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GotM.io–Free Godot Hosting

GotM.io (Game Of the Month) is a completely free hosting services for hosting and sharing your Godot developed game.  In just a few moments you can host your Godot developed game by simply uploading the PCK file.

First you need to be able to generate a PCK file, a process we just described in this tutorial.  With your generated PCK file, you simply have to register and account using your GitHub, Gmail or Twitter credentials and upload.  Gotm.io recently launched the Game Hosting Dashboard enabling you to configure your home page and manage installed games.

This is just the beginning of GotM.  According to their roadmap there are a number of great features coming down the road including statistics, leaderboards, commenting, achievements, remote play together and more.  Check out GotM.io in action, including how easy it is to make and publish a Godot title in the video below.

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JetBrains Mono–A Font For Programmers

JetBrains, the makers of programmer tools such as IntelliJ, WebStorm, CLion and Rider, as well as the programming language Kotlin have been working on a font specifically designed for code.  JetBrains Mono is an open source font family consisting of 8 fonts specifically designed with reading and writing code in mind.

Details from the JetBrains blog:

For the most part of our day we, as developers, look at the code. And it is no wonder that we are always on the lookout for the best font to make looking at the text on the screen easier on our eyes. However, the logic in many popular fonts does not always take into account the difference between reading through code and reading a book. Our eyes move along code in a very different way, often having to move vertically as often as they do horizontally, which is opposed to reading a book where they slide along the text always in the same direction.

Therefore, while working on JetBrains Mono we focused, among other things, on the issues that can cause eye fatigue during long sessions of working with code. We have considered things like the size and shape of letters; the amount of space between them, a balance naturally engineered in monospace fonts; unnecessary details and unclear distinctions between symbols, such as I’s and l’s for example; and programming ligatures when developing our font.

Today, we proudly present JetBrains Mono – a new open-source typeface specifically made for developers. Check out what makes JetBrains Mono unique in the big family of monospaced fonts and try it in your favorite code editor. Have a look at JetBrains Mono, your eyes will thank you for it.

More details about Mono are available here.  It is the default font on all 2020 JetBrains IDEs and is available as an option in version 2019.3 and beyond of all JetBrain products.  If you use another IDE you can download the zip here.  Learn more about JetBrains Mono, including how to install and configure in Visual Studio Code in the video below.

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Vulkan 1.2 Released

The Khronos Group have just announced the release of Vulkan 1.2.  Containing 23 extensions, there are plenty of quality of life improvements for Vulkan developers in the 1.2 release including HLSL support, the new timeline sempaphore, a formal memory model and more.

Details of the Vulkan 1.2 release:

Today, The Khronos® Group, an open consortium of industry-leading companies creating advanced interoperability standards, announces the release of the Vulkan® 1.2 specification for GPU acceleration. This release integrates 23 proven extensions into the core Vulkan API, bringing significant developer-requested access to new hardware functionality, improved application performance, and enhanced API usability. Multiple GPU vendors have certified conformant implementations, and significant open source tooling is expected during January 2020.

Vulkan continues to evolve by listening to developer needs, shipping new functionality as extensions, and then consolidating extensions that receive positive developer feedback into a unified core API specification. Carefully selected API features are made optional to enable market-focused implementations. Many Vulkan 1.2 features were requested by developers to meet critical needs in their engines and applications, including: timeline semaphores for easily managed synchronization; a formal memory model to precisely define the semantics of synchronization and memory operations in different threads; descriptor indexing to enable reuse of descriptor layouts by multiple shaders; deeper support for shaders written in HLSL, and more.

All three major GPU providers support Vulkan 1.2 today, as well as Mesa drivers on AMD devices.  If you are a developer looking to learn Vulkan Resources Page on GitHub is perhaps the best place to get started.  If you want to learn more about Vulkan 1.2’s release be sure to check out the video below.

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VVVVVV Open Sourced

Terry Cavanagh, the author of VVVVVV, Super Hexagon and Dicey Dungeons, just released the source code for VVVVVV to celebrate it’s 10th anniversary.  Released on GitHub under a custom license, the repository includes both the Mobile (Flash/ActionScript) and Desktop (C++) versions.  It does not include the binary data however, although you can use the free version or you can currently buy VVVVVV for 73% Off On Humble right now.

Details of the release from the DistractionWare blog:

Or possibly tomorrow is, depending on who you ask – technically, the game first went live at 3am GMT on the 11th January 2010, after a very, very long day of fixing every last bug I could, making last minute builds, and trying to slowly upload everything on an extremely unreliable internet connection that kept cutting out. But I’ve always gone by “it’s not tomorrow until you wake up” rules, so I still think of January the 10th as the real launch day <3

Gosh, ten years.

VVVVVV is such an important game to me, I barely even know where to start. I wanted to do something special to mark the occasion: so, as of today, I’m releasing the game’s source code!

The repo contains two versions – the desktop version, ported to C++ by Simon Roth in 2011, and later updated and maintained by Ethan Lee – and the mobile version, written in Actionscript for Adobe AIR, based on the original v1.0 flash version of the game.

