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How to Create a Computer Screen in Cinema 4D: Part 2

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a 3D Computer Screen model to use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning Cinema 4D quickly. 

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, importing reference images, adding lighting to the scene and basic rendering techniques.

In the first part of the two-part tutorial, I showed you how to:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the Computer Screen

In this, the second part of the the tutorial series, I’ll show you how to:

  • How to Create Colored Materials
  • How to Add Lighting to the Scene
  • How to Render the Computer Monitor

9. How to Convert State to Object

Step 1

Select all the objects associated with the Boole modifier. This will include the two cube objects that make up the computer screen.

Apply boole to computer monitor objects

Step 2

With the Boole objects still selected, go to Mesh > Conversion > Current State to Object

Convert current state to object

Step 3

This creates a version of the computer screen objects with all the modifiers collapsed. This means that the new objects lose their modifiers, but retain their shapes so that we can colour them easily. 

You can delete the original boole objects as they won’t be needed in the project anymore. 

Two copies of the same object will appear

Step 4

Feel free to rename the objects to something which is easily recognisable.  

Rename 3D objects

Step 5

Select the neck object and go to Mesh > Conversion > Current State to Object. Once you’ve create the new object, you can delete the original one to avoid clutter and confusion.

Convert neck into object

Step 6

Select the Phong Tags and press the delete key on the keyboard to remove them. 

Delete phong tags

10. How to Create a New Material

Step 1

Located near the bottom of the screen there is a material selection window. Click on Create > New Material to create a new material to use that you can edit. 

Materials are used to colour in the various objects and parts of the Computer Screen.

Select new material

Step 2

Double click on the new material icon (displayed as a sphere). This brings up the Material Editor where you can adjust the various properties of the material such as the colour, transparency and reflectance. 

For this particular style I’m only be interested in flat colour (Luminance).

Open up the material editor

Step 3

Tick the button for Luminance and untick the boxes for Color and Reflectance. This gives the cel shaded look for the final image. 

Select luminance

Step 4

Colour the Computer Monitor by adding the material to the object. Drag and drop the material to the object using the mouse. You can also drag and drop the material onto the object listed on the right of the screen. 

Apply the new material to the computer screen

11. How to Adjust the Material Properties

Step 1

In the Material Editor, click on the arrow button next to Texture and select Sketch and Toon > Cel from the menu.

Select Sketch and Toon

Step 2

Click on the new Cel button that appears next to Texture to bring up a new menu.

Click on the cel button

Step 3

In this new menu, adjust the settings as follows:

  • Change the Diffuse to match the image at below. It should be grey scale with the colour getting light from left to right
  • Deselect Camera
  • Select Lights
  • Select Shadows 
  • Select Multiply from the drop down menu
Adjust the cel settings

Step 4

Select a colour by double-clicking on the color option box . 

The Material Editor gives many different options for choosing and picking colours. These include RGB, HSV and so on. 

Choose whichever option you are most familiar with as a flat colour. Because of the Multiply shading mode, the different colour shades also appear in the material.

If the material has already been applied to the model, the colour of the model is automatically be adjusted to the new material colour. This is useful if you change your mind on a certain colour or a certain part of the Computer Screen model.

Select a color and set shading mode to multiply

Step 5

Because I’ve already applied the material to the model, the colour of the Computer Monitor will automatically be adjusted to match the new material.  

New material settings will be applied

12. How to Adjust the Shading

Step 1

To get a better idea of the shading and how the render will turn out as you work on it, click and hold on the Render Button and select Interactive Render Region from the menu. 

Select interactive render region

Step 2

Use the mouse to adjust the selection window so that it fits around the Computer Screen model. Look for the very small arrow on the right hand side of the window and use the mouse to drag it to the top right corner of the box (this increases the resolution). 

Decrease the resolution by moving the arrow down if you find that the performance is decreasing.

Increase the resolution of the preview window

Step 3

To change the way the light source is facing go to Options > Default Light.

You can also add a light object to the scene if you are more comfortable working that way.  

Select default light

Step 4

Change the light source in the Default Light window. Click where you’d like the light source to come from on the sphere and it will sync with the view port. Experiment with different lighting positions to come up with a lighting situation that you like. 

This can be adjusted at anytime so you can change the lighting again if you changed your mind.

Adjust the default light

Step 5

Secondary-click on the arrow and select Alpha Mode in order to reveal the rest of the viewport. Some people may find working this way easier.

Select the alpha mode

13. Other Lighting Solutions

Step 1

To set up the basic lighting, go to the Floor button located in the top menu bar. Primary-Click-Hold and then select Physical Sky from the menu.

Select physical sky

Step 2

Make sure that Physical Sky is selected in the menu on the right, a new menu will appear on the bottom right of the screen. Select the Time and Location tab and choose a time using the left and right arrow keys. 

This changes the lighting of the scene (according to the time of the day). Choose a suitable time to light up the scene. You’ll see how the lighting affects the scene in the viewport.

Adjust the time and location

Step 3

To add a light to the scene, select the Add Light button in the top menu bar at the top of the screen.

This creates a Light Object which you can move around the scene. Move the light object using the Move Tool to a suitable position.

Select the add light button

Step 4

To customise the lighting further, experiment with the light object options in the bottom right of the screen. Here you can adjust the Intensity, Light Type and even Color.

Adjust the lighting settings

14. How to Colour the Computer Monitor Screen

Step 1

Open up the Material Editor and change material color to the following:

  • R: 194
  • G: 222
  • B: 236

This changes the basic colour of the computer that you can add to the other main objects (i.e. the neck).

Select a new color for the material

Step 2

To create a new material we can duplicate the material by holding CTRL on the keyboard and then using the mouse to click and drag the material to the side.

Duplicate the material

Step 3

Double-click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there we can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 56
  • G: 47
  • B: 66
Select a purple color for the new material

Step 4

Apply the new materials to the screen by clicking and dragging it directly onto the screen object.

Apply the new material to the screen

15. How to Color the Monitor Bezel 

Step 1

Create a new material. You may also duplicate a previous material in order to keep the same settings as before.

Double-click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there you can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 70
  • G: 69
  • B: 65
Create a new dark grey material

Step 2

Use the Polygon Selection Tool to select all the polygons that make up the bezel of the computer monitor.

Select the screen boder with the polygon selection tool

Step 3

Apply the new material to the selected polygons by clicking and dragging it into the selection. 

Apply dark grey material to the selected border

Step 4

Now that all the materials and colours have been applied to the model, use the perspective view to look around the computer screen to ensure that the colours have been applied properly.

Check the 3D model from all angles

16. How to Create the Power Button 

Part 1

Click on the small back arrow on the Cube button and select Cylinder from the list of options. This will spawn a Cylinder in the scene.

Create a new cylinder object

Part 2

Rotate the cylinder 90 degrees and then use the Scale Tool to scale it down to the appropriate size of a power button.

Rotate and scale the new cylinder

Part 3

Delete the Phong Tag from the newly created cylinder object.

Delete the phong tag

Part 4

Use the Polygon Selection Tool to select the base polygons making up a circle. Press the delete key to remove the polygons from the cylinder object. 

Select the base of the cylinder object and delete it

Part 5

Use the Edge Selection Tool to select the edges of the open hole and then use the Scale Tool to make it larger. 

Select the edges of the cylinder and expand it

Part 6

Once you are happy with the size of your power button, use the mouse to secondary-click the selected edges. Select Close Polygon Hole from the menu.

Cap the empty hole

17. How to use Boole

Step 1

Click on the small black arrow in the bottom right corner of the Array Tool in the top menu bar. Then select Boole from the list. This creates a Boole tool in the list of objects on the right of the screen.

Select boole from the menu

Step 2

Drag and drop both the screen and the new cylinder object into the boole. Ensure that the screen object is above the cylinder object. This will create the power button in the screen.

Add the screen and cylinder objects to the boole

Step 3

With the boole objects still selected, go to Mesh > Conversion > Current State to Object. This will create a copy of the objects with the boole collapsed.

Select the bool and convert current state to object

Step 4

Use the Polygon Selection Tool to select the power button. Then drag and drop the dark grey material colour into the selection.

Select the polygons of the power button and apply a material

Step 5

Check the camera and perspective view to make sure that the computer screen looks correct. Make any final adjustments to the materials to get the colour combination that you want.

Check the model from all angles

The End Result

The computer screen model is now ready for use and to render. Now that the project is complete you can repeat the steps above and change the camera or the view port to create a new image from a different angle. 

Throughout the course of the project you have successfully learnt:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the Computer Screen
  • How to Create Coloured Materials
  • How to Add Lighting to the Scene
  • How to Render the Computer Monitor

Feel free to share your own creations below. You can also export your image into Adobe Photoshop to enhance it further or to use it as part of a larger image.

The final computer model

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How to Create a Computer Screen in Cinema 4D: Part 1

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a 3D Computer Screen model that you can use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning Cinema 4D quickly. 

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, importing reference images, adding lighting to the scene and basic rendering techniques.

In this, the first part of the two-part tutorial, I’ll show you:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the Computer Screen

1. How to Import Reference Images

Step 1

Use the middle mouse button to click anywhere on the viewport. This displays all four views. From there, use the middle mouse button to select the Right view.

Four camera views

Step 2

In the Attributes tab select Mode > View Settings.

View settings

Step 3

In Viewport [Right] select the Back button and click on the button next to Image. 

Select background image

Step 4

Select the reference image from the finder and open it.

Computer monitor background image

Step 5

Once the image is displayed in the background of the viewport, change the transparency of the image. This can sometimes make it easier to model from the reference image.

Change the position and size of the reference image from here using Offset X, Offset Y, Size X and Size Y.

Adjust the transparency

2. How to Model the Computer Screen

Step 1

To start modelling the face computer screen, select the Cube object from the top menu bar. This spawns a cube in the viewport.

Create a cube object

Step 2

Use the reference image of the computer screen in the Front View to help adjust the cube. 

Use the Scale Tool to make the shape of the cube match up with the shape of the computer screen in the image.

Ensure that you use the other views (front, left, right, perspective etc) to check that the shape looks correct from every angle.

Adjust the size of the cube object

Step 3

In the perspective view, use the Scale Tool to increase or reduce the thickness of the shape so that it is close to the thickness of a computer screen. 

The Move Tool widget also allows you to adjust the the cube along different axis (x, y and z). Simply click on the small orange dots that are found next to each arrow and drag along the respective axis to edit the object.

Make the object thinner

Step 4

Select the Edge Selection Tool. Use the Edge Selection Tool to select all four corners of the object. The selected edges will be highlighted in orange.

Use the edge selection tool

Step 5

Make sure to move around the object to select the opposite corners of the object.

Select the corner edges

Step 6

Once the edges have been selected, use the mouse to right click on the selected edges. In the menu that appears, find Bevel and select it.

Use the bevel tool

Step 7

In the adjustment window (usually located in the bottom right of the screen), play around with the following:

  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer
  • Offset Mode: Fixed Distance
  • Offset: 31cm
  • Subdivision: 10
  • Depth: 100%

Feel free to adjust the sliders and values until you are satisfied with the object’s appearance.

