Editable and Edge Selection buttons
Select the Make Editable and Edge Selection buttons

Step 2

Select the two left corners of the Joy-Con using the selection tool. The selected edges will be highlighted in orange.

Select edges
Select edges

Step 3

Once the edges have been selected, use the mouse to right click on the selected edges. In the menu that appears, find Bevel and select it.

Select Bevel
Select Bevel

Step 4

In the adjustment window (usually located in the bottom right of the screen), play around with the following:

  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer
  • Offset Mode: Fixed Distance
  • Offset: 50 cm
  • Subdivision: 20
  • Depth: 100%

Feel free to adjust the sliders and values until you are satisfied with the object’s appearance. You can also use the Front View and adjust corners to fit the reference image.

Curve the corners
Curve the corners

Step 5

To make visualising the Joy-Con in the view port easier, switch off the screen object by clicking on the small round grey button (until it turns red). This is located to the right of the screen object in the object manager list view.

Click on the button until it turns green (or grey) to make the object reappear again.

Select the red button
Select the red button

Step 6

With the screen object hidden from view it makes navigating around the Joy-Con a lot easier. Use the reference image in the front view to check the shape of the object.

Curve the corners
Curve the corners

Step 7

Select the final two corners of the Joy-Con using the Edge Selection tool.

Select the edges
Select the edges

Step 8

Once the edges have been selected, use the mouse to right click on the selected edges. In the menu that appears, find Bevel and select it. Use the Bevel too to curve the two remaining corners of the Joy-Con.

  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer
  • Offset Mode: Fixed Distance
  • Offset: 10cm
  • Subdivision: 10
  • Depth: 100%
Curve the corners
Curve the corners

4. How to Curve the Screen

Step 1

Select the screen object and click on the Make Editable button followed by the Edge Selection button. 

Ensure that the screen object is no longer hidden by clicking on the small round button in the object manager list view. 

Select the Make Editable and Edge Selection buttons
Select the Make Editable and Edge Selection buttons

Step 2

To make visualising the screen object in the viewport easier, switch off the Joy-Con object by clicking on the small round grey button (until it turns red). 

This is located to the right of the Joy-Con object in the object manager list view.

Click on the red button

Step 3

Once you click on the small round grey button the Joy-Con object should disappear from the viewport. 

Click on the button until it turns green (or grey) to make the object reappear again.

Front view adjustments
Front view adjustments

Step 4

Use the Edge Selection tool to select all four corners of the screen object.

Select the edges
Select the edges

Step 5

Once the edges have been selected, use the mouse to right click on the selected edges. In the menu that appears, find Bevel and select it.

Select Bevel
Select Bevel

Step 6

In the adjustment window (usually located in the bottom right of the screen), play around with the following:

  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer
  • Offset Mode: Fixed Distance
  • Offset: 15 cm
  • Subdivision: 10
  • Depth: 100%

Feel free to adjust the sliders and values until you are satisfied with the object’s appearance. 

You can also use the Front View and adjust corners to fit the reference image.

Curve the corners
Curve the corners

5. How to use Boole

Step 1

To create the top corners of the screen, use the Boole tool. To get started with this select the Cylinder object from the top menu bar. This will spawn a cylinder in the viewport.

Select the Cylinder object button
Select the Cylinder object button

Step 2

Use the Rotate Tool to rotate the cylinder 90 degrees in the z-axis.

Rotate the cylinder object
Rotate the cylinder object

Step 3

Use the Scale Tool to make the cylinder thinner.

Scale the Cylinder object
Scale the Cylinder object

Step 4

In the front view, duplicate the cylinder and use the reference image to position the cylinders to the top corners of the screen object.

Place the cylinder objects
Place the cylinder objects

Step 5

Both cylinder objects should completely cover the corners of the screen. Use the perspective view to move the cylinders into position.

Move the cylinder objects
Move the cylinder objects

Step 6

Once the cylinder objects are in position, select the Boole Tool from the top menu bar. 

Select the Boole Tool
Select the Boole Tool

Step 7

In the object manager list view, select both cylinder objects and group them (Alt-G). This will create a ‘Null’ group containing the selected objects.

Group objects together
Group objects together

Step 8

Move both the screen object and the Null object inside the Boole Tool. Make sure that the screen is positioned above the Null group.

Place objects inside the Boole
Place objects inside the Boole

Step 9

Once the objects have been placed within the Boole Tool, the cylinder object will be subtracted from the screen object. 

Create a cutout shape using Boole
Create a cutout shape using Boole

6. How to Create the Screen

Step 1

To duplicate the screen object, select the it from the object list (found within the Boole tool). Press the CTRL button on the keyboard and click and drag the object you want to duplicate. 

Make sure that the new screen object is outside the Boole tool.

Duplicate the screen
Duplicate the screen

Step 2

Use the Scale Tool to make the new screen object smaller.

Scale the screen
Scale the screen

Step 3

In the front view you can use the reference image to help adjust the size of the screen.

Check the front view
Check the front view

Step 4

Once you are satisfied with the size of the screen, use the Move Tool to move the object inside and just above the surface of the original screen object.

You can also use the Scale Tool to reduce the thickness of the shape so that it becomes thinner.

Scale the screen
Scale the screen

7. How to Create Joy-Con Details

Step 1

Isolate the Joy-Con object to make working in the viewport easier. One way you can do this, is by clicking on the small grey button next to the objects you wish to hide (as shown previously).

Joy-Con shape
Joy-Con shape

Step 2

Click on the small back arrow on the Cube button and select Cylinder from the list of options. This will spawn a cylinder in the scene.

Select the Cylinder object button
Select the Cylinder object button

Step 3

Rotate the new cylinder object in the x-axis using the Rotation Tool.

Rotate the Cylinder object
Rotate the Cylinder object

Step 4

Use the right view in the viewport to check the size of the cylinder. Then use the Scale Tool to reduce the size of the object so that it can easily fit within the width of the Joy-Con.

Scale the Cylinder object
Scale the Cylinder object

Step 5

You can also use the object properties to adjust the size of the cylinder and also the amount of segments it has.

  • Radius: 14 cm
  • Height: 200 cm
  • Height Segments: 1
  • Rotation Segments: 36
  • Orientation: +x
Adjust the object properties
Adjust the object properties

Step 6

With the new cylinder object selected, click on the Make Editable button.

Select the Make Editable button
Select the Make Editable button

Step 7

Use the Move Tool and combine it with the Points Selection Tool.

Select the Move Tool and the Points Selection Tool
Select the Move Tool and the Points Selection Tool

Step 8

In the options window, make sure that the box for ‘Only Select Visible Elements’ is not selected. This will ensure that you will select all the necessary points.

Untick Only Select Visible Elements button
Untick Only Select Visible Elements button

Step 9

Select the bottom half of the cylinder object.

Select half the Cylinder
Select half the Cylinder

Step 10

Use the Move Tool to move the selected points down and making the object longer.

Adjust object shape
Adjust object shape

Step 11

Use the Selection Tool to select the curved corners on the right of the cylinder shape.

Select corners
Select corners

Step 12

Use the Move Tool to move the selected points a little bit to the right to make the object slightly wider.

Adjust object shape
Adjust object shape

Step 13

Click on the Model Mode button on the left of the screen and move the shape to the center of the Joy-Con.

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 14

In the perspective view, use the Move Tool and the Scale Tool to adjust the shape so that it appears slightly above the side surface of the Joy-Con.

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 15

Create three more cylinder objects and move them into position using the Scale Tool and the Move Tool.

Create three additional cylinders
Create three additional cylinders

Step 16

Adjust the bottom cylinder using the Points Tool and the Selection Tool. Select the top half of cylinder and move the points up slightly.

Select the points
Select the points

Step 17

Return to Model Mode and adjust the shapes so that they resemble the image below.

Adjust the shape
Adjust the shape

Step 18

Use the perspective view to move the cylinder objects into position using the Move Tool. The cylinders should be placed within and just above the surface of the Joy-Con.

Move objects into position
Move objects into position

8. How to Duplicate Joy-Con

Step 1

Select all the objects related to the Joy-Con and group them (Alt-G). This will create a new ‘Null Group’.

Group objects together
Group objects together

Step 2

Select the Null group containing the Joy-Con and duplicate it (hold the CTRL button on the keyboard and use the Move Tool).

Duplicate grouped objects
Duplicate grouped objects

Step 3

Rotate the new Joy-Con object 180 degrees using the Rotation Tool.

Rotate Joy-Con
Rotate Joy-Con

Step 4

In the front view, use the reference image to move the new Joy-Con into position (above the red Joy-Con).

Place Joy-Con in the right position
Place Joy-Con in the right position

9. How to Create Buttons

Step 1

Select the Cylinder from the top menu.

Create a Cylinder object
Create a Cylinder object

Step 2

This will spawn a new cylinder object in the viewport. Use the Scale Tool to reduce the size of the cylinder so that it is the same size of the buttons shown in the reference image.

Scale the cylinder object down
Scale the cylinder object down

Step 3

Use the reference image to move the cylinder object into position. Then duplicate the cylinder object to create the other three buttons.

Create buttons
Create buttons

Step 4

Use the perspective view to move the buttons into position. The cylinders should be placed within and just above the surface of the Joy-Con.

Place the buttons
Place the buttons

Step 5

Group the buttons together (Alt-G) and duplicate the new Null object. Use the front view and use the reference image to move the new buttons into a new position above the red Joy-Con.

Duplicate the buttons
Duplicate the buttons

Step 6

Duplicate one of the cylinder buttons and place it into the Home Button position for the red Joy-Con. Once all the buttons have been placed correctly, unhide the red Joy-Con.

Unhide objects
Unhide objects

10. How to Create Joystick

Step 1

Click on the small back arrow on the Cube button and select Cylinder from the list of options. This spawns a cylinder in the scene.

Select the cylinder object
Select the cylinder object

Step 2

Use the Scale Tool to reduce the size of the cylinder so that it matches the size of the joystick.

Scale the cylinder object
Scale the cylinder object

Step 3

Use the Move Tool to move the cylinder into position (use the background reference image in the front view to help with this).

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 4

In the perspective view use the Scale Tool to reduce the thickness of the cylinder object (click and drag along the z-axis).

Scale the cylinder object
Scale the cylinder object

Step 5

Duplicate the cylinder object and use the Scale Tool to reduce the size. 

Scale the cylinder object
Scale the cylinder object

Step 6

Once you are happy with the reduced size of the cylinder, use the Scale Tool to increase the length of the cylinder in the z-axis.

Increase height of the cylinder
Increase height of the cylinder

Step 7

Move both cylinder objects into position above the surface of the Joy-Con. Once the joystick is in position, select the top cylinder and duplicate it.

Duplicate cylinder
Duplicate cylinder

Step 8

Move the new cylinder object into position just above the surface of the Joy-Con. This will act as the base of the joystick.

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 9

Duplicate one of the cylinders again and use the Scale Tool to reduce its size. Place the smaller cylinder just above the top of the joystick.

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 10

Use the Boolean Tool to create a cutaway using the two top cylinder objects. Ensure the smaller cylinder is placed below the larger cylinder when viewed in the object manager list view.

