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How to set up Fedora Silverblue as a gaming station

This article gives you a step by step guide to turn your Fedora Silverblue into an awesome gaming station with the help of Flatpak and Steam.

Note: Do you need the NVIDIA proprietary driver on Fedora 29 Silverblue for a complete experience? Check out this blog post for pointers.

Add the Flathub repository

This process starts with a clean Fedora 29 Silverblue installation with a user already created for you.

First, go to https://flathub.org/home and enable the Flathub repository on your system. To do this, click the Quick setup button on the main page.

Quick setup button on flathub.org/home

This redirects you to https://flatpak.org/setup/ where you should click on the Fedora icon.

Fedora icon on flatpak.org/setup

Now you just need to click on Flathub repository file. Open the downloaded file with the Software Install application.

Flathub repository file button on flatpak.org/setup/Fedora

The GNOME Software application opens. Next, click on the Install button. This action needs sudo permissions, because it installs the Flathub repository for use by the whole system.

Install button in GNOME Software

Install the Steam flatpak

You can now search for the Steam flatpak in GNOME Software. If you can’t find it, try rebooting — or logout and login — in case GNOME Software didn’t read the metadata. That happens automatically when you next login.

Searching for Steam

Click on the Steam row and the Steam page opens in GNOME Software. Next, click on Install.

Steam page in GNOME Software

And now you have installed Steam flatpak on your system.

Enable Steam Play in Steam

Now that you have Steam installed, launch it and log in. To play Windows games too, you need to enable Steam Play in Steam. To enable it, choose Steam > Settings from the menu in the main window.

Settings button in Steam

Navigate to the Steam Play section. You should see the option Enable Steam Play for supported titles is already ticked, but it’s recommended you also tick the Enable Steam Play option for all other titles. There are plenty of games that are actually playable, but not whitelisted yet on Steam. To see which games are playable, visit ProtonDB and search for your favorite game. Or just look for the games with the most platinum reports.

Steam Play settings menu on Steam

If you want to know more about Steam Play, you can read the article about it here on Fedora Magazine:

Appendix

You’re now ready to play plenty of games on Linux. Please remember to share your experience with others using the Contribute button on ProtonDB and report bugs you find on GitHub, because sharing is nice. 🙂


Photo by Hardik Sharma on Unsplash.

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Let’s try dwm — dynamic window manger

If you like efficiency and minimalism, and are looking for a new window manager for your Linux desktop, you should try dwm — dynamic window manager. Written in under 2000 standard lines of code, dwm is extremely fast yet powerful and highly customizable window manager.

You can dynamically choose between tiling, monocle and floating layouts, organize your windows into multiple workspaces using tags, and quickly navigate through using keyboard shortcuts. This article helps you get started using dwm.

Installation

To install dwm on Fedora, run:

$ sudo dnf install dwm dwm-user

The dwm package installs the window manager itself, and the dwm-user package significantly simplifies configuration which will be explained later in this article.

Additionally, to be able to lock the screen when needed, we’ll also install slock — a simple X display locker.

$ sudo dnf install slock

However, you can use a different one based on your personal preference.

Quick start

To start dwm, choose the dwm-user option on the login screen.

After you log in, you’ll see a very simple desktop. In fact, the only thing there will be a bar at the top listing our nine tags that represent workspaces and a []= symbol that represents the layout of your windows.

Launching applications

Before looking into the layouts, first launch some applications so you can play with the layouts as you go. Apps can be started by pressing Alt+p and typing the name of the app followed by Enter. There’s also a shortcut Alt+Shift+Enter for opening a terminal.

Now that some apps are running, have a look at the layouts.

Layouts

There are three layouts available by default: the tiling layout, the monocle layout, and the floating layout.

The tiling layout, represented by []= on the bar, organizes windows into two main areas: master on the left, and stack on the right. You can activate the tiling layout by pressing Alt+t.

The idea behind the tiling layout is that you have your primary window in the master area while still seeing the other ones in the stack. You can quickly switch between them as needed.

