Announcing the release of Fedora 30

It seems like it was just six months ago that we announced Fedora 29, and here we are again. Today, we announce our next operating system release. Even though it went so quickly, a lot has happened in the last half year, and you’ll see the results in Fedora 30.

If you’re impatient, go to https://getfedora.org/ now. For details, read on.

Variants and more

Fedora Editions are targeted outputs geared toward specific “showcase” uses. Since we first started using this concept in the Fedora 21 release, the needs of the community have continued to evolve. As part of Fedora 30, we’re combining cloud and server into the Fedora Server edition. We’re bringing in Fedora CoreOS to replace Fedora Atomic Host as our container-focused deliverable in the Fedora 30 timeframe — stay tuned for that. The Fedora Workstation edition continues to focus on delivering the latest in open source desktop tools.

Of course, we produce more than just the editions. Fedora Spins and Labs target a variety of audiences and use cases, including the Internet of Things. And, we haven’t forgotten our alternate architectures, ARM AArch64, Power, and S390x.

Fedora Workstation features GNOME 3.32 — the latest release of this popular desktop environment. GNOME 3.32 features an updated visual style, including the user interface, the icons, and the desktop itself. New to Fedora Server are Linux System Roles — a collection of roles and modules executed by Ansible to assist Linux admins in the configuration of common GNU/Linux subsystems

No matter what variant of Fedora you use, you’re getting the latest the open source world has to offer. GCC 9, Bash 5.0, and PHP 7.3 are among the many updated packages in Fedora 30. We’re excited for you to try it out. So go to https://getfedora.org/ and download it now. Or if you’re already running a Fedora release, follow the easy upgrade instructions.

Along with the release of Fedora 30, we’re moving our “Ask Fedora” support forum to the Discourse platform. Log in to Ask Fedora to try it out and watch for a Fedora Magazine article about it soon.

As always, thanks to the thousands of people who contributed in some way to the Fedora Project in this release cycle, and to the Fedora heroes who helped get this release out on schedule even with so much else going on. If you’re in Boston for Red Hat Summit next week, whether you are one of these contributors, would like to be one in the future, or just a friend, make sure to visit the Fedora booth in Community Central!

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4 cool new projects to try in COPR for April 2019

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

Joplin

Joplin is a note-taking and to-do app. Notes are written in the Markdown format, and organized by sorting them into various notebooks and using tags.
Joplin can import notes from any Markdown source or exported from Evernote. In addition to the desktop app, there’s an Android version with the ability to synchronize notes between them — using Nextcloud, Dropbox or other cloud services. Finally, there’s a browser extension for Chrome and Firefox to save web pages and screenshots.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides Joplin for Fedora 29 and 30, and for EPEL 7. To install Joplin, use these commands with sudo:

sudo dnf copr enable taw/joplin
sudo dnf install joplin

Fzy

Fzy is a command-line utility for fuzzy string searching. It reads from a standard input and sorts the lines based on what is most likely the sought after text, and then prints the selected line. In addition to command-line, fzy can be also used within vim. You can try fzy in this online demo.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides fzy for Fedora 29, 30, and Rawhide, and other distributions. To install fzy, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable lehrenfried/fzy
sudo dnf install fzy

Fondo

Fondo is a program for browsing many photographs from the unsplash.com website. It has a simple interface that allows you to look for pictures of one of several themes, or all of them at once. You can then set a found picture as a wallpaper with a single click, or share it.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides Fondo for Fedora 29, 30, and Rawhide. To install Fondo, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable atim/fondo
sudo dnf install fondo

YACReader

YACReader is a digital comic book reader that supports many comics and image formats, such as cbz, cbr, pdf and others. YACReader keeps track of reading progress, and can download comics’ information from Comic Vine. It also comes with a YACReader Library for organizing and browsing your comic book collection.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides YACReader for Fedora 29, 30, and Rawhide. To install YACReader, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable atim/yacreader
sudo dnf install yacreader

Announcing the release of Fedora 30 Beta

The Fedora Project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of Fedora 30 Beta, the next big step on our journey to the exciting Fedora 30 release.