Adjust the bevel settings

Step 8

In the images below you can see how the edges are effected once the values have been changed. Increase the number of subdivisions to increase the smoothness of the corner.

Curve the corners

Step 9

Use the reference image of the computer screen in your Front View to help adjust the cube. Use the Scale Tool to make the shape of the cube match up with the shape of the computer screen in the image.

Compare with the background image

3. How to Adjust the shape of the Monitor

Step 1

Use the Polygon Selection Tool to select the back of the object. Then use the Scale Tool and click and drag from anywhere within the preview window to decrease the size of the polygon. 

Scale back of the monitor

Step 2

Next to each object you create you will find the Phong Tag. This is responsible for adjusting the smoothness of an object. You can adjust the angle limit to increase or decrease the smoothness of an object. 

However since we are going for a low poly look we don’t need this. So delete the Phong Tag to remove any smoothness in the model edges.

Delete phong tag

Step 3

Use the Edge Selection Tool to select the front edges of the computer monitor. The select the Bevel Tool (you can access this by right clicking on the edges).

In the adjustment window (usually located in the bottom right of the screen), play around with the following:

  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer
  • Offset Mode: Radial
  • Offset: 8cm
  • Subdivision: 0
Bevel the front facing edges

4. Modify the Topology Using the Knife Tool

Step 1

Once you are happy with the overall shape of the computer monitor we need to convert it into an object. This will allow us to make further edits such as topology.

Make sure that the computer monitor is still selected and then go to Mesh > Conversion > Current State to Object.

Convert current state to object

Step 2

Right click on the object and select the Knife Tool from the menu.

Select knife tool

Step 3

Use the Knife Tool to create an edge near the bottom. You can use the tool to connect one side of the screen to the other.

Cut across the monitor

5. How to Create the Monitor Display

Step 1

In the top menu bar select the Cube to spawn a cube into the scene. Adjust the size of the cube so that it fits nicely within the previous monitor object. 

Create the monitor display

6. Use the Bend Deformer to Create the Neck

Step 1

In the top menu bar select the Cube to spawn another cube into the scene and adjust the shape so that it forms a thin neck shape. You can adjust the object properties as follows:

  • Size X: 200
  • Size Y: 340
  • Size Z: 30
Adjust the cube

Step 2

In order to curve the neck we need to add some segments. In the adjustments window add enough segments to ensure that the curve will appear smooth (in this example I’ve used 50 Y segments).

Add segments to the object

Step 3

In order to create a suitable bend to the computer neck you will need to use the Bend Deformer. Select the Bend button from the top menu bar. 

This spawns a bend deformer object in the list view.

Select the bend deformer

Step 4

In the list view move the Bend Deformer into the neck object. This means that the deformer will affect and influence the cube object only.

Apply the bend deformer

Step 5

With the Bend Deformer selected make sure that Fit to Parent has been ticked. The ensures that the deformer affects the whole neck.

Select fit to parent

Step 6

With the Bend Deformer still selected, go to the parameters box and play around with the Strength

In this tutorial I used the following settings:

  • Strength: 150
  • Angle: -90
Bend deformer settings

Step 7

Use a combination of the Move Tool and the Rotation Tool to place the neck in the correct position underneath the computer monitor.

Move and rotate the neck

7. How to Model the Neck

Step 1

Once you are happy with the placement of the neck we need to convert it into an object. This will collapse the object properties and will allow us to make further edits.

Make sure that the neck is still selected and then go to Mesh > Conversion > Current State to Object.

Convert current state to object

Step 2

Use the Polygon Selection Tool to select the top of the neck. Then use the Move Tool to extend the neck. This will help connect the neck to the computer monitor.

Extend the top of the neck

8. Create the Base of the Computer Monitor

Step 1

Use the Polygon Selection Tool to select the bottom of the neck. Then use the Move Tool to extend it. This will help create the base of the monitor.

Extend the base of the monitor

Step 2

Use the Move Tool to make sure that the neck is in the correct position underneath the computer monitor.

Use move tool to position objects

Step 3

Use the Edge Selection Tool to select the two front facing corners.

Select base corners

Step 4

Right-click on the corners and select the Bevel Tool

Select the bevel tool

Step 5

Use the Bevel Tool to curve the corners of the base. In the edit window, you can change the settings to the following:

  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer 
  • Offset Mode: Fixed Distance
  • Offset: 72 cm
  • Subdivision: 30
  • Depth: 100%
Curve the base corners

Step 6

Click on the small black arrow in the bottom right corner of the Bend Tool in the top menu bar. Then select Taper from the list. This creates a Taper tool in the list of objects on the right of the screen.

Select the taper tool

Step 7

Select the Taper tool and drag it into the Cube object. This will apply the Taper features to the cube which will enable some shape manipulation options.

Apply the taper tool to the base

Step 8

The Taper Tool only affects the area within the cage (this is visualised as a see through cube with purple lines as edges). Use the Rotate Tool to rotate the cage 90 degrees and move it down so that the base is within the cage area.

Move the cage

Step 9

Use the Scale Tool to reduce the cage size so that it only effects the base of the computer monitor. 

Scale the cage to fit the base

Step 10

With the Taper Tool selected, go to the adjustments menu and edit the settings to create a suitable base shape. If the shape is not deforming correctly, try flipping the cage or moving it to a different area. You can input the following:

  • Mode: Limited
  • Strength: -50%
  • Curvature: 0%
Adjust the taper tool settings

Coming Next…

In the second part of the the tutorial series, I’ll show you how to:

  • How to Create Coloured Materials
  • How to Add Lighting to the Scene
  • How to Render the Computer Monitor
Final computer monitor model
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Want the Secret to Insta-Success? Enrol in the School of Instagram

Why do some people seem to gain Instagram followers effortlessly, while others struggle to get any traction? Find the answer by enrolling in the School of Instagram. It’s completely free to join, and the lessons you learn will take your Instagram account to the next level.

Here’s a quick overview of what you can learn from the School of Instagram. (Hint: it’s just a fraction of what’s on the site itself, so you might want to dive right in and get started with your first free lesson right away!)

1. How to Stand Out on Instagram

Instagram has over a billion active users, with over 100 million photos and videos uploaded every day. How can you possibly stand out in such a crowded field?

Start by binge-reading the ten dedicated lessons in the School of Instagram’s first subject area: How to Stand Out on Instagram.

You’ll learn, among many other things, how to:

How to write an Instagram caption

Successful Instagrammers seem to do all these things naturally, but the truth is that they’ve spent years honing their techniques and learning what works and what doesn’t. The School of Instagram helps you take a massive shortcut and begin using these tried-and-tested tactics right away.

2. How to Plan Your Instagram Content

What do you mean, you don’t plan your Instagram content?

If you’re just using Instagram to connect with friends and family, it’s fine to post off-the-cuff photos of whatever’s happening in your life from moment to moment. But if you want to use Instagram to reach a wider audience, you need to be more strategic. Learn how to do that in Part 2 of the School of Instagram’s curriculum: How to Plan Your Instagram Content.

Planning your Instagram content

You’ll discover time-saving apps you can use to plan your content, create better Instagram Stories, and more. Plus you’ll discover exactly how paid partnerships work and learn how you can grab a slice of the $6.5 billion influencer marketing budget, even if you don’t have a gazillion followers just yet.

Oh, and have you always wondered how to get one of those beautiful blue “Verified” checkmarks next to your name? See the verification process demystified right here.

3. Stuff They Don’t Teach You About Instagram

If you’re an Instagram old-timer, you probably think you know all there is to know about using it.

Think again.

Instagram may be a fairly simple app, but with a billion users, and with humans being the creative beings they are, Instagrammers have come up with a ton of useful hacks to do things Mark Zuckerberg never thought of. Learn all about them in Part 3: Stuff They Don’t Teach You About Instagram.

For example, do you know how to respond more quickly to comments by using the text replacement feature on your phone? How to add animated GIFs to your stories with a few taps? How to offer more poll options with the emoji slider? These are just a few of the Instagram hacks you’ll discover.

Plus Instagram is always adding new features. Learn how to get the most out of the brand-new Instagram Create Mode, launched just last month.

Instagram Create Mode Templates

There’s so much more there too, from killer video trends to turning your Instagram content into a career. To see all of it, just head over to the site and start taking your free lessons.

4. Learn From the Insta-Experts

Let’s face it: there’s a ton of Instagram advice out there. But have you ever noticed that a lot of it is written by people whose own Instagram profiles are… kind of underwhelming?

If you want to succeed on Instagram, you probably want to learn from people who have tens or hundreds of thousands of followers. You want to know what they’ve done to achieve that success. What have they learned along the way? What can you do to reach the same level?

That’s where the “Asking for a Friend” interview series comes in. Watch some successful Instagram entrepreneurs talking about their biggest lessons, their best Instagram tips, how they deal with setbacks, and much more.

You can find these fun and inspiring interviews on the School of Instagram homepage. Here’s one of them, with stylist and digital influencer Kristy Wu.


Create an Insta-Site With Milkshake

If you follow the lessons from the School of Instagram, you’ll soon be building a healthy and fast-growing Instagram following. But how do you translate that into sales or traffic for your other projects? After all, Instagram only lets you put one link in your profile.

The best solution is to build an “Insta website”: an eye-catching, mobile-friendly site that quickly states who you are and what you do. Forget complex web design and hosting fees: you can set up a site quickly and easily using the free Milkshake app.

With Milkshake, you can build a bespoke Insta-site on your phone in minutes, and use it to connect your followers to everything you offer.

The site is specially designed for Instagram’s mobile web browser, so your followers can swipe through your site just like Instagram Stories. Seamless!

You can update the site as often as you like. It’s free to create, and the best part is that no software or design skills are needed! What’s not to like? Download the Milkshake iOS app to get started.

And don’t forget to enrol for the School of Instagram to ensure you’re getting the most out of the platform. They’re adding more lessons and interviews all the time, so sign up to make sure you’re the first to find out about the latest Instagram tips and tricks!

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How to Create an Alarm Clock in Cinema 4D: Part 1

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a 3D Alarm Clock model that you can use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning Cinema 4D quickly and easily. 

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, adding lighting to the scene and basic rendering techniques.

In this, the first part of the two-part tutorial, I’ll show you how to:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the Alarm Clock

1. How to Import Reference Images

Step 1

To use the reference image in this tutorial, you will need to switch your viewport to the Front View

Use the middle mouse button to click anywhere on the viewport. This displays all four views (by default this will be perspective, top, right and front). From there, use the middle mouse button to select the Front View.

Viewport showing four view points

Step 2

In the Attributes tab select Mode > View Settings.

Select View Settings

Step 3

In Viewport [Right] select the Back button and click on the button next to Image. 

Select the Back tab

Step 4

Select the reference image from the Finder and open it. In this tutorial I’ll use the front view of an Alarm Clock from Envato Elements to help me.

Alarm clock reference image

Step 5

Adjust the image size and transparency to your liking in the Properties window.

Reference image properties

2. Adjust and Edit the Cylinder Shape

Step 1

In the top menu bar click and hold on the Cube Button (or click on the small black arrow in the bottom right corner of the button). 