To swap windows between the two areas, hover your mouse over one in the stack area and press Alt+Enter to swap it with the one in the master area.

The monocle layout, represented by [N] on the top bar, makes your primary window take the whole screen. You can switch to it by pressing Alt+m.

Finally, the floating layout lets you move and resize your windows freely. The shortcut for it is Alt+f and the symbol on the top bar is ><>.

Workspaces and tags

Each window is assigned to a tag (1-9) listed at the top bar. To view a specific tag, either click on its number using your mouse or press Alt+1..9. You can even view multiple tags at once by clicking on their number using the secondary mouse button.

Windows can be moved between different tags by highlighting them using your mouse, and pressing Alt+Shift+1..9. 

Configuration

To make dwm as minimalistic as possible, it doesn’t use typical configuration files. Instead, you modify a C header file representing the configuration, and recompile it. But don’t worry, in Fedora it’s as simple as just editing one file in your home directory and everything else happens in the background thanks to the dwm-user package provided by the maintainer in Fedora.

First, you need to copy the file into your home directory using a command similar to the following:

$ mkdir ~/.dwm
$ cp /usr/src/dwm-VERSION-RELEASE/config.def.h ~/.dwm/config.h

You can get the exact path by running man dwm-start.

Second, just edit the ~/.dwm/config.h file. As an example, let’s configure a new shortcut to lock the screen by pressing Alt+Shift+L.

Considering we’ve installed the slock package mentioned earlier in this post, we need to add the following two lines into the file to make it work:

Under the /* commands */ comment, add:

static const char *slockcmd[] = { "slock", NULL };

And the following line into static Key keys[]:

{ MODKEY|ShiftMask, XK_l, spawn, {.v = slockcmd } },

In the end, it should look like as follows: (added lines are highlighted)

...
/* commands */
static char dmenumon[2] = "0"; /* component of dmenucmd, manipulated in spawn() */
static const char *dmenucmd[] = { "dmenu_run", "-m", dmenumon, "-fn", dmenufont, "-nb", normbgcolor, "-nf", normfgcolor, "-sb", selbgcolor, "-sf", selfgcolor, NULL };
static const char *termcmd[]  = { "st", NULL };
static const char *slockcmd[] = { "slock", NULL };

static Key keys[] = {
/* modifier                     key        function        argument */
{ MODKEY|ShiftMask,             XK_l,      spawn,          {.v = slockcmd } },
{ MODKEY,                       XK_p,      spawn,          {.v = dmenucmd } },
{ MODKEY|ShiftMask,             XK_Return, spawn,          {.v = termcmd } },
...

Save the file.

Finally, just log out by pressing Alt+Shift+q and log in again. The scripts provided by the dwm-user package will recognize that you have changed the config.h file in your home directory and recompile dwm on login. And becuse dwm is so tiny, it’s fast enough you won’t even notice it.

You can try locking your screen now by pressing Alt+Shift+L, and then logging back in again by typing your password and pressing enter.

Conclusion

If you like minimalism and want a very fast yet powerful window manager, dwm might be just what you’ve been looking for. However, it probably isn’t for beginners. There might be a lot of additional configuration you’ll need to do in order to make it just as you like it.

To learn more about dwm, see the project’s homepage at https://dwm.suckless.org/.

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GNOME 3.32 released & coming to Fedora 30

Today, the GNOME project announced the release of GNOME 3.32.

The release of the GNOME desktop is the default desktop environment in the upcoming release of Fedora 30 Workstation. GNOME 3.32 includes a wide range of enhancements, including: new default application icons, a new emoji chooser in the on screen keyboard, and improved per-app permissions control.

GNOME 3.32

New Icons

GNOME 3.32 features a range of UI tweaks and improvements. Notably, the entire default icon library has been updated and refreshed, featuring more vibrant colours.

Some of the new icons in GNOME 3.32

Additionally, the colours of the desktop are tweaked to the brighter colour palette to match the new icons.