Download the prerelease from our Get Fedora site:

Or, check out one of our popular variants, including KDE Plasma, Xfce, and other desktop environments, as well as images for ARM devices like the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3:

Beta Release Highlights

New desktop environment options

Fedora 30 Beta includes two new options for desktop environment. DeepinDE and Pantheon Desktop join GNOME, KDE Plasma, Xfce, and others as options for users to customize their Fedora experience.

DNF performance improvements

All dnf repository metadata for Fedora 30 Beta is compressed with the zchunk format in addition to xz or gzip. zchunk is a new compression format designed to allow for highly efficient deltas. When Fedora’s metadata is compressed using zchunk, dnf will download only the differences between any earlier copies of the metadata and the current version.

GNOME 3.32

Fedora 30 Workstation Beta includes GNOME 3.32, the latest version of the popular desktop environment. GNOME 3.32 features updated visual style, including the user interface, the icons, and the desktop itself. For a full list of GNOME 3.32 highlights, see the release notes.

Other updates

Fedora 30 Beta also includes updated versions of many popular packages like Golang, the Bash shell, the GNU C Library, Python, and Perl. For a full list, see the Change set on the Fedora Wiki. In addition, many Python 2 packages are removed in preparation for Python 2 end-of-life on 2020-01-01.

Testing needed

Since this is a Beta release, we expect that you may encounter bugs or missing features. To report issues encountered during testing, contact the Fedora QA team via the mailing list or in #fedora-qa on Freenode. As testing progresses, common issues are tracked on the Common F30 Bugs page.

For tips on reporting a bug effectively, read how to file a bug.

What is the Beta Release?

A Beta release is code-complete and bears a very strong resemblance to the final release. If you take the time to download and try out the Beta, you can check and make sure the things that are important to you are working. Every bug you find and report doesn’t just help you, it improves the experience of millions of Fedora users worldwide! Together, we can make Fedora rock-solid. We have a culture of coordinating new features and pushing fixes upstream as much as we can. Your feedback improves not only Fedora, but Linux and free software as a whole.

More information

For more detailed information about what’s new on Fedora 30 Beta release, you can consult the Fedora 30 Change set. It contains more technical information about the new packages and improvements shipped with this release.

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4 cool new projects to try in COPR for February 2019

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

CryFS

CryFS is a cryptographic filesystem. It is designed for use with cloud storage, mainly Dropbox, although it works with other storage providers as well. CryFS encrypts not only the files in the filesystem, but also metadata, file sizes and directory structure.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides CryFS for Fedora 28 and 29, and for EPEL 7. To install CryFS, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable fcsm/cryfs
sudo dnf install cryfs

Cheat

Cheat is a utility for viewing various cheatsheets in command-line, aiming to help remind usage of programs that are used only occasionally. For many Linux utilities, cheat provides cheatsheets containing condensed information from man pages, focusing mainly on the most used examples. In addition to the built-in cheatsheets, cheat allows you to edit the existing ones or creating new ones from scratch.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides cheat for Fedora 28, 29 and Rawhide, and for EPEL 7. To install cheat, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable tkorbar/cheat
sudo dnf install cheat

Setconf

Setconf is a simple program for making changes in configuration files, serving as an alternative for sed. The only thing setconf does is that it finds the key in the specified file and changes its value. Setconf provides only a few options to change its behavior — for example, uncommenting the line that is being changed.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides setconf for Fedora 27, 28 and 29. To install setconf, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable jamacku/setconf
sudo dnf install setconf

Reddit Terminal Viewer

Reddit Terminal Viewer, or rtv, is an interface for browsing Reddit from terminal. It provides the basic functionality of Reddit, so you can log in to your account, view subreddits, comment, upvote and discover new topics. Rtv currently doesn’t, however, support Reddit tags.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides Reddit Terminal Viewer for Fedora 29 and Rawhide. To install Reddit Terminal Viewer, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable tc01/rtv
sudo dnf install rtv
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Chromium on Fedora finally gets VAAPI support!

Do you like playing videos in your web browser? Well, good news, the Chromium web browser available in Fedora gets a Video Acceleration API support. That makes video playback much smoother while using significantly less resources.

A little bit of history

Chromium with a VAAPI patch was already available on other distributions. But this was not the case with Fedora. I really want hardware acceleration. But my love for Fedora was holding me back. Then with sheer willpower, I joined Fedora and started maintaining a package in COPR.