Use Boole Tool
Use Boole Tool

11. How to Create Extra Joy-Con Buttons

Step 1

In the top menu bar select the Cube to spawn a cube into the scene.

Create a cube object
Create a cube object

Step 2

Use the Scale Tool to adjust the cube to the same size as the Capture Button (use the reference image in the front view to help with this). 

Then use the Move Tool to move the cube into position.

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 3

Curve the corners of the cube using the Bevel Tool. 

Curve the corners
Curve the corners

Step 4

Use the Move Tool to place the cube object just above the surface of the Joy-Con.

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 5

Create a new cube object and curve the corners using the Bevel Tool. Click and drag using the mouse to adjust the size of the curve so that it almost resembles a circle.

Select the corners and curve them
Select the corners and curve them

Step 6

Use the Selection Tool to select half of the object and move it to the left to create the ‘-button’.

Select half of the object and adjust
Select half of the object and adjust

Step 7

In the perspective view, use the Move Tool to move the ‘- button’ into position just above the surface of the Joy-Con.

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 8

With all the buttons and the joystick in place, the Joy-Con should resemble the image shown below.

The Nintendo Joy-Con in 3D
The Nintendo Joy-Con in 3D

12. How to Duplicate Joystick

Step 1

Group the objects that make up the joystick by selecting them and pressing Alt-G on the keyboard. This will create a new ‘Null Object’.

Then duplicate the new ‘Null Object’ but holding the Ctrl button on the keyboard and click drag with the mouse using the Move Tool.

Duplicate joystick group
Duplicate joystick group

Step 2

Move the new joystick into position using the reference image in the front view.

Move object into position
Move object into position

13. How to Create + Button

Step 1

Duplicate the ‘- button’ and move it into position.

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 2

Duplicate the button and use the Rotate Tool and the Move Tool to create a cross shape for the ‘+ button’.

Create the cross button
Create the cross button

Step 3

Unhide the screen object. With all the buttons and both joysticks in place, the Nintendo Switch should finally be taking shape. 

Create a pose
Create a pose

14. How to Create Bottom Screen Details

Step 1

Duplicate the objects on the side of the Joy-Con and rotate it in the z-axis by 90 degrees.

Adjust the details
Adjust the details

Step 2

Move the group of objects to the bottom of the screen just above the surface. Once the ‘Null Object’ is in position, duplicate the group.

Add Nintendo Switch details
Add Nintendo Switch details

Step 3

Select the new group and rotate it 180 degrees. 

Rotate the objects
Rotate the objects

Step 4

Group both objects together and position them in the centre of the screen.

Final Nintendo Switch model in 3D
Final Nintendo Switch model in 3D

15. How to Pose Nintendo Switch

Step 1

Select all the objects associated with each Joy-Con and create separate groups for them. One group for the left Joy-Con and one group for the right Joy-Con.

Use the Move Tool to move each Joy-Con away from the screen slightly as shown in the image below.

Spread the Joy-Cons
Spread the Joy-Cons

Step 2

Move the right Joy-Con up in the y-axis slightly to create an interesting composition. Try out different positions by using the move tool and moving the camera around. 

Post the Nintendo Switch
Post the Nintendo Switch

Coming Next…

In the second part of the the tutorial series, I’ll show you how to:

  • Create Coloured Materials
  • Colour in the Nintendo Switch Model
  • Render the Nintendo Switch Model

How to Create a Smartwatch in Cinema 4D: Part 2

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a 3D Smartwatch model that you can use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning Cinema 4D quickly. 

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, importing reference images, adding lighting to the scene and basic rendering techniques.

In the first part of the two-part tutorial, I showed you how to:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the Smartwatch

In this, the second part of the the tutorial series, I’ll show you how to:

  • How to Create Coloured Materials
  • How to Add Lighting to the Scene
  • How to Render the Smartwatch

8. How to Create a New Material

Step 1

Located near the bottom of the screen there should be a material selection window. Click on Create > New Material to create a new material to use that you can edit. 

Materials are used to colour in the various objects and parts of the Smartwatch.

Create a new material

Step 2

Double click on the new material icon (displayed as a sphere). This brings up the Material Editor, where you adjust the various properties of the material such as the colour, transparency and reflectance. 

For this particular style you’ll only be interested in flat colour (Luminance).

Choose Luminance

Step 3

Tick the button for Luminance and untick the boxes for Colour and Reflectance. This will give us the cel shaded look for our final image of the Smartwatch.

Unticl Color and Reflectance

Step 4

Colour the Smartwatch, starting with the body, by adding the material to the object. Simply drag and drop the material to the object using the mouse. Drag and drop the material onto the object listed on the right of the screen. 

This process is repeated for the other parts of the Smartwatch. The base colour of the Smartwatch is as follows:

  • R: 201
  • G: 197
  • B: 198
Adjust the color

Step 5

Apply this material colour to the Smartwatch buttons as well

Add the material to the buttons

9. How to Adjust the Material Properties

Step 1

In the Material Editor, click on the arrow button next to Texture and select Sketch and Toon > Cel from the menu.

Choose Sketch and Toon

Step 2

Click on the new Cel button that appears next to Texture to bring up a new menu.

Click on the Cel button

Step 3

In the new menu, adjust the settings as follows:

  1. Change the Diffuse to match the image at below. It should be grey scale with the colour getting light from left to right.
  2. Untick Camera.
  3. Tick Lights.
  4. Tick Shadows 
  5. Select Multiply from the drop down menu.
Select Multiply

Step 4

Select a colour by double-clicking on the colour option box . 

The Material Editor gives you many different options for choosing and picking the colour. These include RGB, HSV etc. Choose whichever option you’re most familiar with as a flat colour. Because of the Multiply shading mode, the different colour shades also appears in the material.

If the material has already been applied to the model, the colour of the model is automatically adjusted to the new material colour. This is useful if you change your mind on a certain colour or a certain part of the Smartwatch model.

Use the Color Picker

Step 5

Because you’ve already applied the material to the model, the colour of the Smartwatch is automatically adjusted to the new material colour.

Adjusted material shown on watch

10. How to Adjust the Shading

Step 1

To get a  better idea of the shading and how our render will turn out as you work on it, click and hold on the Render Button and select Interactive Render Region from the menu. 

Choose Interactive Render Region

Step 2

Use the mouse to adjust the window so that it fits around the Smartwatch model. Look for the very small arrow on the right hand side of the window and use the mouse to drag it to the top right corner of the box (this increases the resolution). 

Decrease the resolution by moving the arrow down if you find that the performance is decreasing.

Increase the Resolution

Step 3

To change the way the light source is facing go to Options > Default Light.

Add a light object to the scene if you are more comfortable working that way. 

Change light source direction

Step 4

Change the light source in the Default Light window. Click where you’d like the light source to come from on the sphere and it’ll sync with the view port. Experiment with different lighting positions to come up with a lighting situation that you like. 

This is adjusted at anytime so you can change the lighting again if you changed your mind.

Click on the Default Light

11. Other Lighting Solutions

Step 1

To set up the basic lighting, go to the Floor button located in the top menu bar. Left Click-Hold and then select Physical Sky from the menu.

Choose Physical Sky

Step 2

Ensure that Physical Sky is selected in the menu on the right, a new menu appears on the bottom right of the screen. Select the Time and Location tab and choose a time using the left and right arrow keys. 

This changes the lighting of the scene (according to the time of the day). Choose a suitable time to light up the scene. You’ll see how the lighting affects the scene in the viewport.

Choose Time and Location

Step 3

To add a light to the scene, select the Add Light button in the top menu bar at the top of the screen.

This will create a Light Object which you can move around the scene. Move the light object using the Move Tool to a suitable position.

Select Light Object

Step 4

To customise the lighting further, experiment with the light object options in the bottom right of the screen. Here you can adjust the Intensity, Light Type and even Colour.

Adjust the Light Object

12. How to Colour the Smartwatch Screen

Step 1

To create a new material we can duplicate the material by holding CTRL on the keyboard and then using the mouse to click and drag the material to the side.

Duplicate the Material

Step 2

Double click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there change the colour to the following:

  • R: 56
  • G: 47
  • B: 66
Change the color of the Luminance

Step 3

Apply the new material to the screen by clicking and dragging it directly onto the object.

Color the Smartwatch screen

13. How to Colour the Smartwatch Wrist Strap

Step 1

Create a new material. Duplicate a previous material in order to keep the settings from before.

Double click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there change the colour to the following:

  • R: 70
  • G: 69
  • B: 65
Choose a new color for the wrist strap

Step 2

Apply the new material to both of the wrist straps by either clicking on the material and dragging it to the objects via the viewport or via the object list window.

Add material to the wrist strap

14. How to Render the Smartwatch

Step 1

On the top menu bar, click on the Render Settings button. This brings up the render settings window.

Click on Render Settings

Step 2

In the Render Settings menu, change the options to what you need. First you will need to tick the Save Settings to select a file location, file format and alpha channel.

Select Alpha Channel if you wish to keep the background see through. This is useful if you wish to add a background to the image in Adobe Photoshop.

Enter Save Settings

Step 3

In the Output Settings choose the resolution, height and width of the image. 

Enter Output Settings

Step 4

To ensure that the Smartwatch render is nice and sharp, go to the Anti-Aliasing settings. Select Cubic (Still Image) which can be found under Filter

Choose Cubic Still Image

Step 5

To create the final image of the Smartwatch, click on the Render button. Remember to make sure that you’ve selected the right view in your viewport (front, right, left or perspective etc.) and that you’re happy with the camera angle. 

Choose a suitable angle in the viewport by navigating around the scene.

Click on the Render button

Step 6

For more control over how the final render looks, create a camera object to help. Find a suitable view using the viewport first and then click on the camera button. 

This creates a camera using the current view in the viewport. Check out the camera settings to see how they will affect the final render.

Click on the Camera button

The End Result

Wait for the final render to finish. Once the render is complete, repeat the steps above and change the camera or the view port to create a new image from a different angle. 

Throughout the course of the project you’ve learnt how to:

  • Import Reference Images
  • Prepare for Modelling
  • Model an Smartwatch
  • Create Coloured Materials
  • Add Lighting to the Scene
  • Render the Smartwatch

Feel free to share your own creations below. You can also export your image into Adobe Photoshop to enhance it further or to use it as part of a larger image.

Final Smartwatch render

How to Create a Smartwatch in Cinema 4D: Part 1

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a 3D Smartwatch model that you can use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning Cinema 4D quickly. 

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, importing reference images, adding lighting to the scene and basic rendering techniques.

In this, the first part of the two-part tutorial, I’ll show you:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the Smartwatch

1. How to Import Reference Images

Step 1

Use the middle mouse button to click anywhere on the viewport. This displays all four views. From there, use the middle mouse button to select the Right view.

Cinema 4D views

Step 2

In the Attributes tab select Mode > View Settings.

View settings

Step 3

In Viewport [Right] select the Back button and click on the button next to Image. 

Choose back button

Step 4

Select the reference image from the finder and open it.

Reference image displayed

Step 5

Once the image is displayed in the background of the viewport, change the transparency of the image. This can sometimes make it easier to model from the reference image.