I wanna give a big big thank you to Ethan Lee, who helped a lot to prepare for this, including getting the repo ready for the public, and organising the reveal on AGDQ (hi speedrunners!)! Thanks Ethan!

You can learn more about the release in the video below.

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ArmorPaint 0.7 Released

ArmorPaint just released version 0.7 containing several new features including additional texture file formats, plugin support and even live preview support for Unity and Unreal game engines.  ArmorPaint is built on top of the Armory3D game engine (tutorial available here) and is an open source alternative to Substance Painter.

Details from the release notes:

  • Added support for .psd, .bmp, .gif formats
  • Added single material export
  • Added blend modes for layers
  • Added blend modes for brush
  • Added plugin manager
  • Added ‘auto-save’ plugin
  • Added ‘hello-node’ plugin – custom material node
  • Added ‘console’ plugin – run commands
  • Added ‘profiler’ plugin – performance graph
  • Added ‘converter’ plugin – convert .arm files into .json
  • Added ‘import_tiff’ plugin – support for .tiff format
  • Added ‘import_stl’ plugin – support for .stl format
  • Added ‘import_gltf’ plugin – support for .gltf/.glb format (alpha)
  • Added ‘uv_unwrap’ plugin – auto-generate uvs / unwrap active mesh
  • Added ‘theme-editor’ plugin
  • Added box selection to node editor
  • Added per-fill-layer uv control
  • Added option to split .obj mesh by groups or materials
  • Added ‘decal tool – scale x’ option for non-square decals
  • Added ‘menu – file – reimport mesh’
  • Added ‘menu – viewport – split view’
  • Added ‘preferences – restore’ button
  • Added ‘preferences – native file browser’ option
  • Added ‘preferences – viewport – vignette’ option
  • Added ‘preferences – usage – dilate radius’ option
  • Added texture export presets
  • Added ‘layer’ material node – drop layer onto node canvas
  • Added ‘layer mask’ material node – drop layer mask onto node canvas
  • Added ‘blur (image)’ material node
  • Added experimental dxr build
  • Added path-trace (dxr) viewport mode
  • Added ao (dxr) bake
  • Added bent normal (dxr) bake
  • Added lightmap (dxr) bake
  • Added thickness (dxr) bake
  • Added normal-map bake from high-poly
  • Added height bake from high-poly
  • Added dilation pass to baking
  • Added ‘up axis’ option for relevant bake types
  • Added support for drag and dropping multiple files at once
  • Added popup for editing RGBA node sockets
  • Improved gizmo
  • Improved height paint
  • Improved .obj importer
  • Improved .blend importer
  • Improved outliner
  • Improved node drawing performance
  • Improved layer handling performance
  • Improved key detection on linux
  • Fixed handling of accented filepaths
  • Fixed brush mask on linux
  • Fixed copy-paste on linux
  • Fixed window title updating on linux
  • Fixed file association
  • Fixed envmap import
  • Fixed object mask for fill layers
  • Fixed height displacement scale
  • Fixed blurry text on windows
  • Fixed texture filtering option for image node
  • Fixed key repeat for text edit
  • Updated dark and light themes
  • Updated menu bar structure
  • Reduced gpu memory usage
  • Faster texture loading
  • Undo for layer opacity and blending
  • Undo for node canvas
  • Adjustable viewport clip distance
  • Remember window size and position
  • Open node search on link drag
  • Resizable ui panels
  • Duplicate material
  • Use brush ruler (shift) to draw lines
  • Auto-set 2x scale on high-res displays
  • Flat shading for viewport modes inspecting pbr channels
  • Picker tool works on non-base layer
  • Picker tool shows texture coordinate in 2d view
  • Export single texture from textures tab
  • Eraser takes hardness and opacity into account
  • Export textures as udim tiles for udim projects
  • Download ‘texture-synthesis’ plugin preview
  • Download Unreal Engine live-link preview
  • Download Unity Engine live-link preview

If you want to build ArmorPaint from source you can learn more about the process here.  You can see ArmorPaint in action in the video below.

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Building ArmorPaint From Source

ArmorPaint is an open source competitor to Substance Painter, from the creator of the Armory game engine (tutorial series available here).  It is available for just 16 Euro in binary form, but can also be built from source code.  This guide walks you step by step through the process of building ArmorPaint from source.

There are a few requirements before you can build.  Download and install the following programs if not already installed:

First step, we clone the repository.  Make sure to add the –recursive flag(that’s two ‘-‘ by the way).

Open a command prompt, cd to the directory where you want to install ArmorPaint’s source code and run the command:

git clone –recursive https://github.com/armory3d/armorpaint.git

Depending on your internet speed this could take a minute to several minutes while all of the files are downloaded. 

In Explorer, go the installation directory, then navigate to armorpaint\Kromx\V8\Libraries\win32\release and using 7zip extract v8_monolith.7z to the same directory as the .7z file.