I am not really a distro hopper but a DE hopper. I usually jump from Gnome to KDE and vice versa depending upon my mood. Then I started maintaining Chromium with vaapi patch on COPR. I was using the official patch which was submitted upstream for code review. I had very little hope that it will get merge. The patch is outdated and and try jobs were failing at that time.

After six months, the Chromium upstream maintainers made a statement that they are not interested to include this patch. So after that I started working on my own patch with referenced from the official patch. My patch is about using the existing flags that other operating system uses instead of creating a new flag just for experimentation.

screenshot showing chromium uses video engine

Chromium uses AMDGPU’s UVD engine while playing a video

chromium's flag screenshot

Chromium uses Existing flags on Fedora

Effects of the VAAPI patch

Chromium with this patch was extremely stable on both of my machines. They both have AMD GPU. The video playback is smooth. This improved overall power savings as well.

Comparision with/without vaapi

Credits: Tobias Wolfshappen

As you can see, chromium with the vaapi patch takes up significantly less resources in comparison to chromium without the patch and Firefox.  The CPU usage went down from 120% to 10%. The playback is smooth with no shuttering.

VA-API patch in chromium for Fedora

It was then Fedora’s Engineering Manager @ Red Hat and Chromium maintainer, Tom Callaway, finally recognises the VAAPI patch and decides to include in Fedora’s Chromium browser. Fedora becomes the second distribution to include the VAAPI patch in their official Chromium package.

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4 cool new projects to try in COPR for December 2018

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

MindForger

MindForger is a Markdown editor and a notebook. In addition to features you’d expect from a Markdown editor, MindForger lets you split a single file into multiple notes. It’s easy to organize the notes and move them around between files, as well as search through them. I’ve been using MindForger for some time for my study notes, so it’s nice that it’s available through COPR now.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides MindForger for Fedora 29 and Rawhide. To install MindForger, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable deadmozay/mindforger sudo dnf install mindforger 

Clingo

Clingo is a program for solving logical problems using answer set programming (ASP) modeling language. With ASP, you can declaratively describe a problem as a logical program that Clingo then solves. As a result, Clingo produces solutions to the problem in the form of logical models, called answer sets.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides Clingo for Fedora 28 and 29. To install Clingo, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable timn/clingo sudo dnf install clingo 

SGVrecord

SGVrecord is a simple tool for recording your screen. It allows you to either capture the whole screen or select just a part of it. Furthermore, it is possible to make the record with or without sound. Sgvrecord produces files in WebM format.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides SGVrecord for Fedora 28, 29, and Rawhide. To install SGVrecord, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable youssefmsourani/sgvrecord sudo dnf install sgvrecord 

Watchman

Watchman is a service for monitoring and recording when changes are done to files.
You can specify directory trees for Watchman to monitor, as well as define actions
that are triggered when specified files are changed.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides Watchman for Fedora 29 and Rawhide. To install Watchman, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable eklitzke/watchman sudo dnf install watchman 
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Fedora 29 on ARM on AWS

This week Amazon announced their new A1 arm64 EC2 Instances powered by their arm64 based Graviton Processors and, with a minor delay, the shiny new Fedora 29 for aarch64 (arm64) is now available to run there too!

Details on getting running on AWS is in this good article on using AWS tools on Fedora article and over all using Fedora on the AWS arm64 EC2 is the same as x86_64.

So while a new architecture on AWS is very exciting it’s at the same time old and boring! You’ll get the same versions of kernel, same features like SELinux and the same versions of the toolchain stacks, like the latest gcc, golang, rust etc in Fedora 29 just like all other architectures. You’ll also get all the usual container tools like podman, buildah, skopeo and kubernetes, and orchestration tools like ansible. Basically if you’re using Fedora on AWS you should be able use it in the same way on arm64.

Getting started

The initial launch of A1 aarch64 instances are available in the following four regions: US East (N. Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (Oregon), Europe (Ireland). Direct links to launch the Fedora aarch64 AMIs directly are available here on the Fedora Cloud site.