Change the position and size of the reference image from here using Offset X, Offset Y, Size X and Size Y.

Adjust the transparency

2. How to Model the Watch Face

Step 1

To start modelling the face of the Smartwatch, select the Cube object from the top menu bar. This spawns a cube in the viewport.

Select Cube from the menu

Step 2

Use the reference image of the Smartwatch in the Front View to help adjust the cube. 

Use the Scale Tool to make the shape of the cube match up with the shape of the Smartwatch in the image.

Ensure that you use the other views (front, left, right, perspective etc) to check that the shape looks correct from every angle.

Transform the cube to fit reference image

Step 3

With the object still selected, use the mouse to click the Make Editable button to allow you to adjust the model further.

Clicking the Make Editable button disables the options for when you first spawn the object.

Because of this you must make sure that you are happy with the current shape of the cube before clicking this button.

Select the Make Editable button

Step 4

Select the Edge Selection Tool.

Edge Selection Tool button

Step 5

Use the Edge Selection Tool to select all four corners of the object. The selected edges are highlighted in orange.

Select the edge corners of the cube

Step 6

Once the edges have been selected, use the mouse to right click on the selected edges. In the menu that appears, find Bevel and select it.

Select the Bevel Tool

Step 7

In the adjustment window (usually located in the bottom right of the screen), play around with the following:

  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer
  • Offset Mode: Fixed Distance
  • Offset: 50cm
  • Subdivision: 10
  • Depth: 100%

Feel free to adjust the sliders and values until you are satisfied with the object’s appearance.

Curve the corners of the cube

Step 8

In the images below you can see how the edges are effected once the values have been changed.

Use the reference image of the Smartwatch in the Front View to help whilst you adjust the corners. 

Use reference image

Step 9

Click on the small black arrow in the bottom right corner of the Bend Tool in the top menu bar. Select Bevel from the list. This creates a Bevel tool in the list of objects on the right of the screen.

Choose Bevel button from top menu

Step 10

Select the Bevel tool and drag it into the Cube object. This will apply the bevel features to the cube.

Bevel in listed view

Step 11

Ensuring that the Bevel tool is selected in the object list, use the adjustments window to change the way that the bevel works. 

For this tutorial, the following are used:

  • Use Angle: Tick
  • Angle Threshold: 68 Degrees
  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer
  • Offset Mode: Radial
  • Offset: 20cm
  • Subdivision: 6

Feel free to adjust the sliders and values until you are satisfied with the object’s appearance.

Adjust the Bevel object settings

Step 12

In the images below you can see how the cube is changed once the values have been changed. This makes the object appear smoother, which correctly matches the appearance of the Smartwatch which is being modelled.

Curved edges

Step 13

For a more stylised and graphical approach, reduce the Bevel Subdivisions to a value of 1.

Simplified edges

Step 14

This gives the Smartwatch a sharper bevel for a more stylised look. However, if you’re going for a more realistic look with a smoother bevel, increase the number of Bevel Subdivisions instead.

Low Poly watch face

3. How to Create the Smartwatch Screen

Step 1

To start modelling the screen of the Smartwatch, duplicate the current object from the list view. Do this by holding CTRL on the keyboard to click and drag a duplicate object.

Duplicate the watch face

Step 2

Remove the Bevel Modifier from the duplicate object.

Remove Bevel

Step 3

Use the Scale Tool to adjust the thickness of the new object.

Ensure that you use the other views (front, left, right, perspective etc) to check that the shape looks correct from every angle.

Scale watch face

Step 4

Once the shape and size of the cube has been adjusted correctly, use the Move Tool to move the screen into position.

Move object into position

4. How to Create the Smartwatch Buttons

Step 1

Click on the small back arrow on the Cube button and select Cylinder from the list of options. This will spawn a Cylinder in the scene.

Select Cylinder from top menu

Step 2

Adjust the properties of the Cylinder so that it is facing the correct way, has the correct size and has the desired thickness for the button. 

Use the Move Tool to move the button into the correct place using the background image as the reference. 

The settings for the Cylinder are as follows:

  • Radius: 25cm
  • Height: 25cm
  • Height Segments: 1
  • Rotation Segments: 36
  • Orientation: -X
Place button

Step 3

Ensure that the cylinder is selected and click on the Make Editable Button. 

Choose Make Editable Button

Step 4

Duplicate the cylinder. This acts as the second button.

Duplicate button

Step 5

Now that the object is editable, edit the points. Ensure the second cylinder object is selected and click on Points Button. 

Click on the Rectangle Selection Tool to select the points to edit. Select the points to then move them using the Move Tool.

Select Points Tool

Step 6

Use the Rectangle Selection Tool to select half of the cylinder. Then use the Move Tool to move the points down.

Adjust points

Step 7

To move the two buttons into position, when moving a whole object, select and use the Model button. If this is not selected, you may find that you’ll be moving the points, edges or faces instead.

Select Model button

Step 8

Use the Move Tool to move the two buttons into position.

Move new button into position

Step 9

Ensure that you use the other camera views to ensure that the button placement is correct and moved to the right area.

Check all views

5. How to Create the Watch Strap

Step 1

To start modelling the wrist strap of the Smartwatch, select the Cube object from the top menu bar. 

This spawns a cube in the viewport.

Choose Cube object from menu

Step 2

Adjust the properties of the cube so that it resembles the appearance of a wrist strap. This is usually represented as a very long rectangular shape. 

The settings for the strap are as follows:

  • Size X: 230 cm
  • Size Y: 1000 cm
  • Size Z: 45 cm
Adjust cube to make strap shape

Step 3

In order for the shape to bend correctly, width segments must be added to the object. For a smoother bend more segments should be added (Y).

Add segments to watch strap

6. How to use the Bend Deformer 

Step 1

In order to create a suitable bend to the wrist strap you will need to use the Bend Deformer. Select the Bend button from the top menu bar. 

This spawns a bend deformer object in the list view.

Select Bender deformer from menu

Step 2

In the list view move the Bend Deformer into the watch strap object. This means that the deformer will affect and influence the watch strap object only.

Move bend deformer in list menu

Step 3

With the Bend Deformer selected make sure that Fit to Parent has been ticked. The ensures that the deformer affects the whole watch strap.

Click fit to Parent

Step 4

With the Bend Deformer still selected, go to the parameters box and play around with the Strength

In this tutorial I used the following settings:

  • Strength: 180
  • Angle: 90
Adjust Bend Derformer parameters

Step 5

In the list view, select the watch strap object again and use the Rotate and Move tools to move it to the correct position on the smart watch.

Move and rotate strap into place

7. How to Complete the Watch Strap

Step 1

In order to edit the watch strap further click the Make Editable button on the top left corner of the screen.

Select Make Editable button

Step 2

Choose the Polygon Tool and use the Move Tool to extend the tip of the watch strap. 

You’ll also notice that by going into an edit mode like this disables the Bend Deformer temporarily. 

Use Polygon Tool

Step 3

Once you return to Model Mode by clicking on the model button, the strap appears as normal with the extended geometry.

Return to Model Mode

Step 4

Choose the Edge Tool from the left menu.

Choose Edge Tool

Step 5

Use the Edge Tool and the Selection Tool to select the edges of the extended strap.

Select watch strap edges

Step 6

With the edges still selected, use the Bevel Tool to curve the edges.

Select the Bevel Tool

Step 7

In the edit window, change the settings to the following:

  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer 
  • Offset Mode: Fixed Distance
  • Offset: 72 cm
  • Subdivision: 30
  • Depth: 100%
Bevel the corners of the watch strap

Step 8

Return to Model Mode to see how the watch strap looks and finalise any further adjustments you’d like to make. 

Once you’re happy with the way it looks, duplicate the watch strap. Do this by holding CTRL on the keyboard to click and drag a duplicate object.

Rotate the duplicate strap by 180 degrees and place it on the bottom of the watch.

Duplicate watch strap

Coming Next…

Final smart watch 3D model

In the second part of the tutorial series, I’ll show you:

  • How to Create Coloured Materials
  • How to Add Lighting to the Scene
  • How to Render the Smartwatch

How to Create an iPhone in Cinema 4D: Part 2

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a 3D iPhone model to use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning Cinema 4D quickly. 

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, importing reference images, adding lighting to the scene and basic rendering techniques.

In the first part of the two-part tutorial, I showed you how to:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the iPhone

In this, the second part of the the tutorial series, I’ll show you how to:

  • How to Create Coloured Materials
  • How to Add Lighting to the Scene
  • How to Render the iPhone

9. How to Create a New Material

Step 1

Located near the bottom of the screen there is a material selection window. Click on Create > New Material to create a new material to use that you can edit. 

Materials are used to colour in the various objects and parts of the iPhone.

Select New Material from the menu
Select New Material from the menu

Step 2

Double click on the new material icon (displayed as a sphere). This will bring up the Material Editor, where you can adjust the various properties of the material such as the colour, transparency and reflectance. 

For this particular style we will only be interested in flat colour (Luminance).

Open the Material Editor
Open the Material Editor

Step 3

Tick the button for Luminance and untick the boxes for Colour and Reflectance. This will give the cel shaded look for the final image. 

Select Luminance
Select Luminance

Step 4

Colour the iPhone body by adding the material to the object. Drag and drop the material to the object using the mouse. You can also drag and drop the material onto the object listed on the right of the screen. 

Drag new material on to the 3D model
Drag new material on to the 3D model

10. How to Adjust the Material Properties

Step 1

In the Material Editor, click on the arrow button next to Texture and select Sketch and Toon > Cel from the menu.

Select Sketch and Toon and Cel from the menu
Select Sketch and Toon and Cel from the menu

Step 2

Click on the new Cel button that appears next to Texture to bring up a new menu.

Click on the Cel button
Click on the Cel button

Step 3

In this new menu, adjust the settings as follows:

  1. Change the Diffuse to match the image at below. It should be grey scale with the colour getting light from left to right.
  2. Untick Camera.
  3. Tick Lights.
  4. Tick Shadows 
  5. Select Multiply from the drop down menu.
Adjust the settings in the editor
Adjust the settings in the editor

Step 4

Select a colour by double-clicking on the colour option box . 

The Material Editor gives many different options for choosing and picking colours. These include RGB, HSV and so on. Choose whichever option you are most familiar with as a flat colour. Because of the Multiply shading mode, the different colour shades will also appear in the material.

If the material has already been applied to the model, the colour of the model will automatically be adjusted to the new material colour. This is useful if you change your mind on a certain colour or a certain part of the iPhone model.

Pick a colour
Pick a colour 

Step 5

Because we’ve already applied the material to the model, the colour of the iPhone will automatically be adjusted to the new material colour.

The new material is applied

11. How to Adjust the Shading

Step 1

To get a  better idea of the shading and how our render will turn out as we work on it, click and hold on the Render Button and select Interactive Render Region from the menu. 

Select Interactive Render Region
Select Interactive Render Region

Step 2

Use the mouse to adjust the window so that it fits around the iPhone model. Look for the very small arrow on the right hand side of the window and use the mouse to drag it to the top right corner of the box (this increases the resolution). 

