Exporting From Blender 2.8 To Godot

With the release of Blender 2.8, there is a ton of interest in using Blender 2.8 with Godot.  The process of importing/exporting has always been one of the biggest challenges for game developers and the newest version of Blender 2.8 is no exception.  We already created a step by step tutorial on creating, texturing and animating a model in Blender 2.79 and successfully import it to Blender.  This video is slightly different, in that we are going to be looking at the options available to export from Blender 2.8. 

There are three primary options available, each with their advantages and disadvantages:

  • COLLADA
  • glTF
  • FBX

In this video we look at the process with each format when using Blender 2.8.  For this example we use the model Laiku freely available on Sketchfab, that is non-trivial, fully textured and simply animated.  Please also note that FBX import to Blender requires Godot 3.2 which is as of writing in development still.  If you don’t want to build Godot yourself, you can get nightly builds here.

Art Design


SHADERed Free GLSL/HLSL Shader Editor

Released a few weeks back, SHADERed is a free and open source editing environment for developing shaders, both HLSL and GLSL.  SHADERed enables you to create shaders on the fly with a real-time view of the results.  Currently it is Windows only, but the code is currently being ported from D3D to OpenG+SDL so this could change in the future.

Features of SHADERed include:

  • instantly see changes
  • vertex, pixel and geometry shaders
  • render states
  • audio file support
  • load obj 3d model files
  • load your own textures into shaders
  • render results to render texture (or screen)
  • create and edit your own input variables
  • shader statistics
  • code editor with compilation and error reporting
  • custom themes and templates

SHADERed is available on Github here.  The code is available under the liberal MIT license.  Compiled binaries for Windows are available here.  Check the video below to see SHADERed in action.

Design Programming


Machinations–Game Design Tool

Machinations.io is a fairly rare breed, a tool dedicated to game design.  Currently in a free beta, Machinations is a browser based tool for designing and simulating mechanics for gameplay.

Descriptions for the Machinations.io website FAQ:

Machinations.io is a browser-based platform to design, balance and simulate game systems. It allows you to map any game system in an interactive diagram, set parameters that define elements and the relationship between them, and visualise the way in which these systems work. Based on that, you can simulate different outcomes, plot results and balance your game economy.

If you are familiar with diagramming software like Visio or have used a mind mapping application, you have a decent understanding of Machinations.  Machinations is however one of those tools that is easier to understand when seen in action, so I would recommend watching the video below.

GameDev News Design


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Codeless/Visual Scripting Game Engines

No-code or codeless systems are becoming more and more common among game engines and they offer a few benefits. Using a visual programming language enables non-programmers to interact with the code in a more tactile way, while the code itself tends to be a bit more self documenting then most scripting or programming languages. Make no mistake, you are still programming, you just aren’t typing in lines of code in a text editor, instead you script logic by defining events and properties or by connecting nodes together in a graph.

If you are interested in game engines with traditional scripting options, be sure to check out our guides to C/C++, C#, Haxe, Lua, JavaScript and Python game engines.

In this article we are going to look at the majority of codeless options among modern game engines, both 2D and 3D.

3D Game Engines

Armory 3D

Built on top of the Blender open source 3D application, this game engine has a node based option for game development, in addition to a Haxe based API.  Learn more here.

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BuildBox

BuildBox is a commercial game engine sold on a subscription basis that uses an entirely visual based node programming system.  Aimed at making games without requiring any programming knowledge.

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CryEngine

CryEngine is a AAA calibre game engine with a visual programming language named Schematyc.  It is designed to enable programmers to expose portions of their game logic to designers.  Writing a full game in Schematyc is not really the purpose.

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CopperCube 6

CopperCube 6 recently received a free version.  It is designed to work by attaching and configuring actions and behaviors to game objects.  You can expend the functionality in JavaScript, but creating a game entirely without coding is quite possible.

Learn more here.

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Godot

The Godot game engine has a Visual Scripting Language, with much of the same functionality of GDScript.  You can mix and match between the two scripting styles in the same game.  Honestly though, it’s not really that useful yet.

Learn more here.

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Unity

Unity doesn’t actually support Visual Scripting, although a Visual Scripting language is in the works for a 2019 release.  In the meanwhile there are several addons adding a Visual programming language such as Bolt.

