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Fedora 29 on ARM on AWS

This week Amazon announced their new A1 arm64 EC2 Instances powered by their arm64 based Graviton Processors and, with a minor delay, the shiny new Fedora 29 for aarch64 (arm64) is now available to run there too!

Details on getting running on AWS is in this good article on using AWS tools on Fedora article and over all using Fedora on the AWS arm64 EC2 is the same as x86_64.

So while a new architecture on AWS is very exciting it’s at the same time old and boring! You’ll get the same versions of kernel, same features like SELinux and the same versions of the toolchain stacks, like the latest gcc, golang, rust etc in Fedora 29 just like all other architectures. You’ll also get all the usual container tools like podman, buildah, skopeo and kubernetes, and orchestration tools like ansible. Basically if you’re using Fedora on AWS you should be able use it in the same way on arm64.

Getting started

The initial launch of A1 aarch64 instances are available in the following four regions: US East (N. Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (Oregon), Europe (Ireland). Direct links to launch the Fedora aarch64 AMIs directly are available here on the Fedora Cloud site.

Getting help

The Fedora support for aarch64 is very robust. It’s been widely used and tested across a number of platforms but of course with new users and new use cases will pick up issues that we’ve yet to encounter. So what is the best way to get help? If you’re having a crash in a particular application it should be reported in the usual way through RH Bugzilla, we have an ARMTracker tracker alias to block against to help identify Arm issues. For assistance with Arm specific queries and issues the Fedora Arm mailing list and we have the #fedora-arm IRC channel on Freenode.

Known issues

We have one known issue. The instance takes a while to get started, it can be up to 5 minutes. This is due to entropy and has been a general problem in virtual environments, across all architectures. We’re working to speed this up and it should be fixed soon. Once things are up an running though everything runs as expected.

Upcoming features

There will be Fedora 29 Atomic host coming in the next Two Week Atomic release, we unfortunately missed their release this time by a small window but it’ll be available in about 2 weeks with their next release and will appear on the site once released. We can’t let you have all the fun at once 😉

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4 cool new projects to try in COPR for October 2018

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in the standard Fedora repositories. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the standard set of Fedora Fedora packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

GitKraken

GitKraken is a useful git client for people who prefer a graphical interface over command-line, providing all the features you expect. Additionally, GitKraken can create repositories and files, and has a built-in editor. A useful feature of GitKraken is the ability to stage lines or hunks of files, and to switch between branches fast. However, in some cases, you may experience performance issues with larger projects.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides GitKraken for Fedora 27, 28, 29 and Rawhide, and for OpenSUSE Tumbleweed. To install GitKraken, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable elken/gitkraken sudo dnf install gitkraken

Music On Console

Music On Console player, or mocp, is a simple console audio player. It has an interface similar to the Midnight Commander and is easy use. You simply navigate to a directory with music files and select a file or directory to play. In addition, mocp provides a set of commands, allowing it to be controlled directly from command line.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides Music On Console player for Fedora 28 and 29. To install mocp, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable Krzystof/Moc sudo dnf install moc

cnping

Cnping is a small graphical ping tool for IPv4, useful for visualization of changes in round-trip time. It offers an option to control the time period between each packet as well as the size of data sent. In addition to the graph shown, cnping provides basic statistics on round-trip times and packet loss.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides cnping for Fedora 27, 28, 29 and Rawhide. To install cnping, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable dreua/cnping sudo dnf install cnping

Pdfsandwich

Pdfsandwich is a tool for adding text to PDF files which contain text in an image form — such as scanned books. It uses optical character recognition (OCR) to create an additional layer with the recognized text behind the original page. This can be useful for copying and working with the text.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides pdfsandwich for Fedora 27, 28, 29 and Rawhide, and for EPEL 7. To install pdfsandwich, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable merlinm/pdfsandwich sudo dnf install pdfsandwich
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4 cool new projects to try in COPR for July 2018

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

Hledger

Hledger is a command-line program for tracking money or other commodities. It uses a simple, plain-text formatted journal for storing data and double-entry accounting. In addition to the command-line interface, hledger offers a terminal interface and a web client that can show graphs of balance on the accounts.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides hledger for Fedora 27, 28, and Rawhide. To install hledger, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable kefah/HLedger sudo dnf install hledger

Neofetch

Neofetch is a command-line tool that displays information about the operating system, software, and hardware. Its main purpose is to show the data in a compact way to take screenshots. You can configure Neofetch to display exactly the way you want, by using both command-line flags and a configuration file.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides Neofetch for Fedora 28. To install Neofetch, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable sysek/neofetch sudo dnf install neofetch