Getting help

The Fedora support for aarch64 is very robust. It’s been widely used and tested across a number of platforms but of course with new users and new use cases will pick up issues that we’ve yet to encounter. So what is the best way to get help? If you’re having a crash in a particular application it should be reported in the usual way through RH Bugzilla, we have an ARMTracker tracker alias to block against to help identify Arm issues. For assistance with Arm specific queries and issues the Fedora Arm mailing list and we have the #fedora-arm IRC channel on Freenode.

Known issues

We have one known issue. The instance takes a while to get started, it can be up to 5 minutes. This is due to entropy and has been a general problem in virtual environments, across all architectures. We’re working to speed this up and it should be fixed soon. Once things are up an running though everything runs as expected.

Upcoming features

There will be Fedora 29 Atomic host coming in the next Two Week Atomic release, we unfortunately missed their release this time by a small window but it’ll be available in about 2 weeks with their next release and will appear on the site once released. We can’t let you have all the fun at once 😉

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4 cool new projects to try in COPR for October 2018

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in the standard Fedora repositories. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the standard set of Fedora Fedora packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

GitKraken

GitKraken is a useful git client for people who prefer a graphical interface over command-line, providing all the features you expect. Additionally, GitKraken can create repositories and files, and has a built-in editor. A useful feature of GitKraken is the ability to stage lines or hunks of files, and to switch between branches fast. However, in some cases, you may experience performance issues with larger projects.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides GitKraken for Fedora 27, 28, 29 and Rawhide, and for OpenSUSE Tumbleweed. To install GitKraken, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable elken/gitkraken sudo dnf install gitkraken

Music On Console

Music On Console player, or mocp, is a simple console audio player. It has an interface similar to the Midnight Commander and is easy use. You simply navigate to a directory with music files and select a file or directory to play. In addition, mocp provides a set of commands, allowing it to be controlled directly from command line.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides Music On Console player for Fedora 28 and 29. To install mocp, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable Krzystof/Moc sudo dnf install moc

cnping

Cnping is a small graphical ping tool for IPv4, useful for visualization of changes in round-trip time. It offers an option to control the time period between each packet as well as the size of data sent. In addition to the graph shown, cnping provides basic statistics on round-trip times and packet loss.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides cnping for Fedora 27, 28, 29 and Rawhide. To install cnping, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable dreua/cnping sudo dnf install cnping

Pdfsandwich

Pdfsandwich is a tool for adding text to PDF files which contain text in an image form — such as scanned books. It uses optical character recognition (OCR) to create an additional layer with the recognized text behind the original page. This can be useful for copying and working with the text.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides pdfsandwich for Fedora 27, 28, 29 and Rawhide, and for EPEL 7. To install pdfsandwich, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable merlinm/pdfsandwich sudo dnf install pdfsandwich
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4 cool new projects to try in COPR for July 2018

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

Hledger

Hledger is a command-line program for tracking money or other commodities. It uses a simple, plain-text formatted journal for storing data and double-entry accounting. In addition to the command-line interface, hledger offers a terminal interface and a web client that can show graphs of balance on the accounts.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides hledger for Fedora 27, 28, and Rawhide. To install hledger, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable kefah/HLedger sudo dnf install hledger

Neofetch

Neofetch is a command-line tool that displays information about the operating system, software, and hardware. Its main purpose is to show the data in a compact way to take screenshots. You can configure Neofetch to display exactly the way you want, by using both command-line flags and a configuration file.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides Neofetch for Fedora 28. To install Neofetch, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable sysek/neofetch sudo dnf install neofetch

Remarkable

Remarkable is a Markdown text editor that uses the GitHub-like flavor of Markdown. It offers a preview of the document, as well as the option to export to PDF and HTML. There are several styles available for the Markdown, including an option to create your own styles using CSS. In addition, Remarkable supports LaTeX syntax for writing equations and syntax highlighting for source code.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides Remarkable for Fedora 28 and Rawhide. To install Remarkable, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable neteler/remarkable sudo dnf install remarkable

Aha

Aha (or ANSI HTML Adapter) is a command-line tool that converts terminal escape sequences to HTML code. This allows you to share, for example, output of git diff or htop as a static HTML page.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides aha for Fedora 26, 27, 28, and Rawhide, EPEL 6 and 7, and other distributions. To install aha, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable scx/aha sudo dnf install aha