App Menus deprecated

In GNOME 3. the App Menu is the dropdown that appeared in the top left of the panel next to the Activities hotspot. As of GNOME 3.32, this UI feature is deprecated, and all core GNOME default applications now no longer have App Menus.

Fractional Scaling

Previously, the GNOME UI could only scale in increments of 1. With the wide range of different DPI screens available this may cause a strange middle ground on some displays, where the UI is either too small or too large when scaled. GNOME 3.32 provides experimental support for scaling the UI by more granular amounts.

Better emoji input

GNOME 3.32 features an updated on-screen keyboard implementation. Most notably, this includes the ability to easily “type” emoji with the on-screen keyboard

Emoji on-screen keyboard in GNOME 3.32

Improved App permissions control

The new “Application Permissions” in the main settings dialog allows users to view and change permissions for applications.

Read more about this release

There are many more changes and enhancements in this major version of GNOME. Check out the release announcement and the release notes from the GNOME Project for more information.


Screenshots in this post are from the GNOME 3.32 release notes

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Discuss everything Fedora

Are you new to using Fedora, or have a question about using Fedora? Got a story or helpful hint for Fedora that you want to share? You want to check out Fedora Discussion. It is a relatively new place where users and members of the Fedora Community meet to discuss, ask questions, and interact.

Fedora Discussion is a forum and discussion site that uses the Discourse open source discussion platform.

There are already several categories useful for Fedora users, including Desktop (covering Fedora Workstation, Fedora Silverblue, KDE, XFCE, and more) and the Server, Cloud, and IoT category . Additionally, some of the Fedora Special Interest Groups (SIGs) have discussions as well. Finally, the Fedora Friends category helps you connect with other Fedora users and Community members by providing discussions about upcoming meetups and hackfests.

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Get cooking with GNOME Recipes on Fedora

Do you love to cook? Looking for a better way to manage your recipes using Fedora? GNOME Recipes is an awesome application available to install in Fedora to store and organize your recipe collection.

GNOME Recipes is an recipe management tool from the GNOME project. It has the visual style of a modern GNOME style application, and feels similar to GNOME Software, but for food.

Installing GNOME Recipes

Recipes is available to install from the 3rd party Flathub repositories. If you have never installed an application from Flathub before, set it up using the following guide:

Install Flathub apps on Fedora

After correctly setting up Flathub as a software source, you will be able to search for and install Recipes via GNOME Software.

Recipe management

Recipes allows you to manually add your own collection of recipes, including photos, ingredients, directions, as well as extra metadata like preparation time, cuisine style, and spiciness.

When entering in a new item, GNOME Recipes there are a range of different measurement units to choose from, as well as special tags for items like temperature, allowing you to easily switch units.

Community recipes

In addition to manually entering in your favourite dishes for your own use, it also allows you to find, use, and contribute recipes to the community. Additionally, you can mark your favourites, and search the collection by the myriad of metadata available for each recipe.

Step by step guidance

One of the awesome little features in GNOME Recipes is the step by step fullscreen mode. When you are ready to cook, simply activate this mode, move you laptop to the kitchen, and you will have a full screen display of the current step in the cooking method. Futhermore, you can set up the recipes to have timers displayed on this mode when something is in the oven.

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JDK Mission Control is now in Fedora 29

JDK Mission Control (JMC) is now available as a module in Fedora 29. JDK Mission Control is a powerful profiling application for HotSpot JVMs. It has an advanced set of tools that enables efficient and detailed analysis of the extensive data collected by JDK Flight Recorder (JFR). JMC requires JDK 8 or later.

JFR is part of the JVM, and is available in OpenJDK 11 or Oracle JDK 7u4 or later. Therefore, to generate a flight recording to be loaded into JMC for analysis, the target application needs to run on OpenJDK 11 or OracleJDK 7u4 or later.

This article is a guide to install and run JMC on Fedora 29 Workstation. Then you’ll learn how to use it to solve a common problem with Java programs called hot methods.