In the menu that appears select the Cylinder Button to spawn a cylinder into the scene.

Select the Cylinder button

Step 2

You may need to rotate the cylinder in order to get the right orientation. 

To do this click on the Rotate Tool button and use the tool to rotate the cylinder 90 degrees so that the circular face is pointing forward.

Rotate the Cylinder shape

Step 3

Click on the Object tab in the Properties window. Adjust the size so that the shape of the cylinder fits the shape of the Alarm Clock background image. For this tutorial the following properties are used:

  • Radius: 140 cm
  • Height: 100 cm
  • Height Segments: 1
  • Rotation Segments: 80
  • Orientation: +Y
Adjust the Cylinder Object properties

Step 4

Click on the Caps tab of the properties window. Make sure that Caps has been ticked and the Segments are set to a value of 2.

Adjust the Cap properties

Step 5

By activating caps and setting the segments value to 2, you will see that an extra cap has been created on the face of the cylinder. The shape of the cylinder should roughly fit the shape of the Alarm Clock background image at this stage. 

Ensure that you check the shape using the other camera views as well (perspective, side and top etc).

Using the Alarm Clock reference image

Step 6

Ensure the cylinder is still selected and then click on the Make Editable button to make the shape editable. 

Next select the Polygon Selection button which will allow you to select the polygons of the object.

Click on the Make Editable and the Polygon Selection buttons

Step 7

Hover the mouse over the face of the cylinder and select all of it’s faces (click and hold on the mouse button to select a large area).

Select the front polygons

Step 8

Once all the polygons have been selected, right click on the selected area and select the Bevel Tool.

Select the Bevel Tool

Step 9

Click and drag over the selected area to create a beveled edge for the cylinder. Repeat the steps for the other side.

Use the Bevel Tool

Step 10

Use the Selection Tool again and select all the polygons in the centre of the circle. Then use the Scale Tool to enlarge it (click and drag in the area outside the object to uniform scale).

Expand the selection using the Scale Tool

Step 11

Right-click on the selection and click on the Extrude Tool.

Select the Extrude Tool

Step 12

Click and drag over the selected area to move the polygons inside the cylinder.

Extrude the selection inside the object

Step 13

With the polygons still selected, use the Scale Tool to scale the selection down, making it slightly smaller.

Reduce the size of the selection using the Scale Tool

Step 14

Delete the Phong Tag from the cylinder. This sharpens all the edges and faces of the model. This is further illustrated in step 15.

Remove the Phong Tag

Step 15

In the image below you will see how the edges of the cylinder are very smooth at first before deleting the Phong Tag

Once the Phong Tag has been deleted, the edges sharpen.

Phong Tag removed

3. How to Create a Hemisphere

Step 1

Clear the viewport to make modelling the hemisphere easier. 

To do this you must hide the cylinder model by clicking on the small little grey circle until it turns red. To make it appear in the viewport again, click on the grey circle until it becomes green or grey.

Hide the Cylinder object

Step 2

Create a Sphere by clicking on Cube > Sphere.

Create a new Sphere object

Step 3

Use the Scale Tool to scale the reduce the size of the sphere so that it matches the size of the bells as closely as possible.

Resize the Sphere object using the Scale Tool

Step 4

In the properties window, select the Object Tab and set the properties to the following:

  • Radius: 55 cm
  • Segments: 50
  • Type: Hemisphere
Adjust the object using the properties window

Step 5

By selecting the type to Hemisphere, the shape will be split in half as shown in the image below.

Create a Hemisphere

4. Add Thickness to an Object

Step 1

To add thickness to the hemisphere you will first need to make it into an editable object. Make sure that the object is selected and click on the Make Editable button.

Click on the Make Editable button

Step 2

In the top menu bar, select Simulate > Cloth > Cloth Surface.

Select the Cloth Surface modifier

Step 3

In the List View, move the sphere object below the newly created Cloth Surface.  

Apply the Cloth Surface to the Sphere object

Step 4

Ensure the Cloth Surface has been selected and select the Object tab in the properties window. Set the properties to the following:

  • Subdivisions: 1
  • Factor: 100%
  • Thickness: 10 cm
Adjust the Cloth Surface properties

Step 5

Adjusting the Thickness value in the properties window changes the thickness of the hemisphere.

Adjust the thickness of the Hemisphere object

5. Create the Alarm Clock Bell

Step 1

Rotate the hemisphere by 180 Degrees so that it starts to take on the appearance of the bell.

Rotate the Hemisphere by 180 degrees

Step 2

In the Front View, use the reference image to ensure the size of the hemisphere is roughly the same size as the bells.

Use the Alarm Clock reference image

Step 3

Create a capsule by selecting the Capsule Button from the shapes menu.

Create a Capsule object

Step 4

Ensure the capsule object is selected and change the properties to the following:

  • Radius: 10 cm
  • Height: 200 cm
  • Height Segments: 1
  • Cap Segments: 8
  • Rotation Segments: 36
  • Orientation: +Y
Adjust the Capsule properties

Step 5

Use the Move Tool to move the capsule down so that only a little bit of the tip is sticking out from the top of the hemisphere.

Lower the capsule

Step 6

Select both the Capsule and the Cloth Surface by clicking and holding the Shift Key on the keyboard. Then group them by pressing Alt-G on the keyboard. You can then rename the Null by double clicking on it.

Group the Capsule and Cloth Surface together

Step 7

Make sure that the new group is still selected, use a combination of the Move Tool and the Rotation Tool to position the bell correctly. You can use the reference image to guide you.

Move the group into place

Step 8

Reveal the cylinder shape by clicking on the small red circle until it is grey (or green) again.

Reveal the Cylinder object

Step 9

You can then make any final adjustments to the bell’s position by comparing it to the reference image and the cylinder.

Adjust the bell using the Move and Rotate tools

6. How to use Symmetry in Cinema 4D

Step 1

In the top menu bar select Array > Symmetry.

Select the Symmetry button

Step 2

In the list window move the group containing the bell objects inside the Symmetry Modifier.

Apply the Symmetry Modifier to the group

Step 3

Anything inside the Symmetry Modifier will create a symmetrical object.

Symmetry modifier applied to the bell

7. Add Legs and Details to the Alarm Clock

Step 1

Use the Capsule Object to create legs for the alarm clock. Do this by creating a new capsule object and using the Move Tool and the Rotate Tool to position it into place.

Another way you can do this is by duplicating the capsule (hold the CTRL button on the keyboard whilst using the Move Tool) which was used to create the bell. 

Move the duplicated capsule into position using the Move Tool and the Rotate Tool.

Add a capsule leg

Step 2

Duplicate the leg by using the Symmetry Modifier

Add another capsule leg

Step 3

Adjust the size and radius of the legs by going to the Object tab in the Properties window.

Adjust the capsule leg properties

Step 4

Create a new Capsule and place it in on top of the alarm clock.

Add a capsule object

Step 5

Create a new Sphere and scale it down using the Scale Tool. Place the small sphere on top of the capsule.

Add a sphere object

8. Create the Clock Hands

Step 1

Create a new Cylinder by clicking on Cube > Cylinder from the top menu bar.

Create a new Cylinder Object

Step 2

Adjust the size of the cylinder in the Properties window so that it matches the width of the clock hand. Use the reference image in the front view to help you with this. The settings for the hand used in this tutorial are as follows:

  • Radius: 10 cm
  • Height: 10 cm
  • Height Segments: 1
  • Rotation Segments: 60
  • Orientation: +Y
Adjust the properties of the Cylinder object

Step 3

Ensure the cylinder is selected and then click on the Make Editable button.

Click on the Make Editable button

Step 4

To edit the shape further select the Points Tool and then select the Rectangle Selection Tool.

Select the Points Tool and the Rectangle Selection Tool

Step 5

Then go to the Properties window and un-tick Only Select Visible Elements. This allows you to select all the points within the rectangle selection.

Un-tick Only Select Visible Elements

Step 6

Use the Rectangle Selection Tool to select all the points in the bottom half of the cylinder. 

Select and use the Move Tool and move all the selected points down to create the clock hand.

Move selection downwards

Step 7

When moving a whole object, select and use the Model button. If this is not selected, you may find that you will be moving the points, edges or faces instead.

Select the Model mode button

Step 8

Position the clock hand object by using the Move Tool.

Place clock hand object

Step 8

YUse the Scale Tool to adjust the scale of the object once it is in place.

Use the scale tool for any last minute adjustments

Step 9

Duplicate the clock hand object by using the Move Tool and holding the CTRL button on the keyboard.

Duplicate the hand tool

Step 10

Once you have the hands, position both on the clock face by using the Move Tool and the Rotation Tool

Use the Scale Tool to make one hand smaller if you wish.

Position the hand objects using the Rotate and Move Tools

Coming Next…

Final Alarm Clock 3D Model

In the second part of the the tutorial series, I’ll show you how to:

  • How to Create Coloured Materials
  • How to Add Lighting to the Scene
  • How to Render the Alarm Clock
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How to Create an Alarm Clock in Cinema 4D: Part 2

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a 3D Alarm Clock model that you can use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning Cinema 4D quickly and easily. 

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, adding lighting to the scene and basic rendering techniques.

In the first part of the two-part tutorial, I showed you how to:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the Alarm Clock

In this, the second part of the the tutorial series, I’ll show you how to:

  • How to Create Colored Materials
  • How to Add Lighting to the Scene
  • How to Render the Alarm Clock

9. How to Create a New Material

Step 1

Located near the bottom of the screen there should be a material selection window. Click on Create > New Material to create a new material to use that you can edit. 

Materials are used to colour in the various objects and areas of the Alarm Clock. Such as the clock face, the hands and the bells.

Create a new material

Step 2

Double click on the new material icon (displayed as a sphere). This brings up the Material Editor, where you adjust the various properties of the material such as the colour, transparency and reflectance. 

For this particular style I’m only be interested in flat colour (Luminance).

Open the material editor

Step 3

Tick the button for Luminance and untick the boxes for Color and Reflectance. This gives the cel shaded look for our final image of the Alarm Clock.

Select luminance

Step 4

Colour the Alarm Clock by adding the material to your object. Drag and drop the material to the object using the mouse. 

You may drag and drop the material onto the object listed on the right of the screen. 

This process will be repeated for the other parts of the Alarm Clock. The base colour of the Alarm Clock are as follows:

  • R: 248
  • G: 62
  • B: 81
Change the color

Step 5

Apply this colour to the two bells and the ringer as well.

Apply the color to the bells

10. How to Use Sketch and Toon

Step 1

In the Material Editor, click on the arrow button next to Texture and select Sketch and Toon > Cel from the menu.

Select sketch and toon

Step 2

Click on the new Cel button that appears next to Texture to bring up a new menu.

Click on the cel button

Step 3

In this new menu, adjust the settings as follows:

  1. Change the Diffuse to match the image at below. It should be grey scale with the colour getting light from left to right
  2. Un-tick Camera
  3. Tick Lights
  4. Tick Shadows 
  5. Select Multiply from the drop down menu
Adjust the cel settings

Step 4

Select a colour by double-clicking on the Color option box . 