Remarkable

Remarkable is a Markdown text editor that uses the GitHub-like flavor of Markdown. It offers a preview of the document, as well as the option to export to PDF and HTML. There are several styles available for the Markdown, including an option to create your own styles using CSS. In addition, Remarkable supports LaTeX syntax for writing equations and syntax highlighting for source code.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides Remarkable for Fedora 28 and Rawhide. To install Remarkable, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable neteler/remarkable sudo dnf install remarkable

Aha

Aha (or ANSI HTML Adapter) is a command-line tool that converts terminal escape sequences to HTML code. This allows you to share, for example, output of git diff or htop as a static HTML page.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides aha for Fedora 26, 27, 28, and Rawhide, EPEL 6 and 7, and other distributions. To install aha, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable scx/aha sudo dnf install aha
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Install an NVIDIA GPU on almost any machine

Whether for research or recreation, installing a new GPU can bolster your computer’s performance and enable new functionality across the board. This installation guide uses Fedora 28’s brand-new third-party repositories to install NVIDIA drivers. It walks you through the installation of both software and hardware, and covers everything you need to get your NVIDIA card up and running. This process works for any UEFI-enabled computer, and any modern NVIDIA GPU.

Preparation

This guide relies on the following materials:

  • A machine that is UEFI capable. If you’re uncertain whether your machine has this firmware, run sudo dmidecode -t 0.  If “UEFI is supported” appears anywhere in the output, you are all set to continue. Otherwise, while it’s technically possible to update some computers to support UEFI, the process is often finicky and generally not recommended.
  • A modern, UEFI-enabled NVIDIA card
  • A power source that meets the wattage and wiring requirements for your NVIDIA card (see the Hardware & Modifications section for details)
  • Internet connection
  • Fedora 28

Example setup

This example installation uses:

Hardware and modifications

PSU

Open up your desktop case and check the maximum power output printed on your power supply. Next, check the documentation on your NVIDIA GPU and determine the minimum recommended power (in watts). Further, take a look at your GPU and see if it requires additional wiring, such as a 6-pin connector. Most entry-level GPUs only draw power directly from the motherboard, but some require extra juice. You’ll need to upgrade your PSU if:

  1. Your power supply’s max power output is below the GPU’s suggested minimum power. Note: According to some NVIDIA card manufacturers, pre-built systems may require more or less power than recommended, depending on the system’s configuration. Use your discretion to determine your requirements if you’re using a particularly power-efficient or power-hungry setup.
  2. Your power supply does not provide the necessary wiring to power your card.

PSUs are straightforward to replace, but make sure to take note of the wiring layout before detaching your current power supply. Additionally, make sure to select a PSU that fits your desktop case.

CPU

Although installing a high-quality NVIDIA GPU is possible in many old machines, a slow or damaged CPU can “bottleneck” the performance of the GPU. To calculate the impact of the bottlenecking effect for your machine, click here. It’s important to know your CPU’s performance to avoid pairing a high-powered GPU with a CPU that can’t keep up. Upgrading your CPU is a potential consideration.

Motherboard

Before proceeding, ensure your motherboard is compatible with your GPU of choice. Your graphics card should be inserted into the PCI-E x16 slot closest to the heat-sink. Ensure that your setup contains enough space for the GPU. In addition, note that most GPUs today employ PCI-E 3.0 technology. Though these GPUs will run best if mounted on a PCI-E 3.0 x16 slot,  performance should not suffer significantly with an older version slot.

Installation

1. First, open up a terminal, and update your package-manager (if you have not done so already), by running:

sudo dnf update 

2. Next, reboot with the simple command:

reboot 

<!– Authors left out code or an app in this step, so since it's optional…

3. (Optional) If you’d like, check your system’s current GPU performance to compare against:
To verify that your NVIDIA card performs better than your current setup, you may want to record your current GPU’s performance before installation. To do so, scroll down to the “Run GLMark2” section under “Verification.” Record your current GLMark2 score, then proceed to the next steps.
–>

3. After reboot, install the Fedora 28 workstation repositories:

sudo dnf install fedora-workstation-repositories 

4. Next, enable the NVIDIA driver repository:

sudo dnf config-manager --set-enabled rpmfusion-nonfree-nvidia-driver 

5. Then, reboot again.

6. After the reboot, verify the addition of the repository via the following command:

sudo dnf repository-packages rpmfusion-nonfree-nvidia-driver info 

If several NVIDIA tools and their respective specs are loaded, then proceed to the next step. If not, you may have encountered an error when adding the new repository and you should give it another shot.

7. Login, connect to the internet, and open the software app. Click Add-ons> Hardware Drivers> NVIDIA Linux Graphics Driver> Install.

Then, reboot once again.