Installing JMC on Fedora 29

Using Java 11 will allow JMC to record JFR data for itself. Install Java 11 via:

$ sudo dnf install java-11-openjdk

Enable and install the JMC module with the default profile via:

$ sudo dnf module install jmc:latest/default

Run JMC targeting the Java 11 JRE via:

$ jmc -vm /usr/lib/jvm/jre-11/bin

Using JMC and JFR to explore hot methods

JDK Mission Control can be used to deeply analyze Java applications. In this example, we will take a look at hot methods. Hot methods are methods where a high proportion of time is spent during execution. These are good places to start investigating when trying to reduce overall execution time.

To demonstrate, here is a portion of code for a Java application.

Initiator Sample Code

In practice, there are multiple methods of analyzing Java applications in JDK Mission Control. As an example, you can run the application with Flight Recording enabled and set to dump on JVM exit. This generates a Flight Recording (.jfr) file when the application exits, which can be opened by JDK Mission Control. Note that Flight Recorder is available in OpenJDK 11+ and OracleJDK 7u4+.

For example, for OpenJDK 11+ use this command to run the class with Flight Recorder:

$ java -XX:+FlightRecorder -XX:StartFlightRecording=dumponexit=true,filename=initiator.jfr Initiator

After the application has completed execution, open the resulting Flight Recording with JMC. Below is the automated analysis results.

Automated Analysis Results

The automated Method Profiling analysis already indicates a potential optimization area in the calls to Integer.equals(Object). Going to the Method Profiling tab, select that method and check the Stack Trace for it as shown below.

Method Profiling View

In this Stack Trace, you can follow the calls to the method Initiator.countIntersection(Initiator). Checking the Initiator class, shown below, note that counting intersections between two Integer collections would be better done using HashSet collections instead of LinkedLists collections.

The Before and After Code

After making this change, you can see the execution improve in the follow-up Flight Recording.

Method Profiling View of ‘After’ Code

JDK Mission Control and JDK Flight Recorder gives you a highly detailed view of your Java application behavior. You can use it to diagnose issues with hot methods, deadlocks, lock contention, memory leaks and more. Try it out via the JMC module in Fedora 29!

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Set up two-factor authentication for SSH on Fedora

Every day there seems to be a security breach reported in the news where our data is at risk. Despite the fact that SSH is a secure way to connect remotely to a system, you can still make it even more secure. This article will show you how.

That’s where two-factor authentication (2FA) comes in. Even if you disable passwords and only allow SSH connections using public and private keys, an unauthorized user could still gain access to your system if they steal your keys.

With two-factor authentication, you can’t connect to a server with just your SSH keys. You also need to provide the randomly generated number displayed by an authenticator application on a mobile phone.

The Time-based One-time Password algorithm (TOTP) is the method shown in this article. Google Authenticator is used as the server application. Google Authenticator is available by default in Fedora.

For your mobile phone, you can use any two-way authentication application that is compatible with TOTP. There are numerous free applications for Android or IOS that work with TOTP and Google Authenticator. This article uses FreeOTP as an example.

Install and set up Google Authenticator

First, install the Google Authenticator package on your server.

$ sudo dnf install -y google-authenticator

Run the application.

$ google-authenticator

The application presents you with a series of questions. The snippets below show you how to answer for a reasonably secure setup.

Do you want authentication tokens to be time-based (y/n) y
Do you want me to update your "/home/user/.google_authenticator" file (y/n)? y

The app provides you with a secret key, verification code, and recovery codes. Keep these in a secure, safe location. The recovery codes are the only way to access your server if you lose your mobile phone.

Set up mobile phone authentication

Install the authenticator application (FreeOTP) on your mobile phone. You can find it in Google Play if you have an Android phone, or in the iTunes store for an Apple iPhone.

A QR code is displayed on the screen. Open up the FreeOTP app on your mobile phone. To add a new account, select the QR code shaped tool at the top on the app, and then scan the QR code. After the setup is complete, you’ll have to provide the random number generated by the authenticator application every time you connect to your server remotely.

Finish configuration

The application asks further questions. The example below shows you how to answer to set up a reasonably secure configuration.