The Material Editor gives many different options for choosing and picking a colour. These include RGB, HSV etc. 

Choose whichever option you’re most familiar with as a flat colour. Because of the Multiply shading mode, the different colour shades will also appear in the material.

If the material has already been applied to the model, the colour of the model is automatically be adjusted to the new material colour. This is useful if you change your mind on a certain colour or a certain part of the Alarm Clock model.

Select a color

Step 5

Because you’ve already applied the material to the model, the colour of the Alarm Clock will is adjusted to the new material colour. Click on the Render View button to preview the render.

Render view

11. How to Adjust the Shading

Step 1

To get a better idea of the shading and how the render will turn out as you work on it, click and hold on the Render Button and select Interactive Render Region from the menu. 

Select interactive render region

Step 2

Use the mouse to adjust the window so that it fits around the Alarm Clock model. 

Look for the very small arrow on the right hand side of the window and use the mouse to drag it to the top right corner of the box. This increases the resolution. 

Decrease the resolution by moving the arrow down if you find that performance is suffering.

Increase the resolution

Step 3

Right-click on the small arrow and select Alpha Mode. This removes the black background.

Select alpha mode

Step 4

To change the way the light source is facing go to Options > Default Light.

Change the light source in the Default Light window. Click where you would like the light source to come from on the sphere and it will sync with the view port. 

Experiment with different lighting positions to come up with a lighting situation that you like. 

This can be adjusted at anytime so you can change the lighting again if you changed your mind.

Adjust the default light

12. Other Lighting Solutions

Step 1

To set up the basic lighting, go to the Floor button located in the top menu bar. Left Click-Hold and then select Physical Sky from the menu.

Select physical sky

Step 2

Make sure that Physical Sky is selected in the menu on the right, a new menu will appear on the bottom right of the screen. Select the Time and Location tab and choose a time using the left and right arrow keys. 

This changes the lighting of the scene, according to the time of the day. Choose a suitable time to light up the scene. You will be able to see how the lighting will affect the scene in the viewport.

Select the time and location

Step 3

To add a light to the scene, select the Add Light button in the top menu bar at the top of the screen.

This will create a Light Object which you can move around the scene. Move the light object using the Move Tool to a suitable position.

Create a light object

Step 4

To customise the lighting further, experiment with the light object options in the bottom right of the screen. Here, adjust the Intensity, Light Type and even Color.

Adjust the light object

13. How to Colour the Clock Face

Step 1

To create a new material, duplicate the material by holding CTRL on the keyboard and then using the mouse to click and drag the material to the side.

Duplicate the material

Step 2

Double-click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there we can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 247
  • G: 244
  • B: 225
Select a new color for the material

Step 4

Use the selection tool to highlight the polygons on the face of the clock. This is the area that will be coloured using the new material.

Highlight polygons on clock face

Step 5

Apply the colour by click and dragging the new material directly on to the highlighted selection.

Apply new color

14. How to Color the Hands and Legs

Step 1

Create a new material. You can also duplicate a previous material in order to keep the settings from before.

Double click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there we can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 70
  • G: 69
  • B: 65
Create a new material

Step 2

Apply the new material to the legs, bell stands and the clock hands by either clicking on the material and dragging it to the objects via the viewport or via the object list window.

Apply the new material color

15. How to Render the Alarm Clock

Step 1

On the top menu bar, click on the Render Settings button. This brings up the render settings window.

Click on render settings

Step 2

In the render settings menu, change the options to what you need. First you’ll need to tick the Save Settings to select a file location, file format and alpha channel.

Select Alpha Channel if you wish to keep the background see through. This could be useful if you wanted to add a background to the image in Adobe Photoshop.

Adjust the save settings

Step 3

In the Output Settings choose the resolution, height and width of the image. 

Adjust the output settings

Step 4

To ensure that the Alarm Clock render is nice and sharp, go to the Anti-Aliasing settings. Select Cubic (Still Image) which is found under Filter

Adjust the anti-aliasing settings

Step 5

To create the final image of the Alarm Clock, click on the Render button. Remember to ensure you’ve selected the correct view in the viewport (front, right, left or perspective etc.) and that you’re happy with the camera angle. 

Choose a suitable angle in the viewport by navigating around the scene.

Click on the render button

Step 6

If you want to have more control over how the final render looks, create a camera object to help. Find a suitable view using the viewport first and then click on the camera button. 

This creates a camera using the current view in the viewport. Check out the camera settings to see how they affect the final render.

Click on the camera button

The End Result

Final Alarm Clock color render

Wait for the final render to finish. Once the render is complete, repeat the steps above and change the camera or the view port to create a new image from a different angle. 

Throughout the course of the project you have successfully learnt:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the Alarm Clock
  • How to Create Coloured Materials
  • How to Add Lighting to the Scene
  • How to Render the Alarm Clock

Feel free to share your own creations below. You can also export your image into Adobe Photoshop to enhance it further or to use it as part of a larger image.

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How to Create a Switch in Cinema 4D: Part 2

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a 3D Nintendo Switch model to use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning Cinema 4D quickly. 

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, importing reference images, adding lighting to the scene and basic rendering techniques.

In the first part (How to Create a Switch in Cinema 4D: Part 1) of the two-part tutorial, I showed you how to:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the Switch

In this, the second part of the the tutorial series, I’ll show you how to:

  • How to Create Coloured Materials
  • Color in the Nintendo Switch Model
  • Render the Nintendo Switch Model

16. How to Create a New Material

Step 1

Located near the bottom of the screen there is a material selection window. Click on Create > New Material to create a new material to use that you can edit. 

Materials are used to colour in the the Nintendo Switch.

Select New Material from the menu
Select New Material from the menu

Step 2

Double-click on the new material icon (displayed as a sphere). This brings up the Material Editor, where you adjust the various properties of the material such as the colour, transparency and reflectance. 

For this particular style you’ll only be interested in flat colour (Luminance).

Open the Material Editor
Open the Material Editor

Step 3

Tick the button for Luminance and untick the boxes for Colour and Reflectance. This will give the cel shaded look for the final image. 

Select Luminance
Select Luminance

Step 4

Colour the body of the Nintendo Switch by adding the material to the object. Drag and drop the material to the object using the mouse. You can also drag and drop the material onto the object listed on the right of the screen. 

Drag new material on to the 3D model
Drag new material on to the 3D model

17. How to Adjust the Material Properties

Step 1

In the Material Editor, click on the arrow button next to Texture and select Sketch and Toon > Cel from the menu.

Select Sketch and Toon and Cel from the menu
Select Sketch and Toon and Cel from the menu

Step 2

Click on the new Cel button that appears next to Texture to bring up a new menu.

Click on the Cel button
Click on the Cel button

Step 3

In this new menu, adjust the settings as follows:

  1. Change the Diffuse to match the image at below. It should be grey scale with the colour getting light from left to right.
  2. Untick Camera.
  3. Tick Lights.
  4. Tick Shadows 
  5. Select Multiply from the drop down menu.
Adjust the settings in the editor
Adjust the settings in the editor

Step 4

Select a colour by double-clicking on the colour option box . 

The Material Editor gives many different options for choosing and picking colours. These include RGB, HSV and so on. 

Choose whichever option you’re most familiar with as a flat colour. Because of the Multiply shading mode, the different colour shades will also appear in the material.

If the material has already been applied to the model, the colour of the model will automatically be adjusted to the new material colour. This is useful if you change your mind on a certain colour or a certain part of the Nintendo Switch model. 

Choose the following colours for this tutorial:

  • R: 84
  • G: 100
  • B: 153
Create a colour for the object
Create a colour for the object

Step 5

Because you’ve already applied the material to the model, the colour of the Switch is automatically adjusted to the new material colour.

Apply the colour
Apply the colour

18. How to Adjust the Shading

Step 1

To get a  better idea of the shading and how our render will turn out as we work on it, click and hold the Render Button and select Interactive Render Region from the menu. 

Select Interactive Render Region
Select Interactive Render Region

Step 2

Use the mouse to adjust the window so that it fits around the Nintendo Switch model. Look for the very small arrow on the right hand side of the window and use the mouse to drag it to the top right corner of the box (this increases the resolution). 

Decrease the resolution by moving the arrow down if you find that the performance is decreasing.

Adjust the resolution
Adjust the resolution

Step 3

To change the way the light source is facing go to Options > Default Light.

You can also add a light object to the scene if you are more comfortable working that way.  

Select default light
Select default light

Step 4

Change the light source in the Default Light window. Click where you’d like the light source to come from on the sphere and it will sync with the view port. Experiment with different lighting positions to come up with a lighting situation that you like. 

This can be adjusted at anytime so you can change the lighting again if you changed your mind.

Change the lighting direction
Change the lighting direction

19. Other Lighting Solutions

Step 1

To set up the basic lighting, go to the Floor button located in the top menu bar. Primary-Click-Hold and then select Physical Sky from the menu.

Select Physical Sky
Select Physical Sky

Step 2

Make sure that Physical Sky is selected in the menu on the right, a new menu appears on the bottom right of the screen. Select the Time and Location tab and choose a time using the left and right arrow keys. 

This changes the lighting of the scene (according to the time of the day). Choose a suitable time to light up the scene. You’ll see how the lighting affects the scene in the viewport.

Select a Time
Select a Time 

Step 3

To add a light to the scene, select the Add Light button in the top menu bar at the top of the screen.

This creates a Light Object which you can move around the scene. Move the light object using the Move Tool to a suitable position.

Select the Add Light Button
Select the Add Light Button

Step 4

To customise the lighting further, experiment with the light object options in the bottom right of the screen. Here you can adjust the Intensity, Light Type and even Colour.

Light Object adjustments
Light Object adjustments

20. How to Colour the Switch Screen

Step 1

To create a new material we can duplicate the material by holding CTRL on the keyboard and then using the mouse to click and drag the material to the side.

Duplicate material
Duplicate material

Step 2

Double-click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there we can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 81
  • G: 223
  • B: 185
Choose a new colour
Choose a new colour

Step 3

Apply the new material to the screen by clicking and dragging it directly onto the object.

Apply material to model
Apply material to model

21. How to Colour the Joy-Cons

Step 1

Create a new material. Duplicate a previous material in order to keep the settings from before.

Double-click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there we can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 61
  • G: 182
  • B: 255
Create a blue colour for the Joy-Con
Create a blue colour for the Joy-Con

Step 2

Duplicate another new material. Double-click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there we can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 255
  • G: 121
  • B: 122
Create a red colour for the Joy-Con
Create a red colour for the Joy-Con

Step 3

Apply the materials to the relevant Joy-Con’s by dragging and dropping the colours onto the objects in the viewport. 

Use the list of objects in the object manager on the right of the screen. 

Apply new materials to Joy-Cons
Apply new materials to Joy-Cons

22. How to Color the Switch Details

Part 1

To color the details of the Nintendo Switch (such as the joystick and the buttons etc.) we are going to use the dark blue material which was the first material created to colour in the screen.

  • R: 84
  • G: 100
  • B: 153
Use the first material
Use the first material

Part 2

Apply the material to the rail of the Joy-Con by dragging and dropping it onto the object.