Decrease the resolution by moving the arrow down if you find that the performance is decreasing.

Adjust the resolution
Adjust the resolution

Step 3

To change the way the light source is facing go to Options > Default Light.

You can also add a light object to the scene if you are more comfortable working that way.  

Select default light
Select default light

Step 4

Change the light source in the Default Light window. Click where you’d like the light source to come from on the sphere and it will sync with the view port. Experiment with different lighting positions to come up with a lighting situation that you like. 

This can be adjusted at anytime so you can change the lighting again if you changed your mind.

Change the lighting direction
Change the lighting direction

Step 5

Secondary-click on the arrow and select Alpha Mode in order to reveal the rest of the viewport. Some people may find working this way easier.

Select Alpha Mode
Select Alpha Mode

12. Other Lighting Solutions

Step 1

To set up the basic lighting, go to the Floor button located in the top menu bar. Primary-Click-Hold and then select Physical Sky from the menu.

Select Physical Sky
Select Physical Sky

Step 2

Make sure that Physical Sky is selected in the menu on the right, a new menu will appear on the bottom right of the screen. Select the Time and Location tab and choose a time using the left and right arrow keys. 

This will change the lighting of the scene (according to the time of the day). Choose a suitable time to light up the scene. You’ll see how the lighting affects the scene in the viewport.

Select a Time
Select a Time 

Step 3

To add a light to the scene, select the Add Light button in the top menu bar at the top of the screen.

This creates a Light Object which you can move around the scene. Move the light object using the Move Tool to a suitable position.

Select the Add Light Button
Select the Add Light Button

Step 4

To customise the lighting further, experiment with the light object options in the bottom right of the screen. Here you can adjust the Intensity, Light Type and even Colour.

Light Object adjustments
Light Object adjustments

13. How to Colour the iPhone Screen

Step 1

To create a new material we can duplicate the material by holding CTRL on the keyboard and then using the mouse to click and drag the material to the side.

Duplicate material
Duplicate material

Step 2

Double-click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there we can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 56
  • G: 47
  • B: 66
Choose a new colour
Choose a new colour

Step 3

Apply the new material to the screen by clicking and dragging it directly onto the object.

Apply material to model
Apply material to model

14. How to Colour the iPhone Details

Step 1

Create a new material. You can also duplicate a previous material in order to keep the settings from before.

Double-click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there we can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 70
  • G: 69
  • B: 65
Choose a new colour
Choose a new colour

Step 2

Apply the new material to the button objects inside the cutout group. You can also apply the material by clicking and dragging it to the object in the viewport.

Apply material to objects in list view
Apply material to objects in list view

Step 3

When the material is applied, the details will change colour to reflect the material.

Apply new material to iPhone details
Apply new material to iPhone details

Step 4

Repeat the same steps for the side buttons. For the side buttons, use the same colour material which was used for the iPhone body.

Apply new material to iPhone buttons
Apply new material to iPhone buttons

Step 5

For the back camera details, use the dark grey colour. Remember that you can change the colour of the material at a later date as well.

Apply new material to iPhone camera
Apply new material to iPhone camera

15. How to Render the iPhone

Step 1

On the top menu bar, click on the Render Settings button. This brings up the render settings window.

Click on the Render Settings button
Click on the Render Settings button

Step 2

In the render settings menu, you can change the options to what you need. First, tick the Save Settings to select a file location, file format and alpha channel.

Select Alpha Channel if you wish to keep the background see through.

Save settings
Save settings

Step 3

In the Output Settings choose the resolution, height and width of the image. 

Output settings
Output settings

Step 4

To ensure that the render is nice and sharp go to the Anti-Aliasing settings. Select Cubic (Still Image) which can be found under Filter. 

Anti-Aliasing settings
Anti-Aliasing settings

Step 5

To create the final image, click on the Render button. Remember to select the right view in the viewport (front, right, left or perspective etc.) and that you’re happy with the camera angle. 

Choose a suitable angle in the viewport by navigating around the scene.

Click on the Render button
Click on the Render button

Step 6

If you want to have more control over how your final render looks, create a camera object to help. Find a suitable view using the viewport first and then click on the camera button. 

This will create a camera using the current view in the viewport. Check out the camera settings to see how they affect the final render.

Click on the Camera button
Click on the Camera button

The End Result

Wait for the final render to finish. Once the render is complete you can repeat the steps above and change the camera or the view port to create a new image from a different angle. 

Throughout the course of the project you have successfully learnt how to:

  • Import Reference Images
  • Prepare for Modelling
  • Model an iPhone
  • Create Materials
  • Colour the Model
  • Render the iPhone

Feel free to share your own creations below. You can also export your image into Adobe Photoshop to enhance it further or to use it as part of a larger image.

Final iPhone render
Final iPhone render

How to Create an iPhone in Cinema 4D: Part 1

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a 3D iPhone model that you can use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning Cinema 4D quickly. 

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, importing reference images, adding lighting to the scene and basic rendering techniques.

In this, the first part of the two-part tutorial, I’ll show you how to:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the iPhone

1. How to Import Reference Images

Step 1

Use the middle mouse button to click anywhere on the viewport. This will display all four views. From there, use the middle mouse button to select the Right view.

Cinema 4D viewports

Step 2

In the Attributes tab select Mode > View Settings.

Select view settings

Step 3

In Viewport [Right] select the Back button and click on the button next to Image. 

Select the back tab

Step 4

Select the reference image from the finder and open it.

Reference image displayed in the viewport

Step 5

Once the image is displayed in the background of the viewport, you can change the transparency of the image. This can sometimes make it easier to model from the reference image.

You can also change the position and size of your reference image from here using Offset X, Offset Y, Size X and Size Y.

Adjust transparency of the image

2. How to Model the Body of the iPhone

Step 1

To start modelling the body of the iPhone, select the Cube object from the top menu bar. This will spawn a cube in the viewport.

Select cube object from the menu

Step 2

You can use the reference image of the iPhone in your Front View to help adjust the cube. Use the Scale Tool to make the shape of the cube match up with the shape of the iPhone in the image.

Make sure that you use the other views (front, left, right, perspective etc) to check that your shape looks correct from every angle.

Resize the cube object using the Scale Tool

Step 3

With the object still selected, use the mouse to click the Make Editable button. This enables you to adjust the model further, but disables the options for when you first spawn the object.

Select the Make Editable button

Step 4

Select the Edge Selection Tool.

Select the Edge Selection Tool

Step 5

Use the Edge Selection Tool to select all four corners of the object. The selected edges will be highlighted in orange.

Select the corners of the object

Step 6

Once the edges have been selected, use the mouse to right click on the selected edges. In the menu that appears, find Bevel and select it.

Select the Bevel Tool

Step 7

In the adjustment window (usually located in the bottom right of the screen), play around with the following:

  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer
  • Offset Mode: Fixed Distance
  • Offset: 31cm
  • Subdivision: 10
  • Depth: 100%

Feel free to adjust the sliders and values until you are satisfied with the object’s appearance.

Adjust the bevel settings

Step 8

In the images below you can see how the edges are effected once the values have been changed.

Demonstration of the bevel tool

Step 9

Click on the small black arrow in the bottom right corner of the Bend Tool in the top menu bar. Then select Bevel from the list. This will create a Bevel tool in the list of objects on the right of the screen.

Select the Bevel tool from the menu

Step 10

Select the Bevel tool and drag it into the Cube object. This will apply the bevel features to the cube.

Rearrange the objects

Step 11

Making sure that the Bevel tool is selected in the object list, use the adjustments window to change the way that the bevel works. For this tutorial, the following will be used:

  • Use Angle: Tick
  • Angle Threshold: 68 Degrees
  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer
  • Offset Mode: Radial
  • Offset: 8cm
  • Subdivision: 6

Feel free to adjust the sliders and values until you are satisfied with the object’s appearance.

Adjust the bevel tool sliders

Step 12

In the images below you can see how the cube is effected once the values have been changed. This makes the object appear smoother, which correctly matches the appearance of an iPhone 8.

Smoothing the edges of the iPhone

Step 13

For a more stylised and graphical approach we can reduce the Bevel Subdivisions to a value of 1.

Reduce the bevel subdivisions

Step 14

This will give the iPhone a sharper bevel for a more stylised look.

3D body of the iPhone

3. How to Create the iPhone Screen

Step 1

To start modelling the screen of the iPhone, select the Cube object from the top menu bar. This will spawn a cube in the viewport.

Select cube object from the menu

Step 2

Use the reference image of the iPhone in your Front View to help adjust the cube. Use the Scale Tool to make the shape of the cube match up with the shape of the iPhone screen in the image.

Make sure that you use the other views (front, left, right, perspective etc) to check that your shape looks correct from every angle.

Resize the cube object using the Scale Tool

Step 3

Once the shape and size of the cube has been adjusted correctly, use the Move Tool to move the screen into position. 

Place the screen object inside the iPhone body

4. How to Create iPhone Home Button

Step 1

To start modelling the home button of the iPhone, select the Cone object from the top menu bar. This will spawn a cone in the viewport.

Select the cone object from the menu

Step 2

Use the Rotate Tool to rotate the cone by 90 degrees. Ensure that the pointed tip is pointing towards the iPhone.

You can also reduce the height of the cone and the increase the radius of the tip. This helps make the positioning of the button a little bit easier.

Rotate the cone using the rotate tool

Step 3

Use the reference image and the Scale Tool to adjust the cone so that it roughly fits the size of the iPhone home button.

Resize the cone

Step 4

Switch to Perspective View and use the Move Tool to place the cone object in the position where the iPhone home button will be.

Place the cone on the model

5. How to use Boole

Step 1

Click on the small black arrow in the bottom right corner of the Array Tool in the top menu bar. Then select Boole from the list. This will create a Boole tool in the list of objects on the right of the screen.

Select the boole tool from the menu

Step 2

Select the cone and body objects from the list and place them inside the Boole Tool. Ensure that the cone object is positioned below the iPhone body.

Rearrange the objects menu

Step 3

This will create a cut out in the shape of the cone object. You can then adjust the position of the cone object using the Move Tool until you’re happy with the appearance of the home button.

Create the iPhone home button

Step 4

Ensure that the cone object is selected and select Phong in the adjustments window. Change the Phong Angle to 45 Degrees. This will adjust the smoothing groups of the home button so that they appear correctly.

Adjust phong angel

6. How to use Boole to Create the iPhone Details

Step 1

Use the shape object creations tools (cylinder, cone, cube, tube etc) to create the extra details for the iPhone. This will include things like the camera lens and the phone receiver.

Create the iPhone details

Step 2

Select all the new objects (holding shift) and press Alt-G on the keyboard. This will group the objects into a null group. Make sure that the null group is positioned inside the Boole and below the body object.

Rearrange the objects menu

Step 3

This will create a cut out in the shape of the objects you initially created. You can then adjust the position of the objects using the Move Tool until you are happy with the appearance.

Use boole to create the details

7. How to Create the iPhone Buttons

Step 1

Use the shape object creations tools (cylinder, cone, cube, tube etc) to create the extra buttons for the iPhone. This will include things like the volume and power buttons.