Do you want to disallow multiple uses of the same authentication token? This restricts you to one login about every 30s, but it increases your chances to notice or even prevent man-in-the-middle attacks (y/n) y
By default, tokens are good for 30 seconds. In order to compensate for possible time-skew between the client and the server, we allow an extra token before and after the current time. If you experience problems with poor time synchronization, you can increase the window from its default size of +-1min (window size of 3) to about +-4min (window size of 17 acceptable tokens).
Do you want to do so? (y/n) n
If the computer that you are logging into isn't hardened against brute-force login attempts, you can enable rate-limiting for the authentication module. By default, this limits attackers to no more than 3 login attempts every 30s.
Do you want to enable rate-limiting (y/n) y

Now you have to set up SSH to take advantage of the new two-way authentication.

Configure SSH

Before completing this step, make sure you’ve already established a working SSH connection using public SSH keys, since we’ll be disabling password connections. If there is a problem or mistake, having a connection will allow you to fix the problem.

On your server, use sudo to edit the /etc/pam.d/sshd file.

$ sudo vi /etc/pam.d/ssh

Comment out the auth substack password-auth line:

#auth       substack     password-auth

Add the following line to the bottom of the file.

auth sufficient pam_google_authenticator.so

Save and close the file. Next, edit the /etc/ssh/sshd_config file.

$ sudo vi /etc/ssh/sshd_config

Look for the ChallengeResponseAuthentication line and change it to yes.

ChallengeResponseAuthentication yes

Look for the PasswordAuthentication line and change it to no.

PasswordAuthentication no

Add the following line to the bottom of the file.

AuthenticationMethods publickey,password publickey,keyboard-interactive

Save and close the file, and then restart SSH.

$ sudo systemctl restart sshd

Testing your two-factor authentication

When you attempt to connect to your server you’re now prompted for a verification code.

[user@client ~]$ ssh user@example.com
Verification code:

The verification code is randomly generated by your authenticator application on your mobile phone. Since this number changes every few seconds, you need to enter it before it changes.

If you do not enter the verification code, you won’t be able to access the system, and you’ll get a permission denied error:

 
[user@client ~]$ ssh user@example.com
Verification code:
Verification code:
Verification code:
Permission denied (keyboard-interactive).
[user@client ~]$

Conclusion

By adding this simple two-way authentication, you’ve now made it much more difficult for an unauthorized user to gain access to your server.

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Building Flatpak apps in Gnome Builder on Fedora Silverblue

If you are developing software using Fedora Silverblue, and especially if what you are developing is a Gnome application, Gnome Builder 3.30.3 feels like an obvious choice of IDE.

In this article, I will show you how you can create a simple Gnome application, and how to build it and install it as a Flatpak app on your system.

Gnome and Flatpak applications

Builder has been a part of Gnome for a long time. It is a very mature IDE to me in terms of consistency and completeness.

The Gnome Builder project website offers extensive documentation regarding Gnome application development — I highly recommend spending some time there to anyone interested.

Editor’s note: Getting Builder

Because the initial Fedora Silverblue installation doesn’t include Builder, let’s walk through the installation process first.

Starting with a freshly installed system, the first thing you’ll need to do is to enable a repository providing Builder as a Flatpak — we’ll use Flathub which is a popular 3rd-party repository with many desktop apps.

To enable Flathub on your system, download the repository file from the Fedora Quick Setup page, and double-click it which opens Gnome Software asking you to enable this repository on your system.

After you’re done with that, you can search for Builder in Gnome Software and install it.

Creating a new project

So let’s walk through the creation of a new project for our Gnome app. When you start Gnome Builder, the first display is oriented towards project management.

To create a new project, I clicked on the New… button at the top-left corner which showed me the following view.

You’ll need to fill out the project name, choose your preferred language (I chose C, but other languages will work for this example as well), and the license. Leave the version control on, and select Gnome Application as your template.

I chose gbfprtfsb as the name of my project which means Hello from Gnome 3 on Fedora SilverBlue.

The IDE creates and opens the project once you press create.

Tweaking our new project

The newly created project is opened in the Builder IDE and on my system looks like the following.