Apply material to the rail
Apply material to the rail

Part 3

Apply the material to the four buttons of the Joy-Con by dragging and dropping it onto the button objects one at a time.

Apply material to the buttons
Apply material to the buttons

Part 4

Apply the material to the joysick of the Joy-Con by dragging and dropping it onto the objects.

Apply material to the joystick
Apply material to the joystick

Part 5

Apply the material to the “-” button and the “home” button of the Joy-Con by dragging and dropping it onto the objects.

Apply material to the buttons
Apply material to the buttons

Part 6

For the remaining details, create a new material which should be a slightly darker colour than the first material that was created. 

Choose the following colours for this tutorial:

  • R: 73
  • G: 87
  • B: 133
Create a darker material colour
Create a darker material colour

Part 7

Apply the new material onto the details highlighted in the image below.

Apply material to the details
Apply material to the details

Part 8

For the last part of the Joy-Con, use the main blue colour and apply it by dragging and dropping it onto the object.

Apply material to the object
Apply material to the object

Part 9

Repeat the same steps for the second Joy-Con and replace the blue material with the red material.

Apply the materials to the red Joy-Con
Apply the materials to the red Joy-Con

Part 10

For the final details of the Nintendo Switch apply the dark blue material as shown in the image below.

Apply material to the Nintendo Switch
Apply material to the Nintendo Switch

23. How to Render the Nintendo Switch

Part 1

Click on the camera button to return to the camera view. This should be the same composition used in the previous tutorial ‘How to Create a Switch in Cinema 4D: Part 1‘.

Switch the camera on

Part 2

On the top menu bar, click on the Render Settings button. This brings up the render settings window.

Click on the Render Settings button
Click on the Render Settings button

Part 3

In the render settings menu, you can change the options to what you need. First, tick the Save Settings to select a file location, file format and alpha channel.

Select Alpha Channel if you wish to keep the background see through.

Save settings
Save settings

Part 4

In the Output Settings choose the resolution, height and width of the image. 

Output settings
Output settings

Part 5

To ensure that the render is nice and sharp go to the Anti-Aliasing settings. Select Cubic (Still Image) which can be found under Filter. 

Anti-Aliasing settings
Anti-Aliasing settings

Part 6

To create the final image, click on the Render button. Remember to select the right view in the viewport (front, right, left or perspective etc.) and that you’re happy with the camera angle. 

Choose a suitable angle in the viewport by navigating around the scene.

Click on the Render button
Click on the Render button

Part 7

To create the final image, click on the Render button. Remember to select the right view in the viewport (front, right, left or perspective etc.) and that you’re happy with the camera angle. 

Choose a suitable angle in the viewport by navigating around the scene.

Click on the Camera button
Click on the Camera button

The End Result

Wait for the final render to finish. Once the render is complete you can repeat the steps above and change the camera or the view port to create a new image from a different angle. 

Throughout the course of the project you have successfully learnt how to:

  • Import Reference Images
  • Prepare for Modelling
  • Model a Nintendo Switch
  • Create Materials
  • Colour the Model
  • Render the Nintendo Switch

Feel free to share your own creations below. You can also export your image into Adobe Photoshop to enhance it further or to use it as part of a larger image.

Final Nintendo Switch render
Final Nintendo Switch render
Posted on Leave a comment

How to Create a Switch in Cinema 4D: Part 1

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a 3D Nintendo Switch model that you can use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning Cinema 4D quickly. 

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, importing reference images, adding lighting to the scene and basic rendering techniques.

In this, the first part of the two-part tutorial, I’ll show you:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the Switch

1. How to Import Reference Images

Step 1

To use the reference image in this tutorial, you will need to switch your viewport to the Front View

Use the middle mouse button to click anywhere on the viewport. This will display all four views—by default this will be perspective, top, right and front. From there, use the middle mouse button to select the Front View.

Cinema 4D 4 views
Cinema 4D 4 views

Step 2

In the Attributes tab select Mode > View Settings.

Select View Settings
Select View Settings

Step 3

In Viewport [Right] select the Back button and click on the button next to Image. 

Select the Back button
Select the Back button

Step 4

Select the reference image from the finder and open it. In this tutorial I’ll use the front view of a Nintendo Switch to help me.

Imported Nintendo Switch image in Cinema 4D
Imported Nintendo Switch image in Cinema 4D

Step 5

Once the image is displayed in the background of the viewport, you can change the transparency of the image to your liking. This sometimes makes it easier to model from the reference image.

You can also change the position and size of your reference image from here using Offset X, Offset Y, Size X and Size Y.

Note that the reference image will only appear when selecting front view from the viewport.

Adjust the transparency settings
Adjust the transparency settings

2. How to Create the Base Model

Step 1

To start modelling the main body of the Nintendo Switch, select the Cube object from the top menu bar. This will spawn a cube in the viewport.

Select the Cube object
Select the Cube object

Step 2

Use the reference image of the Nintendo Switch in the Front View to help adjust the cube.

Use the Scale Tool to make the shape of the cube match up with the shape of the Nintendo Switch in the image.

Ensure that you use the other views—front, left, right, perspective etc—to check that the shape looks correct from every angle.

Adjust the cube object to fit the reference image
Adjust the cube object to fit the reference image

Step 3

The shape of the cube should roughly fit the shape of the Nintendo Switch background image at this stage. 

Select the Move Tool. To duplicate this shape you’ll need to hold CTRL button on the keyboard and then click and drag one of the arrows using the mouse. In this case I’ve used the red arrow to drag the new object along the x-axis.

Duplicate object
Duplicate object

Step 4

Use the Scale Tool to adjust the shape of the cube to match up with the shape of the blue Joy-Con in the reference image.

Scale the cube object
Scale the cube object

Step 5

Use the Perspective View to move around the objects and make sure that the overall thickness of the base objects are correct. In the example below the objects are too thick, so the Scale Tool is used to reduce the thickness (click and drag along the z-axis).

Scale the width of the cube objects
Scale the width of the cube objects

3. How to Curve the Joy-Con Corners

Step 1

Ensure you have the object selected and then click on the Make Editable button to make the object editable. Select the Edge Selection button.

Select the Make Editable and Edge Selection buttons
Select the Make Editable and Edge Selection buttons

Step 2

Select the two left corners of the Joy-Con using the selection tool. The selected edges will be highlighted in orange.

Select edges
Select edges

Step 3

Once the edges have been selected, use the mouse to right click on the selected edges. In the menu that appears, find Bevel and select it.

Select Bevel
Select Bevel

Step 4

In the adjustment window (usually located in the bottom right of the screen), play around with the following:

  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer
  • Offset Mode: Fixed Distance
  • Offset: 50 cm
  • Subdivision: 20
  • Depth: 100%

Feel free to adjust the sliders and values until you are satisfied with the object’s appearance. You can also use the Front View and adjust corners to fit the reference image.

Curve the corners
Curve the corners

Step 5

To make visualising the Joy-Con in the view port easier, switch off the screen object by clicking on the small round grey button (until it turns red). This is located to the right of the screen object in the object manager list view.

Click on the button until it turns green (or grey) to make the object reappear again.

Select the red button
Select the red button

Step 6

With the screen object hidden from view it makes navigating around the Joy-Con a lot easier. Use the reference image in the front view to check the shape of the object.

Curve the corners
Curve the corners

Step 7

Select the final two corners of the Joy-Con using the Edge Selection tool.

Select the edges
Select the edges

Step 8

Once the edges have been selected, use the mouse to right click on the selected edges. In the menu that appears, find Bevel and select it. Use the Bevel too to curve the two remaining corners of the Joy-Con.

  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer
  • Offset Mode: Fixed Distance
  • Offset: 10cm
  • Subdivision: 10
  • Depth: 100%
Curve the corners
Curve the corners

4. How to Curve the Screen

Step 1

Select the screen object and click on the Make Editable button followed by the Edge Selection button. 

Ensure that the screen object is no longer hidden by clicking on the small round button in the object manager list view. 

Select the Make Editable and Edge Selection buttons
Select the Make Editable and Edge Selection buttons

Step 2

To make visualising the screen object in the viewport easier, switch off the Joy-Con object by clicking on the small round grey button (until it turns red). 

This is located to the right of the Joy-Con object in the object manager list view.

Click on the red button

Step 3

Once you click on the small round grey button the Joy-Con object should disappear from the viewport. 

Click on the button until it turns green (or grey) to make the object reappear again.

Front view adjustments
Front view adjustments

Step 4

Use the Edge Selection tool to select all four corners of the screen object.

Select the edges
Select the edges

Step 5

Once the edges have been selected, use the mouse to right click on the selected edges. In the menu that appears, find Bevel and select it.

Select Bevel
Select Bevel

Step 6

In the adjustment window (usually located in the bottom right of the screen), play around with the following:

  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer
  • Offset Mode: Fixed Distance
  • Offset: 15 cm
  • Subdivision: 10
  • Depth: 100%

Feel free to adjust the sliders and values until you are satisfied with the object’s appearance. 

You can also use the Front View and adjust corners to fit the reference image.

Curve the corners
Curve the corners

5. How to use Boole

Step 1

To create the top corners of the screen, use the Boole tool. To get started with this select the Cylinder object from the top menu bar. This will spawn a cylinder in the viewport.

Select the Cylinder object button
Select the Cylinder object button

Step 2

Use the Rotate Tool to rotate the cylinder 90 degrees in the z-axis.

Rotate the cylinder object
Rotate the cylinder object

Step 3

Use the Scale Tool to make the cylinder thinner.

Scale the Cylinder object
Scale the Cylinder object

Step 4

In the front view, duplicate the cylinder and use the reference image to position the cylinders to the top corners of the screen object.

Place the cylinder objects
Place the cylinder objects

Step 5

Both cylinder objects should completely cover the corners of the screen. Use the perspective view to move the cylinders into position.

Move the cylinder objects
Move the cylinder objects

Step 6

Once the cylinder objects are in position, select the Boole Tool from the top menu bar. 

Select the Boole Tool
Select the Boole Tool

Step 7

In the object manager list view, select both cylinder objects and group them (Alt-G). This will create a ‘Null’ group containing the selected objects.

Group objects together
Group objects together

Step 8

Move both the screen object and the Null object inside the Boole Tool. Make sure that the screen is positioned above the Null group.

Place objects inside the Boole
Place objects inside the Boole

Step 9

Once the objects have been placed within the Boole Tool, the cylinder object will be subtracted from the screen object. 

Create a cutout shape using Boole
Create a cutout shape using Boole

6. How to Create the Screen

Step 1

To duplicate the screen object, select the it from the object list (found within the Boole tool). Press the CTRL button on the keyboard and click and drag the object you want to duplicate. 

Make sure that the new screen object is outside the Boole tool.

Duplicate the screen
Duplicate the screen

Step 2

Use the Scale Tool to make the new screen object smaller.

Scale the screen
Scale the screen

Step 3

In the front view you can use the reference image to help adjust the size of the screen.

Check the front view
Check the front view

Step 4

Once you are satisfied with the size of the screen, use the Move Tool to move the object inside and just above the surface of the original screen object.