Next in the command prompt run the following commands

(Assuming you are reusing the same CMD that you did the git clone from)

cd armorpaint

node Kromx/make –g direct3d11

cd Kromx

node Kinc/make –g direct3d11

explorer .

If you receive any errors above, the most likely cause is node not being installed.  The final command will now open a Windows Explorer window in the Kromx subdirectory.  Open the build directory and load the file Krom.sln.

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This will open the project in Visual Studio.  If you haven’t run VS yet,you may have to do some initial installation steps.  Worst case scenario run through the initial install, close and double click Krom.sln again.

First make sure that you are building for x64 and Release mode at the top:

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In the Solution Explorer, select Krom then hit ALT + ENTER or right click and select Properties.

Then select Debugging, in Command Arguments enter ..\..\build.krom then click Apply.

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You are now ready to build ArmorPaint.  Select Ctrl + SHIFT + B or select Build->Build Solution.

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Assuming no errors, are exe should be built.  Now go to the folder armorpaint\Kromx\build\x64\Release and copy the file Krom.exe, then copy to armorpaint\build\krom.  You can now run Krom.exe and you’re good to go. 

image

Step by step instructions are available in the video below.

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Spriter 2 Alchemist Kickstarter

BrashMonkey have just launched a Kickstarter campaign Spriter 2 Alchemist.  Alchemist is an extension to the upcoming Spriter 2 Pro 2D animation system that adds procedural content generation and animation support.  Existing Spriter Pro customers are offered a preferred rate when backing Spriter 2 Alchemist.  The tiers break down as follows:

As of writing the Kickstarter is about 10% of the way towards it $50,000USD goal with 27 days to go.  Full details of the features of Spriter 2 Alchemist are available on the Kickstarter page, as well as discussed in more detail in the video below.

Spriter is not the only 2D animation package available and we have covered a number of them previously here on GameFromScratch.  A run-down of free 2D animation tools is available here on DevGa.me, while we have done feature videos on Spine, Creature(video), COATools for Blender (video) and Dragonbones(video) if you are looking for an alternative.

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GDevelop 5 Beta 84 Released

The open source 2D game engine GDevelop just released beta 84 of their 5.0.0 branch.  Major features of b84 are BBCode formatting support, dozens of new layer effects, improvements to the integrated pixel graphics editor and more.

New features in beta 84 from the release notes:

  • Add dozens of new effects for layers, and allow developers to easily create extensions bringing new effects.

    • See an (incomplete!) list of effects available on the wiki.
    • Thanks @Bouh and @blurymind for porting, trying and setting up these new effects for GDevelop: Black and White, Noise, CRT, Godray, Tilt shift, Advanced bloom, Kawase blur, Zoom blur, Displacement, Color Map, Pixelate, Reflection.
    • Want to add a new shader effect to GDevelop? Take a look at the explanations about effects here.
    • Support for effects on objects will be added in a next version
  • New object BBText (thanks @blurymind!)

  • Improvements in Piskel sprite editor (thanks @blurymind!)

    • Color index shift brush (useful for cell shading sprites)
    • Ability to source all layers when using the bucket tool
    • Palette transfer tool (apply the currently selected palette colors to the frame you are on)
  • Add an option to automatically resize game resolution to window or screen size. It’s recommended to activate it especially for games on mobile phones.

Be sure to check the complete release notes for more details of the release.  You can learn more about GDevelop in our hands-on video embedded below.

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Unreal Engine January 2020 Free Content

Every month on the first Tuesday, Epic Games give away several items from the Unreal Engine marketplace and January 2020 is no exception.  This month there are 5 free for January items as well as 1 more free forever item.  So long as you “purchase” the item before the start of next month’s giveaway, it is yours forever.

This months free items are:

Permanently Free

Free For January

You can learn more about the Unreal Asset giveaway on the Unreal Engine blog, or by watching the video below.

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3DBuzz Shut Down And Release Content For Free

3DBuzz is one of the original online learning resources for computer graphics, programming and game development, first launching way back in 2002.  Until recently the site was completely commercial, with prices set on a per course basis or available under a monthly subscription.  They announced they will be shutting down, for the most unfortunate of reasons, and have released all of their content for free download.

Details from 3dbuzz.com:

Hello everyone,

The 3D Buzz community has been amazing and inspirational for 2 decades. However, all good things…

3D Buzz, Inc has closed its doors. Subscription and recurring payments have already been suspended. This page is our final gift to such a wonderful community. Below you will find download links to all of our available material, free of charge.

Thank you for so many years of support. You are all, truly, the best community anyone could hope for. May we see each other again somewhere in the ether…

From all of us to all of you,

Remember to always look, listen, and learn.

Goodbye, good health, and good luck.

If you visit 3DBuzz.com you may get a security warning, this seems to be linked to an invalid SSL certificate and can be ignored.  The entire content of the site add up to over 200+GB in size.  As a result, some readers over on Reddit have been working to set up torrents, so if you are interested in grabbing the entire archive of video tutorials, be sure to check out that thread.  Otherwise you can download each video one by one in zip format.

Thank you for your generous gift 3DBuzz and our condolences on your loss.

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