Place the iPhone buttons

Step 2

Use the Move Tool and the Rotation Tool to place the buttons in the correct position on the iPhone.

Duplicate and place the iPhone buttons

Step 3

You can use the different viewports (left, right, front, perspective) to aid you in positioning the buttons in the correct place. 

Don’t forget that the reference image can be used to guide you at this stage as well.

Use the move tool to place the buttons on the iPhone

8. How to Create the iPhone Camera

Step 1

Use the shape creation tools to create shapes for the iPhone camera. The cylinder shapes will be used to create the holes via the Boolean tool. Remember to use the reference image to help measure the size and placement.

Create objects for the iPhone camera

Step 2

Ensure that the viewport is looking at the back of the iPhone model. You can use the Rotate Tool to rotate the camera shapes 180 degrees if needed. Use the Move Tool to place the shapes correctly on the body of the iPhone. 

The shapes must be placed within the body of the iPhone in order for the Boolean to work correctly (for the camera holes).

Use the rotate and move tool to place the objects on the iPhone

Step 3

Select both of the camera holes (shown as the cone shapes named 01.1 and 02.1 in the image). In the object list, move them so that they are inside the Boole group (created for the previous cutouts in section 5 and 6). 

All the cutout objects must be placed underneath the iPhone body object in order to work.

Rearrange the objects menu

Step 4

Once the shapes have been placed inside the Boole group, the holes should appear correctly inside the iPhone body.

Use boole to create the holes on the iPhone

Step 5

Use the same techniques as above to create the other holes on the iPhone.

Create two more cones and place them on top of the rounded camera shape.

Place the camera objects

Step 6

You’ll need to create a new boole group for the new holes to appear because we are using a new object to cut holes into (instead of the iPhone body). 

Select boole from the menu

Step 7

Create a new boole group by placing the objects inside the boole (the cones must be placed below the shape that you want to cut holes out from).

Use boole to cut holes in the camera

Coming Next…

In the second part of the the tutorial series, I’ll show you how to:

  • How to Create Coloured Materials
  • How to Add Lighting to the Scene
  • How to Render the iPhone
The final iPhone 3D model

How to Create an Abstract Icon Set in Adobe Illustrator

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Welcome to how to create an abstract icon set in Adobe Illustrator! The theme we’re working on will be chess. In this tutorial we will learn the step by step process of how to create an abstract set of icons using basic shapes and tools.

For more examples of abstract icon sets, check out GraphicRiver where you can find a wide variety of different abstract icons.

1. How to Set Up a New Project File

Step 1

Let’s get started by setting up a New Document in Adobe Illustrator (File > New or Control-N). For this tutorial, we will use the settings below:

  • Number of Artboards: 1
  • Width: 850 px
  • Height: 850 px
  • Units: Pixels

In the Advanced tab, use the following settings:

  • Colour Mode: RGB
  • Raster Effects: Screen (72ppi)
  • Preview Mode: Default
Create a new project settings

Step 2

Go to Edit > Preferences > General and set the Keyboard Increment to 1 px

Edit project preferences

Step 3

Go to Units and use the settings shown below. 

  • General: Pixel
  • Stroke: Points
  • Type: Points
Edit units in project preferences

2. How to Set Up the Layers

Step 1

Next, you will need to structure the project by creating layers. Select the Layers panel and create two layers. Name them as follows:

  • Layer 1: Background
  • Layer 2: Icons
Set up the project layers in Adobe Illustrator

Step 2

Make sure that you select the background layer to begin creating the background.

Select the Background layer

3. How to Create the Background Color

Step 1

With the background layer selected, click on the Rectangle Tool (M) and create a 850 x 850 rectangular area to place your icons in. This should fit the entire area of the Artboard.

Use the Rectangle Tool to create a 850 x 850 box

Step 2

Make sure that the rectangle is still selected, and click on the Gradient Tool. In the angle section, select 45 Degrees from the drop-down menu.

Edit the gradient angle to 45 degrees

Step 3

Select two colors for the gradient. For this tutorial, we will use the following:

  • R: 70
  • G: 82
  • B: 162
Adjust the left gradient color

Step 4

For the second color, we will use the following:

  • R: 138
  • G: 105
  • B: 173
Adjust the right gradient color

Step 5

The final background should look like the image below. Lock the background layer by clicking on the lock icon, and click on the icon layer to start creating the icons. 

The final gradient background

4. How to Create a Pawn Icon

Step 1

Choose the Pen Tool (P) and adjust the settings of stroke to the following:

  • Stroke Weight: 6
  • Cap: Round Cap
  • Corner: Miter Join
  • Align Stroke: Align Stroke to Center
Edit the Stroke Settings

Step 2

Start by selecting the Ellipse Tool (L) and creating a small circle. To create a perfect circle, press and hold the Shift key on the keyboard whilst clicking and dragging with the mouse.

Use the Ellipse Tool to create a small circle

Step 3

Select the Pen Tool (P) and create two lines underneath the circle.

Use the Pen Tool to create two lines

Step 4

Select the Rounded Rectangle Tool (M) and create a shape underneath the two lines. You can adjust the curvature of the corners by pressing the Up Arrow or the Down Arrow on your keyboard whilst creating the shape (clicking and dragging with the mouse).

With the shape still selected, change it to a fill shape.

Use the Rounded Rectangle Tool to create a shape

Step 5

Duplicate the shape by copying it (Control-C) and then paste it into place (Control-Shift-V)

Add a stroke to the second shape with a width of 20 pt. For the best results, align the stroke to the outside. 

Duplicate the round rectangle shape and add a stroke to it

Step 6

With the second shape still selected, go to the top menu and select Object > Expand to open the Expand window. Make sure both Fill and Stroke are selected, and then click OK.

Expand the stroke and the shape

Step 7

This will create a shape from the stroke. Make sure that the shape is still selected and, using the Pathfinder, click on Unite. This will merge the shape.

Combine the shapes using the unite button in pathfinder

Step 8

Change the shape to a stroke by using the Eyedropper Tool (I) and align the stroke to the outside.

Create a new stroke using the eyedropper tool

Step 9

Use the Ellipse Tool (L) to create a small circle at the bottom to complete the pawn icon.

Use the Ellipse Tool to create a small circle

5. How to Create a Rook Icon

Step 1

To start creating the rook icon, use the Rectangle Tool (M) to create a small rectangle shape.

Use the Rectangle Tool to create a small shape

Step 2

Create a slightly larger rectangle shape and set it to Stroke by using the Eyedropper Tool and selecting one of the strokes we used previously on the pawn icon. 

Create a larger rectangle and set it to stroke

Step 3

Use the Rectangle Tool (M) to create a small rectangle shape at the top. Then use the Ellipse Tool (L) to create a small circle at the bottom (holding the Shift key on the keyboard to create a perfect circle). 

Add a rectangle and a circle shape

Step 4

Use the Rectangle Tool (M) and follow the steps below to create the top of the rook icon.

Use the Rectangle Tool to create the Rook Icon

Step 5

Select all the shapes in Step 4 and click on Pathfinder > Unite.

Click on the Unite button in Pathfinder

Step 6

This will merge all the shapes together.

The Unite button will merge the shapes together

Step 7

With the new shape selected, change it into a stroke by using the Eyedropper Tool (I) to ensure that the weight of the stroke is the same.

Use the Eyedropper Tool to change copy the stroke settings

Step 8

To create the semicircles, you need to start by creating a circle using the Ellipse Tool (L). Place a rectangle over the circle using the Rectangle Tool (M).

Create a rectangle on top of a circle

Step 9

Select both the shapes (making sure that the rectangle is arranged on top of the circle) and then select Pathfinder > Minus Front.

Click on the Minus Front button

Step 10

This will remove the rectangle shape and the part of the circle which is overlapping.

Minus front removes any overlapping shapes

Step 11

Duplicate the semicircle by copying it (Control-C) and then pasting it (Control-V).

Duplicate the new semi circle

Step 12

Select the duplicate semicircle and then Right-Click on it. From the menu, select Transform > Select. Choose Vertical axis at 90 Degrees and then click OK.

Reflect the duplicate semi circle vertically

Step 13

Make sure that both semicircles are aligned horizontally opposite each other.

Make sure both shapes are opposite each other

Step 14

Place the semicircles on either side of the shapes to complete the rook icon.

Combine the shapes to create the Rook Icon

6. How to Create a Knight Icon

Step 1

To start creating the knight icon, create a duplicate of the rook icon. With the duplicate icon, use the Selection Tool (V) or the Direct Selection Tool (A) to remove the middle shapes of the icon.

Duplicate Rook icon and remove some shapes

Step 2

Use the Polygon Tool to create a triangle. Whilst using the Polygon Tool, press the Up Arrow key or Down Arrow key on the keyboard to increase or decrease the number of sides. 

To create an equilateral triangle, press and hold the Shift key on the keyboard whilst creating the shape.

Create a smaller equilateral triangle and place it in the middle.

Create two triangles using the Polygon Tool

Step 3

Rotate the semicircles on either side of the triangle so that the strokes align diagonally (Right Click > Transform > Rotate).

Rotate the semi circles to align with the triangle

Step 4

To create the head of knight icon, use the Rounded Rectangle Tool and the Ellipse Tool (L) to create the shapes below.

Use the Rounded Rectangle Tool and Ellipse Tool

Step 5

Use the Rectangle Tool (M) and place two rectangles above the shapes as shown below.

Place two rectangles above the new shapes

Step 6

Use the Minus Front Tool on the overlapping shapes. 

Click on the Minus Front button

Step 7

This will create a straight edge where the shapes used to overlap. Move the two shapes together so that they resemble the image below.

Move the semi circle inside the larger shape

Step 8

Use the Minus Front Tool again to remove the left side of the shape and change them both into a stroke.

Delete half the shape and change it to a stroke

Step 9

Select both shapes and use Pathfinder > Unite to combine them into a single shape.

Combine the strokes using the Unite button

Step 10

Select the Add Anchor Point Tool (+) and add a point near the left corner of the shape. Then use the Direct Selection Tool (A) to drag the top left corner to the left to create the ear.

Add an anchor point and edit it

Step 11

Use the Direct Selection Tool (A) and remove the point shown in the image below.

Delete an anchor point

Step 12

Use the Pen Tool (P) and draw out three extra points on the right side of the shape.

Use the Pen Tool to draw the neck of the horse

Step 13

Select the curve points and drag them to the middle using the mouse to create the neck of the horse. Hold the Shift key on the keyboard to select multiple points.

Use the curve points to round out the corners

Step 14

Once you are happy with the way the horse head looks, use the Ellipse Tool (L) to create the eye (remember to press and hold the Shift key on the keyboard to create a perfect circle).

Use the Ellipse Tool to create the eye

Step 15

Add a line underneath the head and position it underneath the previous shapes to create the final knight icon.

Add the horse head to create the final Knight Icon

7. How to Create a Bishop Icon

Step 1

To start creating the bishop icon, create a duplicate of the knight icon. With the duplicate icon, use the Selection Tool (V) or the Direct Selection Tool (A) to remove the top shapes (the horse head) of the icon.