You can also use the Scale Tool to reduce the thickness of the shape so that it becomes thinner.

Scale the screen
Scale the screen

7. How to Create Joy-Con Details

Step 1

Isolate the Joy-Con object to make working in the viewport easier. One way you can do this, is by clicking on the small grey button next to the objects you wish to hide (as shown previously).

Joy-Con shape
Joy-Con shape

Step 2

Click on the small back arrow on the Cube button and select Cylinder from the list of options. This will spawn a cylinder in the scene.

Select the Cylinder object button
Select the Cylinder object button

Step 3

Rotate the new cylinder object in the x-axis using the Rotation Tool.

Rotate the Cylinder object
Rotate the Cylinder object

Step 4

Use the right view in the viewport to check the size of the cylinder. Then use the Scale Tool to reduce the size of the object so that it can easily fit within the width of the Joy-Con.

Scale the Cylinder object
Scale the Cylinder object

Step 5

You can also use the object properties to adjust the size of the cylinder and also the amount of segments it has.

  • Radius: 14 cm
  • Height: 200 cm
  • Height Segments: 1
  • Rotation Segments: 36
  • Orientation: +x
Adjust the object properties
Adjust the object properties

Step 6

With the new cylinder object selected, click on the Make Editable button.

Select the Make Editable button
Select the Make Editable button

Step 7

Use the Move Tool and combine it with the Points Selection Tool.

Select the Move Tool and the Points Selection Tool
Select the Move Tool and the Points Selection Tool

Step 8

In the options window, make sure that the box for ‘Only Select Visible Elements’ is not selected. This will ensure that you will select all the necessary points.

Untick Only Select Visible Elements button
Untick Only Select Visible Elements button

Step 9

Select the bottom half of the cylinder object.

Select half the Cylinder
Select half the Cylinder

Step 10

Use the Move Tool to move the selected points down and making the object longer.

Adjust object shape
Adjust object shape

Step 11

Use the Selection Tool to select the curved corners on the right of the cylinder shape.

Select corners
Select corners

Step 12

Use the Move Tool to move the selected points a little bit to the right to make the object slightly wider.

Adjust object shape
Adjust object shape

Step 13

Click on the Model Mode button on the left of the screen and move the shape to the center of the Joy-Con.

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 14

In the perspective view, use the Move Tool and the Scale Tool to adjust the shape so that it appears slightly above the side surface of the Joy-Con.

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 15

Create three more cylinder objects and move them into position using the Scale Tool and the Move Tool.

Create three additional cylinders
Create three additional cylinders

Step 16

Adjust the bottom cylinder using the Points Tool and the Selection Tool. Select the top half of cylinder and move the points up slightly.

Select the points
Select the points

Step 17

Return to Model Mode and adjust the shapes so that they resemble the image below.

Adjust the shape
Adjust the shape

Step 18

Use the perspective view to move the cylinder objects into position using the Move Tool. The cylinders should be placed within and just above the surface of the Joy-Con.

Move objects into position
Move objects into position

8. How to Duplicate Joy-Con

Step 1

Select all the objects related to the Joy-Con and group them (Alt-G). This will create a new ‘Null Group’.

Group objects together
Group objects together

Step 2

Select the Null group containing the Joy-Con and duplicate it (hold the CTRL button on the keyboard and use the Move Tool).

Duplicate grouped objects
Duplicate grouped objects

Step 3

Rotate the new Joy-Con object 180 degrees using the Rotation Tool.

Rotate Joy-Con
Rotate Joy-Con

Step 4

In the front view, use the reference image to move the new Joy-Con into position (above the red Joy-Con).

Place Joy-Con in the right position
Place Joy-Con in the right position

9. How to Create Buttons

Step 1

Select the Cylinder from the top menu.

Create a Cylinder object
Create a Cylinder object

Step 2

This will spawn a new cylinder object in the viewport. Use the Scale Tool to reduce the size of the cylinder so that it is the same size of the buttons shown in the reference image.

Scale the cylinder object down
Scale the cylinder object down

Step 3

Use the reference image to move the cylinder object into position. Then duplicate the cylinder object to create the other three buttons.

Create buttons
Create buttons

Step 4

Use the perspective view to move the buttons into position. The cylinders should be placed within and just above the surface of the Joy-Con.

Place the buttons
Place the buttons

Step 5

Group the buttons together (Alt-G) and duplicate the new Null object. Use the front view and use the reference image to move the new buttons into a new position above the red Joy-Con.

Duplicate the buttons
Duplicate the buttons

Step 6

Duplicate one of the cylinder buttons and place it into the Home Button position for the red Joy-Con. Once all the buttons have been placed correctly, unhide the red Joy-Con.

Unhide objects
Unhide objects

10. How to Create Joystick

Step 1

Click on the small back arrow on the Cube button and select Cylinder from the list of options. This spawns a cylinder in the scene.

Select the cylinder object
Select the cylinder object

Step 2

Use the Scale Tool to reduce the size of the cylinder so that it matches the size of the joystick.

Scale the cylinder object
Scale the cylinder object

Step 3

Use the Move Tool to move the cylinder into position (use the background reference image in the front view to help with this).

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 4

In the perspective view use the Scale Tool to reduce the thickness of the cylinder object (click and drag along the z-axis).

Scale the cylinder object
Scale the cylinder object

Step 5

Duplicate the cylinder object and use the Scale Tool to reduce the size. 

Scale the cylinder object
Scale the cylinder object

Step 6

Once you are happy with the reduced size of the cylinder, use the Scale Tool to increase the length of the cylinder in the z-axis.

Increase height of the cylinder
Increase height of the cylinder

Step 7

Move both cylinder objects into position above the surface of the Joy-Con. Once the joystick is in position, select the top cylinder and duplicate it.

Duplicate cylinder
Duplicate cylinder

Step 8

Move the new cylinder object into position just above the surface of the Joy-Con. This will act as the base of the joystick.

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 9

Duplicate one of the cylinders again and use the Scale Tool to reduce its size. Place the smaller cylinder just above the top of the joystick.

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 10

Use the Boolean Tool to create a cutaway using the two top cylinder objects. Ensure the smaller cylinder is placed below the larger cylinder when viewed in the object manager list view.

Use Boole Tool
Use Boole Tool

11. How to Create Extra Joy-Con Buttons

Step 1

In the top menu bar select the Cube to spawn a cube into the scene.

Create a cube object
Create a cube object

Step 2

Use the Scale Tool to adjust the cube to the same size as the Capture Button (use the reference image in the front view to help with this). 

Then use the Move Tool to move the cube into position.

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 3

Curve the corners of the cube using the Bevel Tool. 

Curve the corners
Curve the corners

Step 4

Use the Move Tool to place the cube object just above the surface of the Joy-Con.

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 5

Create a new cube object and curve the corners using the Bevel Tool. Click and drag using the mouse to adjust the size of the curve so that it almost resembles a circle.

Select the corners and curve them
Select the corners and curve them

Step 6

Use the Selection Tool to select half of the object and move it to the left to create the ‘-button’.

Select half of the object and adjust
Select half of the object and adjust

Step 7

In the perspective view, use the Move Tool to move the ‘- button’ into position just above the surface of the Joy-Con.

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 8

With all the buttons and the joystick in place, the Joy-Con should resemble the image shown below.

The Nintendo Joy-Con in 3D
The Nintendo Joy-Con in 3D

12. How to Duplicate Joystick

Step 1

Group the objects that make up the joystick by selecting them and pressing Alt-G on the keyboard. This will create a new ‘Null Object’.

Then duplicate the new ‘Null Object’ but holding the Ctrl button on the keyboard and click drag with the mouse using the Move Tool.

Duplicate joystick group
Duplicate joystick group

Step 2

Move the new joystick into position using the reference image in the front view.

Move object into position
Move object into position

13. How to Create + Button

Step 1

Duplicate the ‘- button’ and move it into position.

Move object into position
Move object into position

Step 2

Duplicate the button and use the Rotate Tool and the Move Tool to create a cross shape for the ‘+ button’.

Create the cross button
Create the cross button

Step 3

Unhide the screen object. With all the buttons and both joysticks in place, the Nintendo Switch should finally be taking shape. 

Create a pose
Create a pose

14. How to Create Bottom Screen Details

Step 1

Duplicate the objects on the side of the Joy-Con and rotate it in the z-axis by 90 degrees.

Adjust the details
Adjust the details

Step 2

Move the group of objects to the bottom of the screen just above the surface. Once the ‘Null Object’ is in position, duplicate the group.

Add Nintendo Switch details
Add Nintendo Switch details

Step 3

Select the new group and rotate it 180 degrees. 

Rotate the objects
Rotate the objects

Step 4

Group both objects together and position them in the centre of the screen.

Final Nintendo Switch model in 3D
Final Nintendo Switch model in 3D

15. How to Pose Nintendo Switch

Step 1

Select all the objects associated with each Joy-Con and create separate groups for them. One group for the left Joy-Con and one group for the right Joy-Con.

Use the Move Tool to move each Joy-Con away from the screen slightly as shown in the image below.

Spread the Joy-Cons
Spread the Joy-Cons

Step 2

Move the right Joy-Con up in the y-axis slightly to create an interesting composition. Try out different positions by using the move tool and moving the camera around. 

Post the Nintendo Switch
Post the Nintendo Switch

Coming Next…

In the second part of the the tutorial series, I’ll show you how to:

  • Create Coloured Materials
  • Colour in the Nintendo Switch Model
  • Render the Nintendo Switch Model
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How to Create a Smartwatch in Cinema 4D: Part 2

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a 3D Smartwatch model that you can use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning Cinema 4D quickly. 

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, importing reference images, adding lighting to the scene and basic rendering techniques.

In the first part of the two-part tutorial, I showed you how to:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the Smartwatch

In this, the second part of the the tutorial series, I’ll show you how to:

  • How to Create Coloured Materials
  • How to Add Lighting to the Scene
  • How to Render the Smartwatch

8. How to Create a New Material

Step 1

Located near the bottom of the screen there should be a material selection window. Click on Create > New Material to create a new material to use that you can edit. 

Materials are used to colour in the various objects and parts of the Smartwatch.

Create a new material

Step 2

Double click on the new material icon (displayed as a sphere). This brings up the Material Editor, where you adjust the various properties of the material such as the colour, transparency and reflectance. 

For this particular style you’ll only be interested in flat colour (Luminance).

Choose Luminance

Step 3

Tick the button for Luminance and untick the boxes for Colour and Reflectance. This will give us the cel shaded look for our final image of the Smartwatch.

Unticl Color and Reflectance

Step 4

Colour the Smartwatch, starting with the body, by adding the material to the object. Simply drag and drop the material to the object using the mouse. Drag and drop the material onto the object listed on the right of the screen. 

This process is repeated for the other parts of the Smartwatch. The base colour of the Smartwatch is as follows:

  • R: 201
  • G: 197
  • B: 198
Adjust the color

Step 5

Apply this material colour to the Smartwatch buttons as well

Add the material to the buttons

9. How to Adjust the Material Properties

Step 1

In the Material Editor, click on the arrow button next to Texture and select Sketch and Toon > Cel from the menu.