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Unreal Engine

Unreal has perhaps the most robust visual programming language in the form of Blueprint, that can be used for everything C++ can, beyond changing the engine code itself.  It is also perhaps the most complicated visual programming language on this list.

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2D Game Engines

Clickteam Fusion 2.5

Perhaps most famous for making the 5 Nights series of games, this game engine use a tree/spreadsheet hybrid approach.

Learn more here.

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Construct 3

Construct 3 is a commercial, subscription based game engine that runs entirely in the browser.  Uses an event sheet programming model very similar to GDevelop and ClickTeam Fusion.

Learn more here.

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Stencyl

Stencyl is a game engine using a lego style brick approach to programming.  There is a free version available and the visual programming language ultimately generates Haxe code, which you can also code with.

Learn more here.

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Scratch

Scratch is an MIT project aimed at teach programming concepts to kids.  It, like Stencyl, uses a lego brick style programming interface.

Learn more here.

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GDevelop

GDevelop is a free and open source game engine that uses a programming model based on behaviors and events.

Learn more here.

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GameMaker Studio 2

YoYoGame’s GMS2 has been around for decades and is a complete game editing environment with two programming options.  A visual drag and drop programming system, and their own GM scripting language.

Learn more here.

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GameSalad

GameSalad is focused at students and non-programmers and is programmed using a behavior based logic system.  I have virtually no experience with this game engine.

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Pixel Game Maker MV

Pixel GameMaker MV is a complete commercial game making package from the same publisher as RPGMaker.  It uses a visual programming system and property based programming model.  It’s also pretty awful, IMHO.

Learn more here.

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Design Programming


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ShaderFrog Shader Editor

If you are looking for a tool to quickly create complex shaders by mixing and matching existing shaders, ShaderFrog might be the perfect tool for you!  Running entirely in your browser, ShaderFrog can be used to create WebGL shaders in two ways.  First you can create a shader by connecting together existing shaders, to create a new composite shader.  Shaders can even be imported from ShaderToy or the GLSL Sandbox.

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In addition to the composition based approach, there is also a full blown GLSL text editor with automatic compilation/error reporting, syntax highlighting and more.  Once you are happy with your created shader, you can save it, share it, or export it to iOS, Unity or Three.js.

Check out ShaderFrog in action in the video below.

Programming Design Art


Exporting Rigged Textured and Animated Models From Blender to Godot Tutorial

One of the most requested Godot tutorials I get is to cover how to export models from Blender to Godot and retain textures, animations and more.  Therefore I have created exactly that tutorial in both video and text formats, hosted on our sister site devga.me.  This tutorial is mostly in Blender, showing how to properly configure textures, an armature and create NLA strips so when exported “it just works” in Godot.  This example uses Blender 2.79 and Godot 3.1.

Don’t forget, if you want to learn Godot we have a complete Godot 3.x tutorial series available here, a step by step creating a full 2D game tutorial available here.  We also have Blender tutorials available in our tutorial section that should get you up to speed using the popular open source 3D application.

Art Design


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GAEA from QuadSpinner

GAEA (not to be confused with GAIA for Unity), is a newly released terrain generation tool from QuadSpinner.  They describe GAEA as:

Gaea takes terrain design toe-to-toe with the rest of the CG landscape. Designed with artists and their vision in mind, Gaea brings together advanced toolsets in an easy-to-use package where you can get Hollywood quality results in minutes.

Using either a simple stack of nodes, or a more complex graph of nodes, you can easily compose primitive landscapes, apply millions of years of erosion and other modifiers, mix and match nodes to your hearts content, until you get the perfect terrain for your game.  The ultimate output from GAEA are height maps that can be used in almost any modern 3D game engine.  GAEA is available at a number of different price points, including a completely free but still usable for commercial projects tier.

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GAEA is available for download on Windows PCs here.  For more details of GAEA, a getting started tutorial or just to see GAIA in action, watch the video below.

Design GameDev News


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Fedora 30 supplemental wallpapers

Each release, the Fedora Design team works with the community on a set of 16 additional wallpapers. Users can install and use these to supplement the standard wallpaper. The Fedora Design team encourages submissions from the whole community. Contributors then use the Nuancier app to vote on the top 16 to include.