Delete the horse head from the duplicate icon

Step 2

Use the Ellipse Tool (L) and hold the Shift key on the keyboard to create a perfect circle on top of the icon.

Add a circle using the Ellipse Tool

Step 3

Use the Direct Selection Tool (A) to move the top point of the circle slightly upwards. This will create an egg-like shape.

Use the Direct Selection Tool to edit the anchor points

Step 4

Select the handlebars with the Direct Selection Tool (A) and move them to the middle point to create a teardrop shape.

Edit the handle bars to create a tear drop shape

Step 5

Use the Ellipse Tool (L) to create a circle and place it on top of the teardrop shape. Then use the Pen Tool (P) to create a cross, and place it inside the teardrop shape to create the final bishop icon.

Add a cross and circle to complete the final Bishop Icon

8. How to Create a Queen Icon

Step 1

To start creating the queen icon, create a duplicate of the bishop icon. With the duplicate icon use the Selection Tool (V) or the Direct Selection Tool (A) to remove the top and middle shapes of the icon.

This will leave just the two circles at the bottom and the semicircles on the sides.

Duplicate the Bishop icon and delete the middle shapes

Step 2

Rotate the semicircles slightly. To do this, Right-Click on the shapes, and then go to Transform > Rotate, following the image below.

Rotate the semi circles

Step 3

Use the Ellipse Tool (L) to create two circles, with the outer circle using a stroke and the inner circle using a fill. Remember to hold the Shift key on the keyboard to create a perfect circle.

Create two circles using the Ellipse Tool

Step 4

Use the Ellipse Tool (L) to create two overlapping circles side by side on top of the other shapes.

Create two overlapping circles using the Ellipse Tool

Step 5

Use the Ellipse Tool (L) to create a small circle on top.

Create a small circle using the Ellipse Tool

Step 6

To create the base of the crown, use the Pen Tool (P) or the Rectangle Tool (M) to draw the shape as seen in the image below. When using the Pen Tool, you can hold the Shift key on the keyboard in order the draw a straight line vertically or horizontally. This will make it easier to align.

From there, use the Direct Selection Tool (A) to select the curve points (hold Shift to select multiple points) and move the points towards the centre with the mouse to transform the corners into curves.

Use the Pen Tool and edit the curve points to create the crown

Step 7

Complete the queen icon by placing the crown on top of the shapes, as shown in the image below.

Combine all the shapes to create the final Queen Icon

9. How to Create a King Icon

Step 1

To create the king icon, duplicate the queen icon. With the duplicate icon, use the Direct Selection Tool (A) to delete the middle circle shapes.

Duplicate the Queen Icon and delete the middle shapes

Step 2

Use the Direct Selection Tool (A) to delete the small circle shape at the top of the crown.

Delete the top circle

Step 3

Use the Rectangular Shape Tool (M) to create two squares (one larger outline and one smaller fill shape). Place the smaller square inside and in the middle of the larger square.

From there, select both squares and rotate them both by 45 degrees (Right Click > Transform > Rotate) and place both squares in the centre space of the icon.

Add two squares in the middle and rotate by 45 degrees

Step 4

Use the Pen Tool (P) to create a small cross on top of the crown.

Add a cross shape using the Pen Tool

Awesome! You’re Finished!

Congratulations! You have successfully completed this tutorial. Feel free to share your own creations below! I hope you found this tutorial helpful and that you’ve learned many new tips and tricks that you can use for your future illustrations. See you next time!

The final Chess Icons Set in Adobe Illustrator

Learn More Icon Skills!

If you liked this and are looking to learn some new icon skills, check out these tutorials below! Expand your expertise by going through these in-depth guides. Happy designing!

Check out my video course on Animating Icons in Adobe Illustrator and After Effects:

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Or why not check out these tutorials:

How to Create a Retro Game Boy in 3D: Part 2

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a retro Nintendo Game Boy that you can use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning how to model in Cinema 4D

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, importing reference images and basic rendering techniques.

In this, the first part of the two-part tutorial, I’ll show you how to:

  • How to create Materials
  • How to Colour the Model
  • How to Render the Game Boy 

10. How to Create a New Material

Step 1

Located near the bottom of the screen there should be a material selection window. Click on Create > New Material to create a new material to use that you can edit. I’ll use the materials to colour in the various objects and parts of our Nintendo Game Boy.

Create a new material

Step 2

Double click on the new material to bring up the Material Editor. This is where you can adjust the various properties of your material such as the colour, transparency and reflectance etc. 

For this particular style we will only be interested in flat colour.

The material editor

Step 3

Untick the boxes for Colour and Reflectance and tick the button for Luminance. This gives us the flat colour look for our final image.

Edit the material editor properties

Step 4

To add a material to the object, drag and drop the material to the object using the mouse. 

You can also drag and drop the material onto the object listed on the right of the screen.

The same material can be used for multiple parts of the model. For example, you can use this one material for the front, back and middle parts of our Nintendo Game Boy model.

Drag and drop the material onto an object

11. How to Adjust the Material Properties

Step 1

In the Material Editor, click on the arrow button next to Texture and select Sketch and Toon > Cel from the menu.

Select sketch and toon

Step 2

Click on the new Cel button that appears next to Texture to bring up a new menu.

Select Cel

Step 3

In this new menu, adjust the settings as follows:

  1. Change the Diffuse to match the image at below. It should be greyscale with the colour getting light from left to right.
  2. Untick Camera.
  3. Tick Lights.
  4. Tick Shadows 
  5. Select Multiply from the drop down menu.
Editing the sketch and toon properties

Step 4

Select a colour by double clicking on the colour option box. 

The Material Editor gives you many different options for choosing and picking your colour. These include RGB, HSV etc. Choose whichever option you are most familiar with as a flat colour. Because of the Multiply shading mode, the different colour shades will also appear in the material.

If the material has already been applied to the model, the colour of the model will automatically be adjusted to the new material colour.

Choosing a colour

12. How to Adjust the Shading

Step 1

To get a better idea of the shading and how our render will eventually turn out, click on the small black arrow on the bottom right of the Render Button and select Interactive Render Region from the menu. 

Select interactive render region

Step 2

Adjust the window so that it fits around the Game Boy model. Look for the very small arrow on the right hand side of the window and use the mouse to drag it to the top (this increases the resolution). Decrease the resolution by moving the arrow down if you need to.

Increase the resolution

Step 3

To change the way the light source is facing go to Options > Default Light.

Add a light object to the scene if you are more comfortable working that way.  

Select default light

Step 4

In the Default Light window, click where you would like the light source to come from on the sphere and it will sync with the view port. Experiment with different lighting positions to come up with a lighting situation that you like. 

This can be adjusted at anytime.

Editing the default light

13. Other Lighting Solutions

Step 1

To set up the basic lighting, you’ll want to go to the Floor button located in the top menu bar. Left Click-Hold and then select Physical Sky from the menu.

Select physical sky

Step 2

Ensuring that Physical Sky is selected in the menu on the right, a new menu will appear on the bottom right of the screen. Select the Time and Location tab and choose a time using the left and right arrow keys. This will change the lighting of the scene. Choose a suitable time to light up the scene.

Editing the physical sky

Step 3

To add lighting to the scene, select the Add Light button in the top menu bar at the top of the screen.

This will create a Light Object which you can move around the scene. Move the light object using the Move Tool to a suitable position.

Select add light

Step 4

To customise the lighting further, experiment with the light object options in the bottom right of the screen. Here you can adjust the Intensity, Light Type and even Colour.

Editing the light properties

14. How to Colour the Screen

Step 1

Duplicate the material by holding CTRL on the keyboard and then using the mouse to click and drag the material to the side.

Duplicating the material

Step 2

Double click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there we can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 79
  • G: 222
  • B: 183

We can also click on Cel to change the shading properties of this material if needed.

Choosing a green colour

Step 3

Duplicate the first material again (hold CTRL and click and drag with the mouse).

Duplicating the material

Step 4

Double click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there you can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 111
  • G: 126
  • B: 135
Choosing the grey colour

Step 5

To create a flat colour, select Cel and change the properties of Diffuse to one colour.

Editing the shading options

Step 6

To apply the new materials to the object, use the mouse to drag and drop the materials to the object that you wish to colour. Drag and drop the material to the object list on the right side of the screen.

Drag and drop the screen material onto the Game Boy screen.

Applying the green material to the screen

Step 7

Drag and drop the dark grey material onto the screen border of the Game Boy.

Applying the grey material to the screen border

15. How to Colour the Buttons

Step 1

Duplicate a new material from the first material again (hold CTRL and click and drag with the mouse). Double click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. Change the colour to the following:

  • R: 232
  • G: 96
  • B: 32
Creating the red colour material

Step 2

Duplicate a new material. Double click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there we can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 165
  • G: 199
  • B: 219
Creating the light grey colour material

Step 3

Drag and drop the light grey material onto the button borders of the Game Boy.

Applying the light grey colour material

Step 4

Drag and drop the bright red material onto the main buttons of the Game Boy.

Applying the red colour material to the buttons

16. How to Colour the D-Pad & Small Buttons

Step 1

Duplicate a new material as you did before. Double click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there change the colour to the following:

  • R: 89
  • G: 98
  • B: 106
Creating the dark grey colour material

Step 2

Drag and drop the new material onto the D-Pad, Start and Select buttons of the Game Boy.

Applying the dark grey colour material to the buttons

17. How to Render the Game Boy

Step 1

Click on the Render Settings button located in the top menu bar.

Selecting the render settings button

Step 2

In the Save settings you can select the file location that you want to save your image in. Make sure you also choose the format (PNG) and tick Alpha Channel.

You may wish to tick Alpha Channel on, if you want to continue editing the image in another program such as Adobe Photoshop.

Choosing the save settings

Step 3

Under the Output Settings choose the resolution, height and width of the image. This tutorial uses the settings 1920×1200 72dpi.

Choosing the output settings

Step 4

In the Anti-Aliasing settings, select Cubic (Still Image) which can be found under Filter. This will ensure that your render is nice and sharp.

Choosing the Anti-Aliasing settings

Step 5

Click on the Render button to render your final image. Remember to make sure that you have selected the right view in your viewport (front, right, left or perspective etc.) and that you are happy with the camera angle. 

Choose a suitable angle in the viewport by navigating around the scene.

Click on the render button

Step 6

You can also create a camera if you would like greater control over the camera and render options.

Click on the camera button

The End Result

Wait for the final render to finish. Once the render is complete you can repeat the steps above and change the camera or the view port to create a new image from a different angle. 

Throughout the course of the project you have successfully learnt how to:

  • Import Reference Images
  • Prepare for Modelling
  • Model the retro Game Boy
  • Create Materials
  • Colour the Model
  • Render the Game Boy 

Feel free to share your own creations below. You can also export your image into Adobe Photoshop to enhance it further or to use it as part of a larger image.

Final Nintendo Game Boy Image

How to Create a Retro Game Boy in 3D: Part 1

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a retro Nintendo Game Boy that you can use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning how to model in Cinema 4D

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, importing reference images and basic rendering techniques.

In this, the first part of the two-part tutorial, I’ll show you:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the retro Game Boy

1. How to Import Reference Images

Step 1

Use the middle mouse button to click anywhere on the viewport. This will display all four views. From there, use the middle mouse button to select the Front view.