Choose Sketch and Toon

Step 2

Click on the new Cel button that appears next to Texture to bring up a new menu.

Click on the Cel button

Step 3

In the new menu, adjust the settings as follows:

  1. Change the Diffuse to match the image at below. It should be grey scale with the colour getting light from left to right.
  2. Untick Camera.
  3. Tick Lights.
  4. Tick Shadows 
  5. Select Multiply from the drop down menu.
Select Multiply

Step 4

Select a colour by double-clicking on the colour option box . 

The Material Editor gives you many different options for choosing and picking the colour. These include RGB, HSV etc. Choose whichever option you’re most familiar with as a flat colour. Because of the Multiply shading mode, the different colour shades also appears in the material.

If the material has already been applied to the model, the colour of the model is automatically adjusted to the new material colour. This is useful if you change your mind on a certain colour or a certain part of the Smartwatch model.

Use the Color Picker

Step 5

Because you’ve already applied the material to the model, the colour of the Smartwatch is automatically adjusted to the new material colour.

Adjusted material shown on watch

10. How to Adjust the Shading

Step 1

To get a  better idea of the shading and how our render will turn out as you work on it, click and hold on the Render Button and select Interactive Render Region from the menu. 

Choose Interactive Render Region

Step 2

Use the mouse to adjust the window so that it fits around the Smartwatch model. Look for the very small arrow on the right hand side of the window and use the mouse to drag it to the top right corner of the box (this increases the resolution). 

Decrease the resolution by moving the arrow down if you find that the performance is decreasing.

Increase the Resolution

Step 3

To change the way the light source is facing go to Options > Default Light.

Add a light object to the scene if you are more comfortable working that way. 

Change light source direction

Step 4

Change the light source in the Default Light window. Click where you’d like the light source to come from on the sphere and it’ll sync with the view port. Experiment with different lighting positions to come up with a lighting situation that you like. 

This is adjusted at anytime so you can change the lighting again if you changed your mind.

Click on the Default Light

11. Other Lighting Solutions

Step 1

To set up the basic lighting, go to the Floor button located in the top menu bar. Left Click-Hold and then select Physical Sky from the menu.

Choose Physical Sky

Step 2

Ensure that Physical Sky is selected in the menu on the right, a new menu appears on the bottom right of the screen. Select the Time and Location tab and choose a time using the left and right arrow keys. 

This changes the lighting of the scene (according to the time of the day). Choose a suitable time to light up the scene. You’ll see how the lighting affects the scene in the viewport.

Choose Time and Location

Step 3

To add a light to the scene, select the Add Light button in the top menu bar at the top of the screen.

This will create a Light Object which you can move around the scene. Move the light object using the Move Tool to a suitable position.

Select Light Object

Step 4

To customise the lighting further, experiment with the light object options in the bottom right of the screen. Here you can adjust the Intensity, Light Type and even Colour.

Adjust the Light Object

12. How to Colour the Smartwatch Screen

Step 1

To create a new material we can duplicate the material by holding CTRL on the keyboard and then using the mouse to click and drag the material to the side.

Duplicate the Material

Step 2

Double click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there change the colour to the following:

  • R: 56
  • G: 47
  • B: 66
Change the color of the Luminance

Step 3

Apply the new material to the screen by clicking and dragging it directly onto the object.

Color the Smartwatch screen

13. How to Colour the Smartwatch Wrist Strap

Step 1

Create a new material. Duplicate a previous material in order to keep the settings from before.

Double click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there change the colour to the following:

  • R: 70
  • G: 69
  • B: 65
Choose a new color for the wrist strap

Step 2

Apply the new material to both of the wrist straps by either clicking on the material and dragging it to the objects via the viewport or via the object list window.

Add material to the wrist strap

14. How to Render the Smartwatch

Step 1

On the top menu bar, click on the Render Settings button. This brings up the render settings window.

Click on Render Settings

Step 2

In the Render Settings menu, change the options to what you need. First you will need to tick the Save Settings to select a file location, file format and alpha channel.

Select Alpha Channel if you wish to keep the background see through. This is useful if you wish to add a background to the image in Adobe Photoshop.

Enter Save Settings

Step 3

In the Output Settings choose the resolution, height and width of the image. 

Enter Output Settings

Step 4

To ensure that the Smartwatch render is nice and sharp, go to the Anti-Aliasing settings. Select Cubic (Still Image) which can be found under Filter

Choose Cubic Still Image

Step 5

To create the final image of the Smartwatch, click on the Render button. Remember to make sure that you’ve selected the right view in your viewport (front, right, left or perspective etc.) and that you’re happy with the camera angle. 

Choose a suitable angle in the viewport by navigating around the scene.

Click on the Render button

Step 6

For more control over how the final render looks, create a camera object to help. Find a suitable view using the viewport first and then click on the camera button. 

This creates a camera using the current view in the viewport. Check out the camera settings to see how they will affect the final render.

Click on the Camera button

The End Result

Wait for the final render to finish. Once the render is complete, repeat the steps above and change the camera or the view port to create a new image from a different angle. 

Throughout the course of the project you’ve learnt how to:

  • Import Reference Images
  • Prepare for Modelling
  • Model an Smartwatch
  • Create Coloured Materials
  • Add Lighting to the Scene
  • Render the Smartwatch

Feel free to share your own creations below. You can also export your image into Adobe Photoshop to enhance it further or to use it as part of a larger image.

Final Smartwatch render

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How to Create a Smartwatch in Cinema 4D: Part 1

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a 3D Smartwatch model that you can use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning Cinema 4D quickly. 

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, importing reference images, adding lighting to the scene and basic rendering techniques.

In this, the first part of the two-part tutorial, I’ll show you:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the Smartwatch

1. How to Import Reference Images

Step 1

Use the middle mouse button to click anywhere on the viewport. This displays all four views. From there, use the middle mouse button to select the Right view.

Cinema 4D views

Step 2

In the Attributes tab select Mode > View Settings.

View settings

Step 3

In Viewport [Right] select the Back button and click on the button next to Image. 

Choose back button

Step 4

Select the reference image from the finder and open it.

Reference image displayed

Step 5

Once the image is displayed in the background of the viewport, change the transparency of the image. This can sometimes make it easier to model from the reference image.

Change the position and size of the reference image from here using Offset X, Offset Y, Size X and Size Y.

Adjust the transparency

2. How to Model the Watch Face

Step 1

To start modelling the face of the Smartwatch, select the Cube object from the top menu bar. This spawns a cube in the viewport.

Select Cube from the menu

Step 2

Use the reference image of the Smartwatch in the Front View to help adjust the cube. 

Use the Scale Tool to make the shape of the cube match up with the shape of the Smartwatch in the image.

Ensure that you use the other views (front, left, right, perspective etc) to check that the shape looks correct from every angle.

Transform the cube to fit reference image

Step 3

With the object still selected, use the mouse to click the Make Editable button to allow you to adjust the model further.

Clicking the Make Editable button disables the options for when you first spawn the object.

Because of this you must make sure that you are happy with the current shape of the cube before clicking this button.

Select the Make Editable button

Step 4

Select the Edge Selection Tool.

Edge Selection Tool button

Step 5

Use the Edge Selection Tool to select all four corners of the object. The selected edges are highlighted in orange.

Select the edge corners of the cube

Step 6

Once the edges have been selected, use the mouse to right click on the selected edges. In the menu that appears, find Bevel and select it.

Select the Bevel Tool

Step 7

In the adjustment window (usually located in the bottom right of the screen), play around with the following:

  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer
  • Offset Mode: Fixed Distance
  • Offset: 50cm
  • Subdivision: 10
  • Depth: 100%

Feel free to adjust the sliders and values until you are satisfied with the object’s appearance.

Curve the corners of the cube

Step 8

In the images below you can see how the edges are effected once the values have been changed.

Use the reference image of the Smartwatch in the Front View to help whilst you adjust the corners. 

Use reference image

Step 9

Click on the small black arrow in the bottom right corner of the Bend Tool in the top menu bar. Select Bevel from the list. This creates a Bevel tool in the list of objects on the right of the screen.

Choose Bevel button from top menu

Step 10

Select the Bevel tool and drag it into the Cube object. This will apply the bevel features to the cube.

Bevel in listed view

Step 11

Ensuring that the Bevel tool is selected in the object list, use the adjustments window to change the way that the bevel works. 

For this tutorial, the following are used:

  • Use Angle: Tick
  • Angle Threshold: 68 Degrees
  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer
  • Offset Mode: Radial
  • Offset: 20cm
  • Subdivision: 6

Feel free to adjust the sliders and values until you are satisfied with the object’s appearance.

Adjust the Bevel object settings

Step 12

In the images below you can see how the cube is changed once the values have been changed. This makes the object appear smoother, which correctly matches the appearance of the Smartwatch which is being modelled.

Curved edges

Step 13

For a more stylised and graphical approach, reduce the Bevel Subdivisions to a value of 1.

Simplified edges

Step 14

This gives the Smartwatch a sharper bevel for a more stylised look. However, if you’re going for a more realistic look with a smoother bevel, increase the number of Bevel Subdivisions instead.

Low Poly watch face

3. How to Create the Smartwatch Screen

Step 1

To start modelling the screen of the Smartwatch, duplicate the current object from the list view. Do this by holding CTRL on the keyboard to click and drag a duplicate object.

Duplicate the watch face

Step 2

Remove the Bevel Modifier from the duplicate object.

Remove Bevel

Step 3

Use the Scale Tool to adjust the thickness of the new object.

Ensure that you use the other views (front, left, right, perspective etc) to check that the shape looks correct from every angle.

Scale watch face

Step 4

Once the shape and size of the cube has been adjusted correctly, use the Move Tool to move the screen into position.

Move object into position

4. How to Create the Smartwatch Buttons

Step 1

Click on the small back arrow on the Cube button and select Cylinder from the list of options. This will spawn a Cylinder in the scene.

Select Cylinder from top menu

Step 2

Adjust the properties of the Cylinder so that it is facing the correct way, has the correct size and has the desired thickness for the button. 

Use the Move Tool to move the button into the correct place using the background image as the reference. 

The settings for the Cylinder are as follows:

  • Radius: 25cm
  • Height: 25cm
  • Height Segments: 1
  • Rotation Segments: 36
  • Orientation: -X
Place button

Step 3

Ensure that the cylinder is selected and click on the Make Editable Button. 

Choose Make Editable Button

Step 4

Duplicate the cylinder. This acts as the second button.

Duplicate button

Step 5

Now that the object is editable, edit the points. Ensure the second cylinder object is selected and click on Points Button. 

Click on the Rectangle Selection Tool to select the points to edit. Select the points to then move them using the Move Tool.

Select Points Tool

Step 6

Use the Rectangle Selection Tool to select half of the cylinder. Then use the Move Tool to move the points down.

Adjust points

Step 7

To move the two buttons into position, when moving a whole object, select and use the Model button. If this is not selected, you may find that you’ll be moving the points, edges or faces instead.

Select Model button

Step 8

Use the Move Tool to move the two buttons into position.

Move new button into position

Step 9

Ensure that you use the other camera views to ensure that the button placement is correct and moved to the right area.