This project could be run from within the IDE right now and would give you the ever popular “Hello World!” titled gnome windowed application with a label that says, yup “Hello World!”.

Let’s get a little disruptive and mess up the title and greeting a bit. Complacency leads to mediocrity which leads to entropy overcoming chaos to enforce order, stasis, then finally it all just comes to a halt. It’s therefore our duty to shake it up at every opportunity, if only to knock out any latent entropy that may have accumulated in our systems. Towards such lofty goals, we only need to change two lines of one file, and the file isn’t even a C language file, it’s an XML file used to describe the GUI named gbfprtfsb-window.ui. All we have to do is open it and edit the title and label text, save and then build our masterpiece!

Looking at the screenshot below, I have circled the text we are going to replace. The window is a GtkApplicationWindow, and uses a GtkHeaderBar and GtkLabel to display the text we are changing. In the GtkHeaderBar we will type GBFPRTFSB for the title property. In the GtkLabel we will type Hello from Gnome 3 on Fedora SilverBlue in the label property. Now save the file to record our changes.

Building the project

Well, we have made our changes, and expressed our individualism (cough) at the same time. All that is left is to build it and see what it looks like. The build panel is located near the top of the IDE, middle right, and is represented by the icon that appears to be a brick wall being built as shown on the following picture.

Press the button, and the build process completes. You can also preview your application by clicking on the “play” button next to it.

Building a Flatpak

When we’re happy with our creation, the next step will be building it as a Flatpak. To do that, click on the title in the middle of the top bar, and then on the Export Bundle button.

Once the export has successfully completed, Gnome Builder will open a Nautilus file browser window showing the export directory, with the Flatpak bundle already selected.

To install the app on your system, simply double-click the icon which opens Gnome Software allowing you to install the app. On my system I had to enter my user password twice, which I take to be due to the fact we had no configured GPG key for the project. After it was installed, the application was shown alongside all of the other applications on my system. It can be seen running below.

I think this has successfully shown how easy it is to deploy an application as a Flatpak bundle for Gnome using Builder, and then running it on Fedora Silverblue.

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How to watch for releases of upstream projects

Do you want to know when a new version of your favorite project is released? Do you want to make your job as packager easier? If so, this article is for you. It introduces you to the world of release-monitoring.org. You’ll see how it can help you catch up with upstream releases.

What is release-monitoring.org?

The release-monitoring.org is a combination of two applications: Anitya and the-new-hotness.

Anitya is what you can see when visiting release-monitoring.org. You can use it to add and manage your projects. Anitya also checks for new releases periodically.

The-new-hotness is an application that catches the messages emitted by Anitya. It creates a Bugzilla issue if the project is mapped to a Fedora package.

How to use release-monitoring.org

Now that you know how it works, let’s focus on how you can use it.

Index page of release-monitoring.org

First think you need to do is to log in. Anitya provides a few options you can use to log in, including the Fedora Account System (FAS), Yahoo!, or a custom OpenID server.

Login page

When you’re logged in, you’ll see new options in the top panel.

Anitya top panel

Add a new project

Now you can add a new project. It’s always good to check whether the project is already added.

Add project form

Next, fill in the information about the project:

  • Project name – Use the upstream project name
  • Homepage – Homepage of the project
  • Backend – Backend is simply the web hosting where the project is hosted. Anitya offers many backends you can chose from. If you can’t find a backend for your project, you can use the custom backend. Every backend has its own additional fields. For example, BitBucket has you specify owner/project.
  • Version scheme – This is used to sort received versions. Right now, Anitya only supports RPM version scheme.
  • Version prefix – This is the prefix that is stripped from any received version. For example, if the tag on GitHub is version_1.2.3, you would use version_ as version prefix. The version will then be presented as 1.2.3. The version prefix v is stripped automatically.
  • Check latest release on submit – If you check this, Anitya will do an initial check on the project when submitted.
  • Distro – The distribution in which this project is used. This could be also added later.
  • Package – The project’s packaged name in the distribution. This is required when the Distro field is filled in.