Four different camera angles to choose from
Four different camera angles to choose from

Step 2

In the Attributes tab select Mode > View Settings.

Select View Settings
Select View Settings

Step 3

In Viewport [Right] select the Back button and click on the button next to Image. 

Select the Back button
Select the Back button

Step 4

Select your reference image from the finder and open it. In this tutorial I’ll use the front view of a retro Nintendo Game Boy to help me.

Reference image of a Nintendo Game Boy
Reference image of a Nintendo Game Boy

Step 5

Adjust the image size and transparency to your liking in the properties window.

Adjust size in the properties window
Adjust size in the properties window

2. How to Adjust the Cube Shape

Step 1

In the top menu bar select the Cube to spawn a cube into the scene.

Spawn a cube into the scene
Spawn a cube into the scene

Step 2

In the properties window, adjust the size so that the shape of the cube fits the shape of the Game Boy background image.

Adjust the size of the cube
Adjust the size of the cube

Step 3

The shape of the cube should roughly fit the shape of the Game Boy background image at this stage. 

Ensure that you check the shape using the other camera views as well (perspective, side and top etc).

The cube should fit the size of the reference image
The cube should fit the size of the reference image

Step 4

Ensure that you check the shape using the other camera views as well (perspective, side and top etc). The size of the shape in the Z axis should be roughly half of what the Game Boy should be.

View in perspective
View in perspective

Step 5

Select the Make Editable button to make the shape editable. Next select the Edge Selection button.

Select Make Editable and Edge Selection buttons
Select Make Editable and Edge Selection buttons

Step 6

Select the bottom right corner of the shape. This is highlighted in orange.

Select the right corner of the shape with Edge Selection
Select the right corner of the shape with Edge Selection

Step 7

Once selected choose the Bevel Tool by using the mouse to Right Click > Bevel. Adjust the bevel by changing the settings in the properties window.

Use the Bevel Tool to curve the corner
Use the Bevel Tool to curve the corner

Step 8

Select the remaining three corners of the shape. This is highlighted in orange. Use the Bevel Tool to curve the corners slightly. The curvature of the remaining three corners should be less than the bottom right corner.

Adjust the remaining corners using Edge Selection
Adjust the remaining corners using Edge Selection

3. How to Create the Game Boy Shape

Step 1

Select the Move Tool. To duplicate this shape you will need to hold CTRL button on the keyboard and then click and drag the Blue Arrow using the mouse. Leave a small gap in between both shapes.

Duplicate the shape
Duplicate the shape

Step 2

Duplicate the shape again and place the new shape in in between the other two (in the middle). With the middle shape still selected, use the Scale Tool and shrink the middle shape by about 95%.

Duplicate and scale the object
Duplicate and scale the object

Step 3

Click on the small back arrow on the Cube button and select Cylinder from the list of options. This will spawn a Cylinder in the scene.

Select Cylinder
Select Cylinder

Step 4

Adjust the properties of the size and orientation of the cylinder using the properties window. The thickness of the cylinder should be roughly the same as the small gap created between the two larger shapes.

Adjust the Cylinder
Adjust the Cylinder

Step 5

Once you’re happy with the size and shape of the cylinder, place it in between the two shapes in the gap.

Place the Cylinder
Place the Cylinder

4. How to Create the Screen

Step 1

Duplicate one of the larger shapes and then use the Scale Tool to reduce the thickness of the shape so that it becomes quite thin.

Duplicate and scale the object
Duplicate and scale the object

Step 2

Use the Move Tool and combine it with the Points Selection Tool to move the rounded corners of the shape so that it fits the size of the screen border (as shown in the background reference image).

Combine the points button with the move and selection tools
Combine the points button with the move and selection tools

Step 3

Select the points you want to move and then move them into place using the Move Tool.

Adjust the points of the object
Adjust the points of the object

Step 3

Create a new cube and change the shape of it so that it fits the main screen of the Game Boy.

Create a new cube object and fit it to the screen
Create a new cube object and fit it to the screen

Step 4

Once you’re happy with the size of the shapes, use the Move Tool to place them on to the body of the Game Boy.

Place the new objects to the Game Boy
Place the new objects to the Game Boy

5. How to Create the Buttons

Step 1

Click on the small back arrow on the Cube button and select Cylinder from the list of options. This will spawn a cylinder in the scene.

Select the Cylinder button
Select the Cylinder button

Step 2

Adjust the properties of the cylinder so that it is facing the correct way, has the correct size and has the desired thickness for the button. Then use the Move Tool to move the button into the correct place using the background image as your reference.

Scale the cylinder and place it correctly
Scale the cylinder and place it correctly

Step 3

Duplicate the button and use the Scale Tool to increase the size slightly. You will want to increase the size uniformly so that the centre point of each object is the same (seen from the front view). 

Duplicate and scale new cylinder
Duplicate and scale new cylinder

Step 4

Make sure that the duplicate cylinder is selected and click on the Make Editable Button. 

Select the Make Editable button
Select the Make Editable button

Step 5

Now that the object is editable, we can edit the points. Make sure that the cylinder object is selected and click on Points Button. 

Click on the Rectangle Selection Tool so that we can select the points you wish to edit. Once you’ve selected the points you can move them using the Move Tool.

Combine the points button with the move and selection tools
Combine the points button with the move and selection tools

Step 6

Use the Rectangle Selection Tool to select half of the cylinder. Then use the Move Tool to move the points to the right.

Adjust the points of the shape
Adjust the points of the shape

Step 7

Duplicate the button and use the Move Tool to move the button to the right.

Duplicate and place buttons
Duplicate and place buttons

Step 8

When moving a whole object, select and use the Model button. If this is not selected, you may find that you will be moving the points, edges or faces instead.

Select the Model button
Select the Model button

Step 9

Making sure that you have the Model button turned on, select all three cylinder shapes which now make up your Game Boy buttons. 

Once all three have been selected, press Alt-G on the keyboard to group them up. You can then rename the Null by double clicking on it.

Group the cylinders
Group the cylinders

Step 10

Select the whole group and use the Rotate Tool to rotate the buttons so that it matches the reference image in the front view.

Rotate the buttons
Rotate the buttons

Step 11

Ensure that you use the other camera views to ensure that the button placement is correct and moved to the right area.

Place the buttons on to the Game Boy
Place the buttons on to the Game Boy

6. How to Create the D-Pad

Step 1

To create the D-Pad, use a similar technique to creating the Game Boy buttons. 

First, create the background cylinder. To do this click on the small back arrow on the Cube button and select Cylinder from the list of options. This will spawn a cylinder in the scene.

Select the Cylinder button
Select the Cylinder button

Step 2

Resize the cylinder using the shape parameters window so that it fits roughly around the size of the D-Pad. Then use the Move Tool to move the cylinder shape in place. 

Place cylinder correctly onto Game Boy
Place cylinder correctly onto Game Boy

Step 3

With the cylinder shape selected you can use the parameters window to adjust the radius, height and rotation segments of the cylinder. 

The more segments you create, the smoother the circle will become. We also want to make sure that the height is not too large, as this shape will only be used on the surface of the Game Boy.

Ajdust the cylinder
Ajdust the cylinder

Step 4

Create a cube and use the parameters window again to adjust the shape so that it is roughly the same shape as half of the D-Pad.

Create a new Cube and adjust it
Create a new Cube and adjust it

Step 5

With the new cube shape selected you can use the parameters window to adjust the size or the D-Pad. This object will need to be duplicated in order to create the second half of the D-Pad.

Adjust the new object
Adjust the new object

Step 6

To duplicate this shape, select the cube from the object list. Press the CTRL button on the keyboard and click and drag the cube object. 

Place the duplicate cube object on the list. This way of duplicating an object means that both objects are exactly the same in exactly the same position.

Duplcate the new cube
Duplcate the new cube

Step 7

Rotate the new D-Pad object using the Rotate Tool and rotate it by exactly 90 degrees. 

Rotate the object 90 degrees
Rotate the object 90 degrees

Step 8

Make sure that you use the other camera views to ensure that the D-Pad placement is correct and moved to the right area.

Place the D-Pad onto the surface of the Game Boy
Place the D-Pad onto the surface of the Game Boy

7. How to Create the Start & Select Buttons

Step 1

Because the start and select buttons have a very similar shape to the shape that was created for the background for the buttons, duplicate the same shape. 

Do this by pressing and holding the CTRL button on the keyboard and clicking and dragging the object using the Move Tool. 

Duplicate shape
Duplicate shape

Step 2

With the new object selected, use the Scale Tool to make the shape around the same size as the start and select buttons in the reference image. 

Ensure that you click on the background instead of the coloured icons when using the tool if you want to scale uniformly.

Scale shape
Scale shape

Step 3

Use the Move Tool and combine it with the Points Selection Tool to move the rounded corners of the shape so that it fits the length of the start and select button (as shown in the background reference image).

Combine the points button with the move and selection tools
Combine the points button with the move and selection tools

Step 4

Ensure the you have the object and Move Tool selected. Hold the CTRL button on the keyboard and click and drag the button to duplicate it.

Duplicate and space the shapes out
Duplicate and space the shapes out

Step 5

Ensure that you use the other camera views to ensure that the start and select button placement is correct and moved to the right area.

Place buttons on to the surface of the Game Boy
Place buttons on to the surface of the Game Boy

8. How to Create the Speakers

Step 1

Because the speakers have a very similar shape to the shape that was created for the start and select buttons, we will be duplicating the same shape. 

Do this by pressing and holding the CTRL button on the keyboard and clicking and dragging the object using the Move Tool. 

Duplicate button
Duplicate button

Step 2

Use the Rotate Tool to rotate the shape so that it fits the angle shown in the reference image.

Rotate button
Rotate button

Step 3

Use the Scale Tool so that the size roughly fits that of the speakers in the reference image.

Scale button
Scale button

Step 4

Use the Move Tool and combine it with the Points Selection Tool to move the rounded corners of the shape so that it fits the length of the speakers (as shown in the background reference image).

Combine the points button with the move and selection tools
Combine the points button with the move and selection tools

Step 5

Ensure that the length of the shape roughly fits that of the speakers in the reference image. 

Lengthen the button
Lengthen the button

Step 6

Ensure the you have the object and Move Tool selected. Hold the CTRL button on the keyboard and click and drag the button to duplicate it.

Duplicate the shape
Duplicate the shape

Step 7

Duplicate the object several times until looks roughly the same as the shape of the Game Boy speakers.

Duplicate the shape many times until you are satisfied
Duplicate the shape many times until you are satisfied

Step 8

Ensure that you use the other camera views to ensure that the placement is correct and moved to the right area.

Place shapes onto the surface of the Game Boy
Place shapes onto the surface of the Game Boy

9. How to use Boole

Step 1

Select Boole by clicking on the small arrow on the bottom right of the Array button at the top of the screen.

Select Boole from menu
Select Boole from menu

Step 2

Select the objects that you want the Boole to effect. This will be the front part of the Game Boy and the speakers (which have been grouped together using Alt-G). 