Voting has closed on the extra wallpapers for Fedora 30. Voters chose from among 56 submissions. A total of 128 Fedora contributors voted, choosing the following 16 backgrounds to include in Fedora 30:

(Editors’ note: Thank you to Sirko Kemter, who authored this article and conducted the voting process.)

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Fedora Classrooms: Silverblue and Badge Design

Fedora Classroom sessions continue with two introductory sessions, on using Fedora Silverblue (February 7), and creating Fedora badges designs (February 10). The general schedule for sessions is availble on the wiki, along with resources and recordings from previous sessions. Details on both these upcoming sessions follow.

Topic: Fedora Silverblue

Fedora Silverblue is a variant of Fedora Workstation that is composed and delivered using ostree technology. It uses some of the same RPMs found in Fedora Workstation but delivers them in a way that produces an “immutable host” for the end user.  This provides atomic upgrades for end users and allows users to move to a fully containerized environment using traditional containers and flatpaks.

This session is aimed at users who want to learn more about Fedora Silverblue,
ostree, rpm-ostree, containers, and Flatpaks.  It is expected that attendees have some basic Linux knowledge.

The following topics will be covered:

  • What’s an immutable host?
  • How is Fedora Silverblue different from Fedora Workstation?
  • What is ostree and rpm-ostree?
  • Upgrading, rollbacks, and rebasing your host.
  • Package layering with rpm-ostree.
  • Using containers and container tools (podman, buildah).
  • Using Flatpaks for GUI applications

When and where

Instructor

Micah Abbott is a Principal Quality Engineer working for Red Hat. He remembers his first introduction to Linux was during university when someone showed him Red Hat Linux running on a DEC Alpha Workstation.  He’s dabbled with  various distributions in the following years, but has always had a soft spot for  Fedora. Micah has recently been contributing towards the development  of  Fedora/Red Hat CoreOS and before that Project Atomic.  He enjoys engaging with the community to help solve problems that users are facing and has most recently been spending a lot of time involved with the Fedora Silverblue community.

Topic: Creating Fedora Badges Designs

Fedora Badges is a gamification system created around the hard work of the Fedora community on the various aspects of the Fedora Project. The Badges project helps to drive and motivate Fedora contributors to participate in all different parts of Fedora development, quality, content, events, and stay active in community initiatives. This classroom will explain the process of creating a design for a Fedora Badge.

Here is the agenda for the classroom session:

  • What makes a Fedora Badge?
  • Overview of resources, website, and tickets.
  • Step by step tutorial to design a badge.

Resources needed:

  • Inkscape.
  • Comfortaa typeface.
  • Fedora badges resources (colour palettes, graphics, templates).

On Fedora, inkscape and comfortaa can be installed using dnf:

sudo dnf install inkscape aajohan-comfortaa-fonts

When and where

Instructor

Marie Nordin is a graphic designer and fine artist, with a day job as a Assistant Purchasing Manager in Rochester, NY. Marie began working on the Fedora Badges project and the Fedora Design Team in 2013 through an internship with the Outreachy program. She has maintained the design side of the Fedora Badges project for four years, as well as running workshops and teaching others how to  contribute designs to Badges.

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New Godot 3.1 Tutorial Series! Creating a Complete 2D Game Step by Step

We just published a brand new 18 part text tutorial series over on DevGa.me, Getting Started with Godot Step by Step Tutorial Series.  This tutorial walks you through theEBookCoverA4Format entire game creation process using Godot 3.1, from creating your initial project, to publishing your game with details step by step instructions and screen shots.  Even better it’s got professional quality art assets from Game Developer Studios and is completely open source!

The tutorial consist of:

Getting Started with Godot

Setup and Project Creation

Creating your Title Screen

Playing Background Music

Global Data via Autorun

Creating a Simple UI

Creating the Main Game Scene

Creating Parallax Clouds

Creating the Player

Handling Input

Add a Scene Animation

Creating Bullets

Creating the Enemies

Configuring the Collisions

Populating the Game World

Adding Shooting to the Game

Making Things Explode

The Final Code

Building your Game for Windows

If you need more detailed information on any subject we cover, be sure to check our existing Godot 3 Tutorial series, that goes into much more technical detail.  There will be a step by step video version available shortly.  There is also a 70pg PDF version of this tutorial available for Patreons.

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