When you’re happy with the project, submit it. Below you can see how your project may look after you submit.

Project page

Add a new distribution mapping

If you want to map the project to a package on a specific distribution, open up the project page first and then click on Add new distribution mapping.

Add distribution mapping form

Here you can chose any distribution already available in Anitya, fill in the package name, and submit it. The new mapping will show up on the project page.

Automatic filing of Bugzilla issues

Now you created a new project and created a mapping for it. This is nice, but how does this help you as a packager? This is where the-new-hotness comes into play.

Every time the-new-hotness sees a new update or new mapping message emitted by Anitya, it checks whether this project is mapped to a package in Fedora. For this to work, the project must have a mapping to Fedora added in Anitya.

If the package is known, the-new-hotness checks the notification setting for this package. That setting can be changed here. The last check the-new-hotness does is whether the version reported by Anitya is newer than the current version of this package in Fedora Rawhide.

If all those checks are positive, the new Bugzilla issue is filed and a Koji scratch build started. After the Koji build is finished, the Bugzilla is updated with output.

Future plans for release-monitoring.org

The release-monitoring.org system is pretty amazing, isn’t it? But this isn’t all. There are plenty of things planned for both Anitya and the-new-hotness. Here’s a short list of future plans:

Anitya

  • Add libraries.io consumer – automatically check for new releases on libraries.io, create projects in Anitya and emit messages about updates
  • Use Fedora package database to automatically guess the package name in Fedora based on the project name and backend
  • Add semantic and calendar version scheme
  • Change current cron job to service: Anitya checks for new versions periodically using a cron job. The plan is to change this to a service that checks projects using queues.
  • Support for more than one version prefix

the-new-hotness

  • File Github issues for Flathub projects when a new version comes out
  • Create pull requests in Pagure instead of filing a Bugzilla issue
  • Move to OpenShift – this should make deployment much easier than how it is now
  • Convert to Python 3 (mostly done)

Both

  • Conversion to fedora-messaging – This is already in progress and should make communication between Anitya and the-new-hotness more reliable.

Photo by Alexandre Debiève on Unsplash.

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Python 3.8 alpha in Fedora

The Python developers have released the first alpha of Python 3.8.0 and you can already try it out in Fedora! Test your Python code with 3.8 early to avoid surprises once the final 3.8.0 is out in October.

Install Python 3.8 on Fedora

If you have Fedora 29 or newer, you can install Python 3.8 from the official software repository with dnf:

$ sudo dnf install python38

As more alphas, betas and release candidates of Python 3.8 will be released, the Fedora package will receive updates. No need to compile your own development version of Python, just install it and have it up to date. New features will be added until the first beta.

Test your projects with Python 3.8

Run the python3.8 command to use Python 3.8 or create virtual environments with the builtin venv module, tox or with pipenv. For example:

$ git clone https://github.com/benjaminp/six.git
Cloning into 'six'...
$ cd six/
$ tox -e py38
py38 runtests: commands[0] | python -m pytest -rfsxX
================== test session starts ===================
platform linux -- Python 3.8.0a1, pytest-4.2.1, py-1.7.0, pluggy-0.8.1
collected 195 items

test_six.py ...................................... [ 19%]
.................................................. [ 45%]
.................................................. [ 70%]
..............................................s... [ 96%]
....... [100%]
========= 194 passed, 1 skipped in 0.25 seconds ==========
________________________ summary _________________________
py38: commands succeeded
congratulations 🙂

What’s new in Python 3.8

So far, only the first alpha was released, so more features will come. You can however already try out the new walrus operator:

$ python3.8
Python 3.8.0a1 (default, Feb 7 2019, 08:07:33)
[GCC 8.2.1 20181215 (Red Hat 8.2.1-6)] on linux
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> while not (answer := input('Say something: ')):
... print("I don't like empty answers, try again...")
...
Say something:
I don't like empty answers, try again...
Say something: Fedora
>>>

And stay tuned for Python 3.8 as python3 in Fedora 31!