Put both objects into the Boole and make sure that the speakers group is placed below the Game Boy body.

Group objects under Boole
Group objects under Boole

Step 3

By using the Boole create cut outs using the shapes created. 

Cut out the speakers
Cut out the speakers

Step 4

Use the different camera angles to double check the Game Boy model to make sure that it looks correct.

Final Game Boy model
Final Game Boy model

Coming Next

In the second part of the the tutorial series, I’ll show you how to:

  • Create Materials
  • Colour in the Game Boy Model
  • Render the Game Boy Model

How to Create a Low Poly Sword in 3DS Max: Part 2

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a low poly sword model that you can use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning 3D Studio Max quickly. 

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D shapes, modelling techniques and preparing topology for texturing.

In the first part of the two-part tutorial, I showed you how to:

  • Model the Handle of the Sword
  • Model the Hand Guard of the Sword
  • Model the Blade of the Sword

In this, the second part of the the tutorial series, I’ll show you how to:

  • Unwrap the UVs
  • Create a UV Map
  • Create a Texture Map in Photoshop

05. UVW Remove

Step 1

In this section of the tutorial I’ll go through how to prepare the model so that I can unwrap it. Both UVW Remove and Reset Xform must be performed before attempting to unwrap any of the sword parts.

Ensure you have selected the sword part that you want to unwrap (blade, handle, hand guard etc.). The object must now be converted into an editable mesh. To do this Right Click on the object and select Convert to Editable Mesh

Convert to Editable Mesh
Convert to Editable Mesh

Step 2

Then go to the Utilities Tab and click on the More button. Scroll down the menu and select UVW Remove.

Select UVW Remove
Select UVW Remove

Step 3

Click on the UVW button that appears under Parameters to apply this to the selected object.

Click on the UVW Button
Click on the UVW Button

Step 4

Once UVW Remove has been applied, Right Click on the object and select Convert to Editable Poly.

Convert to Editable Poly
Convert to Editable Poly

06. Reset XForm

Step 1

Ensure that you’ve selected the sword part that you want to unwrap (blade, handle, hand guard etc.). Go to the Utilities Tab and click on the Reset XForm button and then click on the Reset Selected button.

Click on Reset Xform
Click on Reset Xform

Step 2

Click on the Modify Tab and right click on XForm > Collapse All to apply this to your object.

Secondary click on XForm and then Collapse All
Secondary click on XForm and then Collapse All

07. Unwrapping the Blade

Step 1

To begin unwrapping the blade, ensure you’ve selected it and ensure you’ve followed both sections five and six of this tutorial—UVW Remove and Reset XForm.

To make the next step easier ensure that you’re viewing the blade from the side view.

Turn the Blade model
Turn the Blade model

Step 2

Delete one half of the blade using the Vertex Selection tool.

Delete half of the blade
Delete half of the blade

Step 3

Make sure that the blade is an editable poly by right clicking on it and then selecting Convert to Editable Poly.

Convert to Editable Poly
Convert to Editable Poly

Step 4

Go to the Modifier List drop down menu and select Unwrap UVW.

Select Unwrap UVW
Select Unwrap UVW

Step 5

In the Modify Tab under the Edit UVs section select Open UV Editor.

Select Open UV Editor
Select Open UV Editor

Step 6

The Edit UVSs window appears. Use the Move Tool and the Scale Tool located in the top right of the window to move the object within the square. Once the object is within the square, click on the Reset Peel button.

Select Reset Peel
Select Reset Peel

Step 7

After clicking on the Reset Peel button, use the Move Tool to move the blade inside the border of the square.

Move the blade in the UV Editor
Move the blade in the UV Editor

Step 8

Use the tools on the top left of the Edit UVWs window (Move, Rotate, Scale) and place it on the right side of the square within the border.

Edit the UVs in the UV Editor
Edit the UVs in the UV Editor

Step 9

Close the Edit UVWs window. Ensure the blade is selected and go to the Modify tab. Right Click on the Unwrap Modifier and select Collapse All

If it becomes an Editable Mesh, convert it into an Editable Poly. Secondary Click > Convert to Editable Poly.

Right click and Collapse All
Right click and Collapse All

08. Duplicate the Blade UVs

Step 1

Use the Edge Selection Tool and select one of the outer most edges of the blade.

Select an edge of the sword
Select an edge of the sword

Step 2

In the Modifier List, scroll down and select Symmetry.

Select Symmetry from the list
Select Symmetry from the list

Step 3

Under the Parameters section, select the following:

  • Mirror Axis: Y
  • Flip
Edit the mirror parameters
Edit the mirror parameters

Step 4

Once the parameters have been selected, your blade should be whole again.

Mirror the blade
Mirror the blade

Step 5

Convert the blade back into an Editable Poly by selecting the blade with Secondary Click > Convert to Editable Poly.

Convert to Editable Poly
Convert to Editable Poly

Step 6

To check that the UVWs have been duplicated correctly, apply the Unwrap UVW modifier on the blade again by selecting it from the Modifier List.

Select Unwrap UVW
Select Unwrap UVW

Step 7

Move the UVWs in the Edit UVWs window to ensure that the blade shapes sit on top of each other nicely.

Check the UVs
Check the UVs

09. Unwrapping the Hand Guard

Step 1

Select the hand guard. The aim of this section is to remove half of each shape, so that they can be mirrored and so that they take up less space on the UVW Map.

Delete half of the hand guard
Delete half of the hand guard

Step 2

Select the middle tube shape and using the Vertex Selection tool, select and delete half of the shape.

Delete half of the shape
Delete half of the shape

Step 3

Select the middle shape and using the Vertex Selection tool, select and delete half of the shape.

Delete half of the shape
Delete half of the shape

Step 4

Repeat the same process for the horns. However I’ll only need one half as this will be duplicate four times because we only need one half for the texture map.

Delete 34 of the horns
Delete 34 of the horns

Step 5

Select all the hand guard shapes and select Unwrap UVW from the Modifier List.

Select Unwrap UVW
Select Unwrap UVW

Step 6

Using the same process as what was done for the blade, Reset Peel and arrange the shapes within the square. Ensure all the objects are attached to one another.

Arrange UVs in the UVW Editor
Arrange UVs in the UVW Editor

Step 7

Convert the shapes back into an Editable Poly by selecting the blade and going Right Click > Convert to Editable Poly. Using the same process as what was done with the blade, use the Symmetry modifier to make the hand guard whole again.

Select symmetry from the menu
Select symmetry from the menu

Step 8

Ensure that the symmetry modifier gives you the correct results by choosing the right parameters. You can also apply Unwrap UVW modifier again to check the UVWs are placed on top of each other like the blade.

Delete half of the hand guard
Delete half of the hand guard

10. Unwrapping the Handle

Step 1

Select the middle section of the handle.

Select the middle section
Select the middle section

Step 2

Using the Vertex Selection tool, delete half of the handle.

Delete half of the handle
Delete half of the handle

Step 3

Repeat the same steps as above to remove half of the handle for all the objects.

Delete half of all the handle objects
Delete half of all the handle objects

Step 4

Ensure all the objects are attached to each other and apply the Unwrap UVW modifier.

Select Unwrap UVW from the menu
Select Unwrap UVW from the menu

Step 5

Using the same process as what was done for the blade and the hand guard, Reset Peel and arrange the shapes within the square. 

Arrange the UVs in the UVW Editor
Arrange the UVs in the UVW Editor

Step 6

Convert the shapes back into an Editable Poly by selecting the blade and going Secondary Click > Convert to Editable Poly

Using the same process as what was done with the blade and hand guard, use the Symmetry modifier to make the handle whole again.

Select Symmetry from the menu
Select Symmetry from the menu

Step 7

Ensure the symmetry modifier gives you the correct results by choosing the right parameters. You can also apply Unwrap UVW modifier again to check the UVWs are placed on top of each other like the blade.

Apply the symmetry modifier to the handle
Apply the symmetry modifier to the handle

11. Render UVW Map

Step 1

Attach all the objects together with Secondary Click > Attach, then apply the Unwrap UVW modifier.

Select Unwrap UVW fromt he menu
Select Unwrap UVW fromt he menu

Step 2

Open the UV Editor and ensure all the shapes are arranged within the square and are not overlapping each other. You can still edit them at this stage using the Move, Scale or Rotate tool.

Arrange the UVs in the UVW Editor
Arrange the UVs in the UVW Editor

Step 3

Once you are happy with the arrangement of the UVs go to Tools > Render UVW Template.

Select Render UVW Template
Select Render UVW Template

Step 4

Select the dimensions you would like to render the UV Map to and then click the Render UV Template button.

Edit dimensions to render the UV Map
Edit dimensions to render the UV Map

Step 5

Once the map has been generated, save it to a location using the save button on the top left hand corner of the window. 

Save the UV Map
Save the UV Map

12. Create Texture Map

Step 1

Import the UV map into Photoshop and create a new background layer below the UVs.

Import UV Map to Photoshop
Import UV Map to Photoshop

Step 2

You can make the UVs easier to see by changing the colour of the lines. To do this, right click on the UV layer and select Blending Options.

Select Blending Options
Select Blending Options

Step 3

Select Colour Overlay and choose a white colour.

Select Colour Overlay and choose white
Select Colour Overlay and choose white

Step 4

Create a new layer underneath the UVs and create a colour map so that you can select the shapes efficiently.

Create a colour map
Create a colour map

Step 5

Using the UVs and the colour map, create a new layer and create some base colours for the blade.

Create the base colours for the blade
Create the base colours for the blade

Step 6

On a separate layer, create some base colours for the handle.

Create the base colours for the handle
Create the base colours for the handle

Step 7

You can create a new layer on top of your base colours to create some details to the sword. You can add some highlights, cracks and battle damage to make it look more interesting.

Create some details for the texture map
Create some details for the texture map

Step 8

Once you are happy with the results, save your Texture Map as an image file.

Save the texture map
Save the texture map

13. Apply the Texture Map

Step 1

Ensure you have the sword selected and then click on the Material Editor button on the top menu bar.

Select the Material Editor
Select the Material Editor

Step 2

Once the Material Editor window appears go to Mode > Compact Material Editor.

Select the Compact Material Editor
Select the Compact Material Editor

Step 3

Select one of the spheres that you want the texture map to appear on and then click on the empty box next to Diffuse.

Select the Diffuse
Select the Diffuse

Step 4

Scroll up to the top of the Material/Map Browser and select Bitmap.

Choose bitmap from the menu
Choose bitmap from the menu

Step 5

Select the Texture Map image that was created in Adobe Photoshop.

Select the texture map
Select the texture map 

Step 6

Ensure the sword model is selected and then click on Assign Material to Selection and then click on Show Shaded Material in Viewport

Apply the texture map
Apply the texture map 

Step 7

This should apply the texture map to the 3D Sword Model.

The texture map has been applied to the sword model
The texture map has been applied to the sword model

Conclusion

And with that, the 3D Low Poly Sword is complete. Feel free to share the own creations below. Explore different objects, shapes and colours to find out what works best for your model.

You can also render the model and export it to Adobe Photoshop to create an image for your portfolio.

Final sword model including the texture map
Final sword model including the texture map