Check all views

5. How to Create the Watch Strap

Step 1

To start modelling the wrist strap of the Smartwatch, select the Cube object from the top menu bar. 

This spawns a cube in the viewport.

Choose Cube object from menu

Step 2

Adjust the properties of the cube so that it resembles the appearance of a wrist strap. This is usually represented as a very long rectangular shape. 

The settings for the strap are as follows:

  • Size X: 230 cm
  • Size Y: 1000 cm
  • Size Z: 45 cm
Adjust cube to make strap shape

Step 3

In order for the shape to bend correctly, width segments must be added to the object. For a smoother bend more segments should be added (Y).

Add segments to watch strap

6. How to use the Bend Deformer 

Step 1

In order to create a suitable bend to the wrist strap you will need to use the Bend Deformer. Select the Bend button from the top menu bar. 

This spawns a bend deformer object in the list view.

Select Bender deformer from menu

Step 2

In the list view move the Bend Deformer into the watch strap object. This means that the deformer will affect and influence the watch strap object only.

Move bend deformer in list menu

Step 3

With the Bend Deformer selected make sure that Fit to Parent has been ticked. The ensures that the deformer affects the whole watch strap.

Click fit to Parent

Step 4

With the Bend Deformer still selected, go to the parameters box and play around with the Strength

In this tutorial I used the following settings:

  • Strength: 180
  • Angle: 90
Adjust Bend Derformer parameters

Step 5

In the list view, select the watch strap object again and use the Rotate and Move tools to move it to the correct position on the smart watch.

Move and rotate strap into place

7. How to Complete the Watch Strap

Step 1

In order to edit the watch strap further click the Make Editable button on the top left corner of the screen.

Select Make Editable button

Step 2

Choose the Polygon Tool and use the Move Tool to extend the tip of the watch strap. 

You’ll also notice that by going into an edit mode like this disables the Bend Deformer temporarily. 

Use Polygon Tool

Step 3

Once you return to Model Mode by clicking on the model button, the strap appears as normal with the extended geometry.

Return to Model Mode

Step 4

Choose the Edge Tool from the left menu.

Choose Edge Tool

Step 5

Use the Edge Tool and the Selection Tool to select the edges of the extended strap.

Select watch strap edges

Step 6

With the edges still selected, use the Bevel Tool to curve the edges.

Select the Bevel Tool

Step 7

In the edit window, change the settings to the following:

  • Bevel Mode: Chamfer 
  • Offset Mode: Fixed Distance
  • Offset: 72 cm
  • Subdivision: 30
  • Depth: 100%
Bevel the corners of the watch strap

Step 8

Return to Model Mode to see how the watch strap looks and finalise any further adjustments you’d like to make. 

Once you’re happy with the way it looks, duplicate the watch strap. Do this by holding CTRL on the keyboard to click and drag a duplicate object.

Rotate the duplicate strap by 180 degrees and place it on the bottom of the watch.

Duplicate watch strap

Coming Next…

Final smart watch 3D model

In the second part of the tutorial series, I’ll show you:

  • How to Create Coloured Materials
  • How to Add Lighting to the Scene
  • How to Render the Smartwatch

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How to Create an iPhone in Cinema 4D: Part 2

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Follow this tutorial step-by-step to create a 3D iPhone model to use in video games, graphic design and illustration projects whilst learning Cinema 4D quickly. 

Some of the skills you’ll learn in this tutorial include creating basic 3D modelling, importing reference images, adding lighting to the scene and basic rendering techniques.

In the first part of the two-part tutorial, I showed you how to:

  • How to Import Reference Images
  • How to Prepare for Modelling
  • How to Model the iPhone

In this, the second part of the the tutorial series, I’ll show you how to:

  • How to Create Coloured Materials
  • How to Add Lighting to the Scene
  • How to Render the iPhone

9. How to Create a New Material

Step 1

Located near the bottom of the screen there is a material selection window. Click on Create > New Material to create a new material to use that you can edit. 

Materials are used to colour in the various objects and parts of the iPhone.

Select New Material from the menu
Select New Material from the menu

Step 2

Double click on the new material icon (displayed as a sphere). This will bring up the Material Editor, where you can adjust the various properties of the material such as the colour, transparency and reflectance. 

For this particular style we will only be interested in flat colour (Luminance).

Open the Material Editor
Open the Material Editor

Step 3

Tick the button for Luminance and untick the boxes for Colour and Reflectance. This will give the cel shaded look for the final image. 

Select Luminance
Select Luminance

Step 4

Colour the iPhone body by adding the material to the object. Drag and drop the material to the object using the mouse. You can also drag and drop the material onto the object listed on the right of the screen. 

Drag new material on to the 3D model
Drag new material on to the 3D model

10. How to Adjust the Material Properties

Step 1

In the Material Editor, click on the arrow button next to Texture and select Sketch and Toon > Cel from the menu.

Select Sketch and Toon and Cel from the menu
Select Sketch and Toon and Cel from the menu

Step 2

Click on the new Cel button that appears next to Texture to bring up a new menu.

Click on the Cel button
Click on the Cel button

Step 3

In this new menu, adjust the settings as follows:

  1. Change the Diffuse to match the image at below. It should be grey scale with the colour getting light from left to right.
  2. Untick Camera.
  3. Tick Lights.
  4. Tick Shadows 
  5. Select Multiply from the drop down menu.
Adjust the settings in the editor
Adjust the settings in the editor

Step 4

Select a colour by double-clicking on the colour option box . 

The Material Editor gives many different options for choosing and picking colours. These include RGB, HSV and so on. Choose whichever option you are most familiar with as a flat colour. Because of the Multiply shading mode, the different colour shades will also appear in the material.

If the material has already been applied to the model, the colour of the model will automatically be adjusted to the new material colour. This is useful if you change your mind on a certain colour or a certain part of the iPhone model.

Pick a colour
Pick a colour 

Step 5

Because we’ve already applied the material to the model, the colour of the iPhone will automatically be adjusted to the new material colour.

The new material is applied

11. How to Adjust the Shading

Step 1

To get a  better idea of the shading and how our render will turn out as we work on it, click and hold on the Render Button and select Interactive Render Region from the menu. 

Select Interactive Render Region
Select Interactive Render Region

Step 2

Use the mouse to adjust the window so that it fits around the iPhone model. Look for the very small arrow on the right hand side of the window and use the mouse to drag it to the top right corner of the box (this increases the resolution). 

Decrease the resolution by moving the arrow down if you find that the performance is decreasing.

Adjust the resolution
Adjust the resolution

Step 3

To change the way the light source is facing go to Options > Default Light.

You can also add a light object to the scene if you are more comfortable working that way.  

Select default light
Select default light

Step 4

Change the light source in the Default Light window. Click where you’d like the light source to come from on the sphere and it will sync with the view port. Experiment with different lighting positions to come up with a lighting situation that you like. 

This can be adjusted at anytime so you can change the lighting again if you changed your mind.

Change the lighting direction
Change the lighting direction

Step 5

Secondary-click on the arrow and select Alpha Mode in order to reveal the rest of the viewport. Some people may find working this way easier.

Select Alpha Mode
Select Alpha Mode

12. Other Lighting Solutions

Step 1

To set up the basic lighting, go to the Floor button located in the top menu bar. Primary-Click-Hold and then select Physical Sky from the menu.

Select Physical Sky
Select Physical Sky

Step 2

Make sure that Physical Sky is selected in the menu on the right, a new menu will appear on the bottom right of the screen. Select the Time and Location tab and choose a time using the left and right arrow keys. 

This will change the lighting of the scene (according to the time of the day). Choose a suitable time to light up the scene. You’ll see how the lighting affects the scene in the viewport.

Select a Time
Select a Time 

Step 3

To add a light to the scene, select the Add Light button in the top menu bar at the top of the screen.

This creates a Light Object which you can move around the scene. Move the light object using the Move Tool to a suitable position.

Select the Add Light Button
Select the Add Light Button

Step 4

To customise the lighting further, experiment with the light object options in the bottom right of the screen. Here you can adjust the Intensity, Light Type and even Colour.

Light Object adjustments
Light Object adjustments

13. How to Colour the iPhone Screen

Step 1

To create a new material we can duplicate the material by holding CTRL on the keyboard and then using the mouse to click and drag the material to the side.

Duplicate material
Duplicate material

Step 2

Double-click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there we can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 56
  • G: 47
  • B: 66
Choose a new colour
Choose a new colour

Step 3

Apply the new material to the screen by clicking and dragging it directly onto the object.

Apply material to model
Apply material to model

14. How to Colour the iPhone Details

Step 1

Create a new material. You can also duplicate a previous material in order to keep the settings from before.

Double-click on the new material to open up the Material Editor and select Luminance. From there we can change the colour to the following:

  • R: 70
  • G: 69
  • B: 65
Choose a new colour
Choose a new colour

Step 2

Apply the new material to the button objects inside the cutout group. You can also apply the material by clicking and dragging it to the object in the viewport.

Apply material to objects in list view
Apply material to objects in list view

Step 3

When the material is applied, the details will change colour to reflect the material.

Apply new material to iPhone details
Apply new material to iPhone details

Step 4

Repeat the same steps for the side buttons. For the side buttons, use the same colour material which was used for the iPhone body.

Apply new material to iPhone buttons
Apply new material to iPhone buttons

Step 5

For the back camera details, use the dark grey colour. Remember that you can change the colour of the material at a later date as well.

Apply new material to iPhone camera
Apply new material to iPhone camera

15. How to Render the iPhone

Step 1

On the top menu bar, click on the Render Settings button. This brings up the render settings window.

Click on the Render Settings button
Click on the Render Settings button

Step 2

In the render settings menu, you can change the options to what you need. First, tick the Save Settings to select a file location, file format and alpha channel.

Select Alpha Channel if you wish to keep the background see through.

Save settings
Save settings

Step 3

In the Output Settings choose the resolution, height and width of the image. 

Output settings
Output settings

Step 4

To ensure that the render is nice and sharp go to the Anti-Aliasing settings. Select Cubic (Still Image) which can be found under Filter. 

Anti-Aliasing settings
Anti-Aliasing settings

Step 5

To create the final image, click on the Render button. Remember to select the right view in the viewport (front, right, left or perspective etc.) and that you’re happy with the camera angle. 

Choose a suitable angle in the viewport by navigating around the scene.

Click on the Render button
Click on the Render button

Step 6

If you want to have more control over how your final render looks, create a camera object to help. Find a suitable view using the viewport first and then click on the camera button. 

This will create a camera using the current view in the viewport. Check out the camera settings to see how they affect the final render.

Click on the Camera button
Click on the Camera button

The End Result

Wait for the final render to finish. Once the render is complete you can repeat the steps above and change the camera or the view port to create a new image from a different angle. 

Throughout the course of the project you have successfully learnt how to:

  • Import Reference Images
  • Prepare for Modelling
  • Model an iPhone
  • Create Materials
  • Colour the Model
  • Render the iPhone

Feel free to share your own creations below. You can also export your image into Adobe Photoshop to enhance it further or to use it as part of a larger image.

Final iPhone render
Final iPhone render