8. After reboot, go to ‘Show Applications’ on the side bar, and open up the newly added NVIDIA X Server Settings application. A GUI should open up, and a dialog box will appear with the following message:

NVIDIA X Server Prompt

Take the application’s advice, but before doing so, ensure you have your NVIDIA GPU on-hand and are ready to install. Please note that running nvidia xconfig as root and powering off without installing your GPU immediately  may cause drastic damage. Doing so may prevent your computer from booting, and force you to repair the system through the reboot screen. A fresh install of Fedora may fix these issues, but the effects can be much worse.

If you’re ready to proceed, enter the command:

sudo nvidia-xconfig 

If the system prompts you to perform any downloads, accept them and proceed.

9. Once this process is complete, close all applications and shut down the computer. Unplug the power supply to your machine. Then, press the power button once to drain any residual power to protect yourself from electric shock. If your PSU has a power switch, switch it off.

10. Finally, install the graphics card. Remove the old GPU and insert your new NVIDIA graphics card into the proper PCI-E x16 slot, with the fans facing down. If there is no space for the fans to ventilate in this position, place the graphics card face up instead, if possible. When you have successfully installed the new GPU, close your case, plug in the PSU, and turn the computer on. It should successfully boot up.

NOTE: To disable the NVIDIA driver repository used in this installation, or to disable all fedora workstation repositories, consult The Fedora Wiki Page.

Verification

1. If your newly installed NVIDIA graphics card is connected to your monitor and displaying correctly, then your NVIDIA driver has successfully established a connection to the GPU.

If you’d like to view your settings, or verify the driver is working (in the case that you have two GPUs installed on the motherboard), open up the NVIDIA X Server Settings app again. This time, you should not be prompted with an error message, and information on the X configuration file and your NVIDIA GPU should be available (see screenshot below).

NVIDIA X Server Settings

Through this app, you may alter your X configuration file should you please, and may monitor the GPU’s performance, clock speed, and thermal information.

2. To ensure the new card is working at capacity, a GPU performance test is needed. GL Mark 2, a benchmarking tool that provides information on buffering, building, lighting, texturing, etc, offers an excellent solution. GL Mark 2 records frame rates for a variety of different graphical tests, and outputs an overall performance score (called the glmark2 score).

Note: glxgears will only test the performance of your screen or monitor, not the graphics card itself. Use GL Mark 2 instead.

To run GLMark2:

  1. Open up a terminal and close all other applications
  2. sudo dnf install glmark2
  3. glmark2
  4. Allow the test to run to completion for best results. Check to see if the frame rates match your expectation for your NVIDA card. If you’d like additional verification, consult the web to determine if a glmark2 benchmark has been previously conducted on your NVIDA card model and published to the web. Compare scores to assess your GPUs performance.
  5. If your framerates and/or glmark2 score are below expected, consider potential causes. CPU-induced bottlenecking? Other issues?

Assuming the diagnostics look good, enjoy using your new GPU.

References:

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4 cool new projects to try in COPR for June 2018

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

Ghostwriter

Ghostwriter is a text editor for Markdown format with a minimal interface. It provides a preview of the document in HTML and syntax highlighting for Markdown. It offers the option to highlight only the paragraph or sentence currently being written. In addition, Ghostwriter can export documents to several formats, including PDF and HTML. Finally, it has the so-called “Hemingway” mode, in which erasing is disabled, forcing the user to write now and edit later.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides Ghostwriter for Fedora 26, 27, 28, and Rawhide, and EPEL 7. To install Ghostwriter, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable scx/ghostwriter sudo dnf install ghostwriter

Lector

Lector is a simple ebook reader application. Lector supports most common ebook formats, such as EPUB, MOBI, and AZW, as well as comic book archives CBZ and CBR. It’s easy to setup — just specify the directory containing your ebooks. You can browse books in Lector’s library using either a table or book covers. Among Lector’s features are bookmarks, user-defined tags, and a built-in dictionary.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides Lector for Fedora 26, 27, 28, and Rawhide. To install Lector, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable bugzy/lector sudo dnf install lector

Ranger

Ranger is a text-based file manager with Vim key bindings. It displays the directory structure in three columns. The left one shows the parent directory, the middle the contents of the current directory, and the right a preview of the selected file or directory. In the case of text files, Ranger shows actual contents of the file as a preview.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides Ranger for Fedora 27, 28, and Rawhide. To install Ranger, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable fszymanski/ranger sudo dnf install ranger

PrestoPalette

PrestoPalette is a tool that helps create balanced color palettes. A nice feature of PrestoPalette is the ability to use lighting to affect both lightness and saturation of the palette. You can export created palettes either as PNG or JSON.

Installation instructions

The repo currently provides PrestoPalette for Fedora 26, 27, 28, and Rawhide, and EPEL 7. To install PrestoPalette, use these commands:

sudo dnf copr enable dagostinelli/prestopalette sudo dnf install prestopalette